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LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY. MASS 



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LINCOLN 1994 



COVER: Shy kid, chicken farmer, gardener, family man, lay preacher, 
leading lawyer, mentor, and Town Moderator, David Donaldson reminded 
us by example that Lincoln is above all else our hometown, and that 
as such, we each owe it our best. 



(Photo courtesy of the Lincoln Journal ) 



REPORT 



of the 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



of the 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1994 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



Printed By AGSiff ORMS WC. 

1000 WASHINGTON ST. • BRAINTREE, MA 02184 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 9 

Town Clerk 23 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 57 

Town Accountant 60 

Board of Assessors 68 

Tax Equity Study Committee 71 

Collector of Taxes 74 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire & Police Departments 76 

Public Safety Building Design Committee' 79 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring & Plumbing 80 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 82 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 83 

Council on Aging 87 

Minuteman Home Care 89 

Dog Officer 90 

Recycling Committee 91 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 93 

Board of Appeals 96 

Conservation Commission 98 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 104 

Housing Commission 108 

Water Commissioners 109 

Public Works 112 

Pierce Property Committee 113 

Cemetery Commissioners 114 

Lincoln Historic District Commission 117 

Route 128 Area Committee 118 

Bemis Hall Advisory Committee 120 

Codman Community Farms 121 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 126 

Lincoln Personnel Board 128 



LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Lincoln Public Library 129 

DeCordova Museum & Park 140 

Lincoln Cultural Council 144 

Recreation Committee 146 

Celebrations Committee 147 

Matadepera Exchange Committee 149 

Bemis Lecture Trustees 150 

Lincoln School Committee 152 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 160 

Lincoln Scholarship Committee 173 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 174 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School 177 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 184 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 189 

Valuation List 206 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 

LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
PLANNING BOARD 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
HOUSING COMMISSION 

OTHER COMMITTEES 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1995-96 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



Every Monday evening, 7:30 p.m., 
Town Offices Building, 259-8850 

Generally held two Mondays per month; 
call the Superintendent's Office for 
dates and times, 259-9400 

For appointments, call Town Offices 
Building, 259-8850 

First Monday evening of each month, 
7:30 p.m., Town Offices Building 

Every other Wednesday evening, 
8:00 p.m., Town Offices Building 

First & third Wednesdays of each 
month, 7:30 p.m., Town Offices Building 

Second and fourth Monday evenings of 
each month, 7:30 p.m., Town Offices 
Building 

See bulletin board, Town Offices 
Building 

5,085 (Town Census) 

14.56 square miles 

Has not been set at this time 

March 25, 1995 

(Saturday before last Monday in March) 

March 27, 1995 

(Last Monday in March) 



Residence in Town of Lincoln 

3,243 (As of December 1994) 

Open Monday through Friday, 

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Closed Saturdays) 

Telephone 259-8850 (All departments) 



board of selectmen GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

John S. Kerr, II 

Peter C. Sugar 

Harriet B. Todd, Chairman 

INTRODUCTION 

The biggest change in 1994 was not in anything tangible, but in 
the attitude of Town government. The Report of the Task Force on 
Town Governance gave insights as to where and how Lincoln's 
government was perceived to be off course, and made several 
suggestions on how to create a positive team approach, with boards 
and staff working together toward solutions appropriate to Lincoln. 
The Selectmen took a major step in this endeavor in hiring 
Tim Higgins as our Executive Secretary. Tim seems naturally suited 
by temperment and training to use his position to provide support to 
boards and committees and assist them in arriving at informed 
decisions. He also has the professional knowledge and managerial 
skills to translate those decisions into a well run government 
operation. 

The Selectmen dealt with several concrete problems as well. 
Major construction was begun to renovate the elementary school 
complex, to reconstruct a portion of Lincoln Road, to build a contact 
chamber off Sandy Pond Road, to widen Library Lane and improve the 
entrance to the Library, to lay water main pipes on Route 117, and to 
upgrade the facilities at DeCordova Museum. Though all these 
projects will ultimately benefit the Town, the process has been very 
disruptive, and has definitely impacted people's daily lives. 

Concerns about traffic through town was also a major issue. 
Focused by the reconstruction of Lincoln Road, the volume and speed 
of vehicles driving through Lincoln was brought to the attention of 
the Selectmen again and again. At year's end the Selectmen, in 
conjunction with the Planning Board, appointed a Traffic Committee to 
look at the issue on a townwide basis and make recommendations that 
could be supported by residents in all areas of town. 

GOVERNANCE AND PEOPLE 

The Report of the Task Force on Town Governance was accepted by 
Town Meeting in March. The report calls for open and responsive town 
government, the encouragement of volunteers, and cooperation between 
boards and between boards and staff, with each recognizing their 
roles and responsibilities. The Selectmen enthusiastically embraced 
the report, and began to implement many of its suggestins from moving 
Selectmen's Meetings to a larger room to make visitors feel more 
welcome, to changing the focus of the Selectmen's role--spending more 
time on setting policy and strategic planning, and being less 
involved with the details of Town operations. The Selectmen have 
also begun work on a mission statement for the Board and annual goals 
and objectives. The latter ideas were the result of a working session 



the Selectmen held with the Executive Secretary and a consultant in 
local government which explored roles and team building. The Board 
intends to repeat such sessions on a periodic basis. 

A prime example of the recommendations of the Governance Task 
Force in action was the process to hire our new Executive Secretary. 
David Ramsay left at the end of June after the Selectmen decided not 
to reappoint him. We thank David for his hard work and devotion to 
Lincoln, and wish him well in his new career. The Selectmen 
appointed a search committee to work with a consultant to draft a 
profile for the position, and to screen candidates down to four 
finalists. The process was very open, culminating in a day in 
Lincoln where each finalist met with board members, staff and 
citizens. The Selectmen were looking for a person who would restore 
the balance to an executive secretary form of government where the 
independently elected boards would be empowered to do their jobs, and 
Town Offices would become more user-friendly and responsive, while at 
the same time maintaining the quality of services provided by the 
staff. We think that Tim Higgins, who started work in September, 
very ably fills the role. His open and friendly manner combined with 
a quick understanding of Lincoln's ways has won him many supporters 
among board members and townspeople, in addition to the Selectmen. 

1994 saw turnover in other key positions as well. Betty Lang 
retired as Town Accountant/Finance Director and Jim Arena retired as 
Fire and Police Chief, each with almost twenty years of service to 
the Town. To both, the Selectmen offer their thanks and best 
wishes. Suzanne Marchand joined the staff in November as Betty's 
replacement. Her expertise in computer technology will be much 
appreciated as upgrading the town computer system is a high priority 
for the Selectmen. The search for a new chief was an open process 
similar to that for the Executive Secretary. The Board reconfirmed 
that it wanted a single chief for the public safety departments, 
which include emergency medical services and dispatching as well as 
fire and police protection. The Selectmen were looking for a strong 
leader who will be a team and morale builder, as well as someone who 
will update the departments in training and equipment. The Board 
decided to promote Allen Bowles from within the existing force. He 
will take over early in 1995. 

This year the Elementary School Committee also hired a new 
Superintendent and Business Manager, and the Library Trustees hired a 
new Director. The Selectmen look on this turnover in several key 
positions as an ideal opportunity to forge new cooperative 
relationships and consider new directions. 

On the Board itself, Robert DeNormandie did not run for 
reelection due to pressures at work. He was replaced by Peter Sugar 
who dove right into Selectmen issues after several years on the 
Finance Committee. 



Sadly, 1994 also brought the death of David Donaldson. David was 
the Town Moderator for 17 years, but more than that, he was one of 
the guiding spirits of Lincoln, the person many of us turned to for 
mediation or advice on matters governmental and personal. He was a 
good friend to the Town and to each of us — we will miss him. The 
Selectmen appointed Ken Bergen to serve as Moderator through the 1995 
Town Meeting. After that, the position is open to anyone who wishes 
to run. 

CONSTRUCTION 

There were several construction projects in 1994 which disrupted 
traffic and impacted neighborhoods, but which in the end will result 
in necessary improvements in the Town's infrastructure. The largest 
project is the additions and renovations to the elementary school 
complex. In a testimony to townwide cooperation, representatives of 
several boards, town and school staff and school children joined in a 
groundbreaking ceremony in early June. In August we were notified 
that we will receive state reimbursement (SFMSB Funds) starting in 
1995 — a big help in defraying the tax impact of the project. The 
construction proceeds on schedule, despite the death of a worker, 
Alan Courage, in a tragic accident on the site. 

Work was also begun on the state-mandated contact chamber for the 
water system after a flurry of last-minute discussions on the 
possibility of an alternate location for the facility at the Bedford 
Road reservoir site, but finally reconfirming its original site on 
conservation land. The project immediately ran into problems, first 
by encountering more ledge than was expected, requiring extra cost 
for blasting and backfilling, and more ominously, with the discovery 
of hazardous waste identified as petroleum products in the pipe 
trench along Sandy Pond Road. The Selectmen declared a public health 
emergency since the trench was close to the Flint's Pond water 
supply. The state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) was 
notified, and the contaminated soil was removed and disposed of 
according to regulations. The project is slightly behind schedule, 
but the Town does not anticipate any problem with maintaining the 
waiver from filtration granted by DEP. 

Lincoln Road was torn up for the summer and much of the fall in 
order to improve the drainage and reconstruct the road from the base 
up. The Selectmen held numerous hearings starting in the fall of 
1993 to gather input from the neighborhood and other interested 
citizens. The primary concerns we heard were slowing down the 
through traffic and improved safety for pedestrians, especially 
school children, on the roadside paths. The solution included new 
and rebuilt stone walls and granite curbs, much to the surprise of 
many residents (and the dismay of some). The road will receive a 
final coat of paving in the spring, along with the rebuilding of the 
island around the water trough at the five corners. The result will 
be a safer road for drivers and pedestrians alike. 



The entrance to the Library was remodelled to provide a space for 
handicapped parking, together with handicapped access, and to make it 
more attractive. Library Lane was also widened to provide for safer 
parking, particularly in the winter. 

Lastly, a water main was installed to serve a new development on 
South Great Road. Current projects also include the renovation of 
the DeCordova Museum and additions to its school buildings as part of 
a multimillion dollar upgrade, overhaul and expansion of its 
facilities. At the same time the Carroll School is in the process of 
adding accomodations for its high school on it's Baker Bridge Road 
campus. It did seem for a while that the entire town was being torn 
up, and one could not get from point A to point B without a major 
detour. However, maintenance of the Town's infrastructure is a 
never-ending task which the Selectmen will continue to pursue in the 
future . 

TRAFFIC AND REGIONAL PLANNING 

The reconstruction of Lincoln Road became the focal point of many 
townspeople's concerns about traffic--the ever increasing amount, the 
speed and the effect on the quality of life of residents along main 
roads. The idea of appointing a Traffic Committee was raised at Town 
Meeting and at many of the public hearings to discuss Lincoln Road. 
As a first step the Planning Board held several public hearings on 
the turning restrictions designed to keep commuters out of Lincoln 
Center, which were proposed by the former Traffic Committee in the 
mid eighties. It quickly became apparent that solutions to protect 
one part of town had adverse impact on other roads, and so were 
opposed by residents in those neighborhoods. As a result the 
Selectmen and the Planning Board jointly appointed a committee 
composed of residents from all areas of town to discuss traffic 
related isses and recommend traffic management ideas. 

The Selectmen, Planning Board and other town boards also worked 
with Polaroid regarding their proposed office park development on 
their Winter Street property. Polaroid agreed to undertake a traffic 
study and to fund several other mitigating measures as part of their 
proposal. Spurred by the renewed threat of commercial development, 
the Waltham residents of the area filed a petition with the County 
Commissioners to discontinue a portion of Old County Road so that it 
would remain forever closed to through traffic. The Selectmen 
followed with a letter and petitions signed by Lincoln residents in 
support of the request. As of year end we have not heard from the 
Commissioners as to their proposed actions. 

Other traffic related measures taken by the Selectmen include 
signage and barriers to improve the safety of the railroad crossings 
on Route 117 and Tower Road, rejecting a proposed four-way stop sign 
at the intersection of Lincoln and Codman Roads, addressing the 
problem of overflow parking from Walden Pond on Lincoln side streets, 
reviewing the painting of crosswalks, and following the proposed 
relocation of Route 126 at Walden Pond. The Selectmen also responded 



to requests for better speed limit enforcement by increasing the 
radar patrols on Lincoln and Bedford Roads. 

Since traffic and development issues are often regional problems 
requiring cooperation among neighboring towns / the Selectmen continue 
to be represented on several regional groups. 

The HATS (Hanscom Area Towns Study) Committee composed of 
Selectmen representatives of the four towns, Bedford, Concord, 
Lexington, and Lincoln, focused on two main issues. First, the 
monitoring of Hanscom Airport, including meeting with Massport 
officials, to ensure that its operational impact on the surrounding 
towns is contained, both by working towards restricting any potential 
expansion and by controlling the noise generated by aircraft 
traffic. Secondly, concerns about the very real possibility that 
Hanscom Air Force Base may be closed down as part of the current 
round of Base Realignment and Closure recommendations. All four 
towns have written letters to the Secretary of the Air Force and the 
Massachusetts Congressional delegation vigorously recommending that 
Hanscom be kept off the list. 

On the Route 2 Corridor Advisory Committee representatives of 
Lincoln, Concord, and Acton work with the Massachusetts Highway 
Department (MHD) to provide local input on short and long term 
improvements to Route 2. The interim improvements at Crosby's Corner 
were completed this year, as were signal upgrades at five 
intersections in Concord. Final solutions for Crosby's Corner, the 
Concord Rotary and other areas are several years away. 

The Cambridge Watershed Advisory Committee consists of 
representatives from Cambridge, Waltham, Lexington, Lincoln, and 
Weston who meet to discuss ways to protect the reservoir and preserve 
it as a water supply. This year the Committee approved cooperative 
emergency response procedures in case of a hazardous materials spill, 
as well as a notification procedure for major developments within the 
watershed. 

The Selectmen agreed to join MAGIC, a subregioh of the 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council. Membership is a way of keeping 
current with traffic and development issues beyond the immediate HATS 
area. 

TOWN DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES 

For the most part the ongoing operations of the Town are holding 
on a maintenance course. Staff in all departments continue to do an 
outstanding job with minimum personnel and limited resources. A 
prime example of the "Jack of All Trades" spirit is the DPW. The 
Department not only kept on top of the record snowfall last winter 
with the help of the Water Department and Conservation personnel, but 
added hauling trash and recycled materials to their many other 
duties. The DPW crew also prepared and paved the Codman Road 
path — the first new addition to the roadside path network in many 



years. A Hazardous Waste Collection Day was held in October, the 
first in four years, a successful collaboration of Town staff and 
League of Women Voters volunteers. The Water Department won the 1994 
DEP Public Water System Medium Community System Award--a tribute to 
the outstanding work of the Water Board, Town Engineer, and Water 
employees . 

One long-standing legal case was settled when the Town and the 
Bar Yam family agreed to terms which included the purchase of several 
items useful in water rescue. Emergency response and training 
procedures for cold water rescue have already been in place for some 
time. However, the Selectmen became involved in a new lawsuit 
involving the Board's decision to dispose of two St. Bernard dogs 
owned by a Lincoln resident, one of whom had attacked and seriously 
bitten a woman. At year's end the dogs were under a court 
restraining order pending a court hearing on the case. 

Town Offices took an additional step into the technological age 
with the acquisition of a fax machine and a new computer in the 
Assessor's Office. Unfortunately, Assistant Assessor Virginia Noyes, 
who made great strides in computerizing the assessing function, left 
at year end. Her work, however, will continue. Staff is currently 
looking into a new telephone system which will allow for direct 
dialing and voice mail, and a major upgrade in computer hardware and 
software. The goal is not only to produce required reports faster 
and more efficiently by linking all departments, including the 
Library and School Business Offices, but to be able to produce a 
variety of management reports which will help boards and staff in 
their decision making. 

The Public Safety Departments also received a technology boost 
with the implementation of E911. The system displays the addresses 
of all emergency calls on a computer screen, allowing for fast 
response even when the caller is unable to give his or her location. 
Staff at Town Offices and in the Police and Fire Departments are to 
be commended for their thorough work in making sure the program came 
on line with complete and accurate data and personnel fully trained 
in its use. The Selectmen look forward to far greater changes with 
the hiring of the new Chief and the approval of the proposed 
renovations and addition to the Public Safety Building. The Board 
has approved in concept the program and scope of changes proposed by 
the Public Safety Building Design Committee and look forward to 
bringing the project to the 1995 Town Meeting. 

HOUSING AND LAND USE 

Lincoln, the Executive Office of Communities and Development 
(EOCD) and Lincoln House Associates finally reached agreement on the 
change in the mix of affordable and market rate units at Battle Road 
Farm. Construction has begun on Phase III. If the economy and 
housing market stay strong, this award-winning development should 
finally be completed. The Town terminated the leases of the two 
houses on Mill Street as the cost put them beyond the moderate income 



range. There was some discussion with the Housing Commission 
regarding changing the use of the Codman Farmhouse from congregate 
living, but it was decided to keep the current arrangement for now. 

The disposition of a major parcel of land of conservation 
interest was settled when the Van Leer property on Old Sudbury Road 
was bought by the Massachusetts Audubon Society and a private 
landowner. Both intend to keep the land in its current agriculture 
use. The Selectmen approved conservation restrictions on that 
property as well as several others in town. Our thanks to generous 
landowners who voluntarily give up their development rights, and 
thereby help Lincoln preserve open space at minimum cost to the Town. 

FISCAL MATTERS 

The FY 95 budget voted at the Annual Town Meeting was arrived at 
with relative ease. Once again there was no need for an override. 
It appears that the downsizing of the early nineties is over at least 
for now. A stabilization fund to help smooth out future tax 
increases was started. The Selectmen and the Finance Committee have 
agreed on a policy of managing the tax levy so that there is not a 
big jump in the tax rate when the principal payments for the major 
construction projects become due. 

Lincoln was notified of the awarding of several state grants in 
1994. The biggest is from the School Facilities & Management 
Services Bureau which will pay 54% of the cost of the school 
construction. In addition, two grants originally promised years ago 
for capping the landfill and building a road salt storage shed now 
seem to have been funded by the state legislature. Although one 
should never rely on state money until it is actually in the bank, 
the signs appear to be hopeful that the Town will finally receive its 
cash. Lastly, Lincoln was awarded about $425,000 over the next two 
years from a new state transportation bond for reimbursement for 
money spent on road repair. All of these grants will help with the 
maintenance and improvement of the Town's capital assets. 

COMMUNITY 

One of the perks of being a Selectman is to be able to 
participate in many townwide celebrations put on throughout the 
year. The Winter Carnival, Patriot's Day and Memorial Day events, 
the Fourth of July and the Codman Fair are opportunities for citizens 
of Lincoln of all ages and backgrounds to come together and celebrate 
our heritage and our joy in being a community. This year the Friends 
of the Library and the Lincoln Historical Society collaborated on a 
fabulous "Pickles to Pastures" tour of the town. It gave newcomers 
and long time residents alike insights into Lincoln's past, with 
vignette portraits of past residents and how they fit into the 
Lincoln of their times. 

The student exchange with Matadepera, our sister city in Spain, 
was revived last summer. Several students from the Brooks Middle 



School first hosted their Spanish counterparts, and then spent two 
weeks in Matadepera learning Spanish and a different culture, and 
just having fun as teenagers do. 

The Lincoln Cultural Council took the lead in raising funds for a 
new piano for Brooks Auditorium. Their townwide appeal and 
fundraising events were so successful that not only was a new piano 
purchased for school and community use in the auditorium, but there 
is almost enough money left over to repair the piano at Bemis Hall as 
well. Our thanks to the Codman Trustees whose matching gift helped 
put the project over the top. 

The editor of the Lincoln Journal changed twice during the year 
making for mixed coverage of Lincoln news and events during the 
transitions. Brad Skillman is now at the helm, and genuinely appears 
to want to make the Journal an accurate responsible local paper which 
meets townspeople's needs. The Selectmen will continue to work with 
the press so that it can do its job of informing the citizens of 
Lincoln. 

In conclusion, the Selectmen would like to thank everyone who 
helps make Lincoln such a special place to live. Board and Committee 
members, employees, leaders and participants in community groups, and 
those who just attend a meeting, write a letter to the editor or 
vote, all help to weave the fabric of the town and create the whole 
that is Lincoln. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 



Term Expires 



David M. Donaldson (deceased) 
Kenneth Bergen (appointed) 



1996 
1995 



TOWN CLERK 



Nancy J. Zuelke 



1995 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



John S. Kerr, II 

Peter C. Sugar 

Harriet B. Todd, Chairman 



1996 
1997 
1995 



TOWN TREASURER 



Roy M. Raja 



1995 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



L. Bruce Long 

Paul Marsh, Chairman 

William B. Stason 



1996 
1995 
1997 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



Roy M. Raja 



1995 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Stephen Johnson (appointed) 
Henry M. Morgan 
Terry Perlmutter 
Patrick Phillipps 
Patricia Salem, Chairman 
Leslie Vagliano (resigned) 



1996 
1995 
1997 
1996 
1995 
1996 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 



Ellin Fuller 

Andrew Hall, Chairman 

Margaret B. Marsh 



1997 
1995 
1996 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Perry Culver, M.D. 

Magruder C. Donaldson, Chairman 

Diane Haessler 



1996 
1995 
1997 



Term Expires 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



William C. Hewins 
Sarah Cannon Holden 
Janet Miller 
Geraldine C. Nogelo 
Frederick Pryor, Chairman 
David Wilson 



1997 
1997 
1996 
1995 
1996 
1995 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Martha DeNormandie, 
Natalie Faddoul 
Ann B. Janes 



Chairman 



1995 
1996 
1997 



PLANNING BOARD 



Crawley Cooper 
Margery P. Faran 
Dilla G. Tingley, 
Thomas C . Wang 
James B. White 



Chairman 



1997 
1995 
1999 
1998 
1996 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Henry Rugo 
Agnes Wiggin 



1995 
1995 



FENCE VIEWER 



Robert DeNormandie 



1995 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



Richard Churchill (resigned) 
Stephen Gray (appointed) 
Virginia M. Niles 
Conrad Todd 



1996 
1996 
1995 
1997 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



Dan P. Dimancescu 
Sara Mattes 
Irene Weigel 



1996 
1997 
1995 



10 



Term Expires 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Emily Althausen self-perpetuating 

Craig Hill, Chairman " " 

Douglas Harding " " 

Mary Nevmian (Resigned) " " 

Linda May (Elected by Town) 1995 

Ann Rote (School Committee's Appointee) 1997 

Bruce Bare (Selectmen's Appointee) 1996 

DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" Trustees 

Joseph L. Bower 1996 

Jonathan Cohen 1997 

Robert C. Frank 1995 

Heather D. Hill 1998 

"B" Trustees 

Laurie Dewey (Selectmen's Appointee) 1996 

Phyllis Rappaport (School Committee's Appointee ) 1995 

Barbara Sisson (Library Trustee's Appointee) 1997 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

Thomas Black (Appointed by the State) 1999 

Giles Browne, Chairman 1995 

Daniel Ladd (Selectmen's Appointee) 1999 

Katherine Preston 1995 

Betty-Jane Scheff (appointed) 1997 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John Adams, Chairman (Elected Post) 1995 

Donna Johnson (Elected Post) 1996 

Janet Maloney (Elected Post) 1997 

Kathleen S. Coleman (Selectmen's Appointee) 1996 

Anne Crosby (Selectmen's Appointee) 1997 

Richard Wiggin (Selectmen's Appointee) 1995 



11 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Term Expires 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

David W. Ramsay (retired) 1995 

Timothy S. Higgins (appointed) 1997 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT /FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Betty L. Lang (retired) 1996 

Suzanne C. Marchand (appointed) 1997 

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Blythe C. Robinson 1995 

TOWN COUNSEL 

David Dinwoodey 199 5 

Thomas Arnold 1995 

TOWN ENGINEER 

Frank C. Emmons, Jr. 1995 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Vincent DeAmicis 1995 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER DEPARTMENT 

Patrick Allen 1995 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR 

Virginia Noyes 1995 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Dominick James Arena 1995 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE-PROSECUTOR 

Charles E. Doyle 1995 

POLICE SERGEANT 

David Davis 1995 



12 



Allen Bowles 



INSPECTOR 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Term Expires 



1995 



Robert Gallo 
Richard J. Hallett 
Andrew Kennedy 
Gerald Mahoney 
Richard McCarty 
Kevin Mooney 
Thomas Mo ran 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 



CONSTABLES 



Dominick James Arena 
Charles E. Doyle 
Robert Paul Millian 
Barbara A. Hartnett 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 



DOG OFFICER 



Leslie Boardman 



1995 



FIRE CHIEF 



Dominick James Arena 



1995 



TREE WARDEN 
LOCAL SUPT. OF SHADE TREE MANAGEMENT 



Kenneth Bassett 



1995 



FOREST WARDEN 



Dominick James Arena 



1995 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 



Earl Midgley 



1995 



Earl Midgley 



Kenneth Desmond 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



WIRING INSPECTOR 



13 



1995 



1995 



Term Expires 
PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Russell J. Dixon 1995 

DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Thomas B. Mo ran 1995 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

David W. Ramsay (retired) 1994 

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Curtis A. Risley 1995 

ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

F. John Solman 1995 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 

Richard Goddard 1995 

VETERANS' AGENT 

1995 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 

1995 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret M. Martin 1995 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Peggy Elliot 1995 

Marshall Sandock 1997 

Eleanor M. Wilfert 1996 
Nancy J. Zuelke, Ex officio 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE 

Wendy Palu 1995 



14 



Term Expires 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Peter Conrad 1995 

Jonathan Donaldson 1997 

John Goodrich 1995 

Addie Kim 1997 

Christopher Klem 1995 

Barbara Ream (resigned) 1996 

Tara Tracy, Chairman 1996 

Thomas Walker (appointed) 1996 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Albert Avery 1997 

Selima Chandler 1996 

Barbara Cone, Chairman 1996 

Marian Cook 1997 

Shirley Drew 1996 

Marie Gavin 1995 

Allan Greaves 1995 

Barbara Grim 1997 

Russell Mahan, Secretary/Treasurer , 1995 

Ruth Morey 1997 

Marilyn O'Rourke 1997 

Wendy Palu 1995 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1995 

Eleanor Fitzgerald (Realtor) 1995 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1996 

Colin Smith, Chairman (District) 1997 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1996 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Elizabeth Donaldson (At Large) 1995 

Eleanor Fitzgerald (Realtor) 1995 

Kenneth Hurd (Architect) 1996 

Colin Smith, Chairman (District) 1997 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1996 

Thomas Wang (Planning Bd. ) 1995 

James White (Planning Bd. ) 1997 

Abigail Congdon, Alternate (District) 1996 

Alternate 1994 

PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Lynn Donaldson 1996 

William Shea 1995 

Judy Gross 1996 



15 



Term Expires 
LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Nancy Bower 1996 

Barbara Brannen, Co-chair 1995 

Paul Cook 1996 

Mary Crowe 1996 

Lynn Gargill 1995 

Judy Hall 1995 

Stephanie Rolfe 1996 

Margie J. Topf, Co-chair 1995 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION 

James Hogan, "At Large" Representative 1997 

Timothy Shea, Alternate 1995 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM AREA STUDY COMMITTEE (HATS) II 

Robert DeNormandie, Selectmen's Appointee 
Terrence Fenton, Member at Large 
Palmer Faran, Planning Board Appointee 
James Hogan, At Large (HFAC Rep.) 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

1994 
Harriet B. Todd, Alternate 1995 

REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 

William Constable 1995 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 
Harriet B. Todd 1995 

REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

Russel Hansen 1995 

, Alternate 1994 

REPRESENTATIVES TO CAMBRIDGE WATERSHED ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Harriet B. Todd (Selectmen) 1995 

Crawley Cooper (Planning Board) 1995 

Christopher Klem (Conservation Commission) 1995 

Christopher White (Conservation Commission) 1995 



16 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Term Expires 



Despena Billings 

Morton Braun 

Peter H. Guldberg 

Amalie Kass 

David Ries 

Buckner M. Creel, Associate Member 

F. John Solman, Associate Member 



1996 
1998 
1999 
1997 
1995 
1996 
1994 



CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



Neil Feinberg, 
Bruce Hoar 
Hema Jairam 
Kathy Madison 



Chairman 



1995 
1996 
1996 
1996 



ROUTE 12 8 AREA COMMITTEE 



Susan Carr 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

John Hammond 

Ann F. Ries, Chairman 

David Ries 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Barbara Beal (Representative of Friends of the Library) 

Elaine Bloom (Council on Aging Coordinator) 

Debra Haiduven (Recreation Director) 

Christel Ide (Representative of First Parish Church) 

Daniel Spaeth (Representative of Lincoln Players) 

Eleanor Wilfert (Representative of the Lincoln Grange), Chairman 

Blythe Robinson, Ex officio 



WATER MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Pat Allen 
Frank Emmons 
Ellin Fuller 
Andrew Hall 
Margaret B. Marsh 



17 



AQUIFER PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Rebecca Bartovics (Water Commission's Appointee) 

Jonathan Cohen (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Palmer Faran (Planning Board Rep) 

Peter Guldberg (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Joan Kimball (Conservation Rep) 

John Kimball, Co-Chairman (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Edward Rolfe (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Tara Tracy (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Andre Vagliano, Co-Chairman (Selectmen's Appointee) 

Frank Emmons, Ex Officio 

RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

John H. L. Bingham 

Dorothy Brennan 

Wesley Frost 

Roy Harvey, Chairman 

Hugo Liepmann 

Gwyn Loud 

THE MATADEPERA COMMITTEE 

Ann Parke 
Margaret-Ann Rice 
Susan Seeley 
Elizabeth Smith 

PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING DESIGN COMMITTEE 

Neil Middleton 

Joseph Robbat, Jr., Chairman 

David Whalen 



18 



SPECIAL POLICE 



Term Expires 



Leo Algeo 

John Barbetti 

Gary Bardsley 

Raymond Barnes 

Dennis A. Botelho 

Steven G. Carter 

Joseph Cavanaugh 

John Ciraso 

Robert Collina 

Arthur Cotoni 

Brian Cotoni 

Joseph Cotoni, Sr. 

Peter Dewey 

Frank Domenichella 

Joseph Driscoll 

Neil Duane 

Frank Emmons (Town Engineer) 

Gregory Fall 

John Finnerty 

Richard Goddard 

Frank Gordon, Jr. 

Frank Gordon, Sr. 

Ann Harrer (Conservation) 

Donald Hodgson 

James Kane 

Herbert Kelley, Jr. 

Jane Layton (Conservation) 

Steven Lennon 

Paul Lund 

Geoffrey McGean (Conservation) 

Earl Midgley (Building Inspector) 

Colin Moriarty 

Robert Morrison 

William Morrison 

Michael Murphy 

Theodore Poulos 

Daniel Reppucci (Conservation) 

Kenneth Rivers 

Timothy Robbins 

Richard Russes 

Diana Ryan (Conservation) 

Thomas C. Spencer 

Bradford Stowe 

Ronald Tolwinski 

Richard Turcotte 

Walter Van Wart 

John Whalen 

William Whalen, Jr. 

Eric Williams 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 



19 



Term Expires 



Jane Barnet 
Nancy Ritchie 



Cynthia Bouchard 



Cynthia Bouchard 
Charles Doyle 



Nancy J. Zuelke 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 
ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 

APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 
ASSISTANT TREASURER 

APPOINTED BY THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
DEPUTY COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
BURIAL AGENT 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



1995 
1995 



1995 



1995 
1995 



1995 



Jane Barnet 



1995 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Rosamond Delori 

Rainer Frost 

Georgine Herschbach 

Marcia A. Roehr 

Alvin Schmertzler, Chairman 

Gary Taylor 

Peter Watkinson 



1995 
1996 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1997 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Scott Lathrop, Chairman 
Kathryn Nicholson 
Ann Sutherland Ries 



1997 
1995 
1996 



REPRESENTATIVE TO MINUTEMAN REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



Harold Levey (Resigned) 



1995 



20 



Term Expires 
TAX EQUITY STUDY COMMITTEE 



Joanna Hopkins 

Robert Lincoln 

Emanuel Maier 

Kemon Taschioglou, Chairman 



TASK FORCE TO STUDY TOWN GOVERNMENT 



Kenneth Bassett 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Susan F. Brooks 
John French 
Edward Schwartz 
Janice Wyatt 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 
ROADSIDE PATH COMMITTEE 



James Storer 
Sonja Johansson 
Marcia Lee 
Mark Naiman 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD & THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TRAFFIC COMMITTEE 

Marilyn Brandt 
John Caswell 
Eleanor Fitzgerald 
Michael Frazier 
John Tylko 
Jane L. Ward 
Robert G. Wolf 

APPOINTED BY VARIOUS BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

James Birmingham (Moderator's Appointee) 1997 

Michaela Lipsey (Selectmen's Appointee) 1995 

Linda Pejchar (School Committee's Appointee) 1996 



21 



SCHOOL BUILDINGS COMMITTEE 



Douglas Adams 

Kenneth Bergen 

Esther Braun 

Susyrati Bunanta 

Daniel Cheever 

Maria Churchill 

Crawley Cooper 

Priscilla Damon 

Mark Deck 

Rita DiGiovanni 

Lynn Donaldson 

Earl Flansburgh 

George Georges 

Priscilla Kern 

Robert Lemire 

Sara Mattes 

Henry Morgan 

Patricia Salem, Chairman 

William Stason 

Laurence Zuelke 

BUNSAI-GAKUEN PROPERTIES 
SPECIAL OFFICERS 

John Brophy 
Robert A. Carter 
Michael Hailson 
Alice Harkins 
Anthony Lagos 
Alfred Lanoue 
Paul Liss 
Antonio Lopez 
Daniel J. Moore 
Paul Rose 

OTHER SPECIAL OFFICERS 

Matrons: Emily Hicks, Wendy Sullivan 

Minuteman Vocational High School Properties Only: Dennis Deeb and 
Randall Fox 

Audubon/Drumlin Properties Only: David Hill and Daniel Hart 

Cambridge Water Dept. Properties: Henry Manuel 

Details! Roland Anderson, Ronald Benotti, Thomas Healy, Walter 
Nelson, Robert Parker 



22 



TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. The duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections/ and 
notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned with 
appropriations which have been voted. 

As chief election official the Town Clerk oversees the 
preparation of all elections, administers campaign finance laws, 
certifies nomination papers and initiative petitions, and prepares 
the official election results for the Secretary of State. The Clerk 
supervises voter registration, conducts the annual town census, 
prepares the street list, voters list, school list, and furnishes the 
jury list to the Office of the Jury Commissioner. 

Since 1992 Lincoln has been one precinct. However, the state 
legislature has split the town into two congressional districts. The 
majority of the town is in the 7th Congressional District called 
precinct 1A, while a small portion remains in the 5th Congressional 
District called precinct IB. The portion in the 5th Congressional 
District consists of Bedford Lane - house #58, 60, all of Indian Camp 
Lane, all of North Commons, North Great Road - house #112, 142, Old 
Bedford Road - all except #17, all odd numbered houses on Virginia 
Road. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1994 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called to 
order in the Brooks School Auditorium on March 26, 1994 by the 
Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 9:35 a.m., and a quorum being 
present, (429 voters throughout the day) the following business was 
transacted: 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of 
Officers), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 28, 1994, in the 
Smith School Gymnasium, with the polls being open from 7:30 a.m. 
until 8 p.m. 

The Moderator brought before the Meeting consideration of those 
articles which have been placed on the Consent Calendar, copies of 
which were sent to the voters at least seven days before the Town 
Meeting. Articles 6, 7, 13, 14, 16, 20, 28, 29, 35, and 36 were held 
out. The other articles on the Consent Calendar (2, 3, 4, 15, 18, 
21, and 22) were then adopted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 

Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 



23 



VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That Agnes Wiggin and Henry Rugo be elected Measurers 
of Wood and Bark and Robert DeNormandie be elected Fence Viewer for 
the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 

Commissioners, and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be 

accepted. 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 

any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 

additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 

compensation of such members. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the Town 

for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1994, and ending June 30, 1995, 

be fixed at the following amounts: 

Town Clerk $500.00 

Treasurer and Collector 10.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 
Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ one of its 
members to work on assessing duties at a salary not to exceed 
$5,200., for the said fiscal period. 






ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
recommendations listed in the report of the Finance Committee, 
printed on pages 26 through 36, inclusive, of the Financial Section 
and Warrant for the 1994 Annual Town Meeting and that all items be 
raised by taxation except to the following extent and to the extent 
provided in a second motion to be made under this Article: 

Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000.00 to be taken from 
Water Department receipts, and $74,000.00 to be taken 
from the Air Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $6,688.00 to be taken from 
Conservation Commission Agency Account and $5,137.00 to 
be taken from the Wetlands Agency Account. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $60,000.00 to be 
taken from Metco funds. 



24 



Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - $94.00 
to be taken from the Grammar School Fund and $1,811.00 
to be taken from the Julian DeCordova School Equipment 
Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $1,829.00 to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 

Item 702 Cemetery - $5,000.00 to be taken from the Cemetery 
Improvement Fund and $675.00 to be taken from the 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund. 

Item 950- Water Department - $342,091.00 to be taken from 
956 Water Department receipts. 

The Total for General Purposes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1994, through June 30, 1995, is shown as $12,686,803.71. After the 
application of the special funds as listed above, the amount to be 
raised is $12,471,569.71. 

At the conclusion of action on all money articles it was voted by a 
majority voice vote as follows (as a second motion under Article 5) 

VOTED: That the sum of $331,371.00 be taken from Free Cash to 
reduce the total amount to be raised by taxation, as 
voted under the 

first motion under this Article 5. 

(This second motion was TABLED following the first vote under Article 
5 until the end of the meeting after action on all other money 
articles had been taken.) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, in addition to that authorized under 
Article 5 of this Warrant, to provide general pay increases for 
employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library 
Trustees, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $12,390.00 
to the Library, and $52,610.00 to the remaining Town departments for 
the fiscal year 1995, $2,111.00 of which is to be taken from Water 
Department receipts and the balance of which is to be raised by 
taxation, to provide general pay increases for employees as may be 
granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library Trustees. 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the 

Town's annual contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the 

2lementary school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, 

:>r take any other action relative thereto. 

70TED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen and the 

School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with the 



25 



Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school at Hanscom Air 
Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

An amendment to require payment of the $6.5 million before school 
starts and that Lincoln retain permanently $200,000.00 central 
administration cost even if Federal support is cut was defeated by a 
majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to support the following 

non binding resolution or take any other action 
relative thereto: Resolved that the 1994 Annual Town Meeting 
supports the Selectmen in their intention to proceed with the 
borrowing authorized under Article 8 of the 1993 Annual Town Meeting 
so that the school building project may begin July 1, 1994 or shortly 
thereafter. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

RESOLVED: That the Town supports the Selectmen in their 
intention to proceed with the borrowing authorized under Article 8 of 
the 1993 Annual Town Meeting so that the school building project may 
begin July 1, 1994. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, or any combination thereof, said monies to be put into the 

Town's Stabilization Fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 

$200,000.00 from Free Cash, said monies to be put into the Town's 

Stabilization Fund. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will hear and act upon the report of 

the Task Force on Town Governance, established pursuant 
to the vote under Article 15 of the 1993 Annual Town Meeting, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously as amended) 

That the Town accept the report of the Task Force on 
Town Governance and request the Moderator and Town Boards to take 
such actions as they deem appropriate to implement the 
recommendations contained in the report, in addition the Moderator or 
his appointee shall report to the 1995 Town Meeting on the progress 
of implementation of the Task Force's recommendations. 

The amendment to add the requirement of a report to the 1995 Town 
Meeting was passed by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, so that the Public 
Safety Building Design Committee can design and carry out necessary 
renovations to the Town's Public Safety Building, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 



26 



At 12:30 p.m. it was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to recess 
the Annual Town Meeting until the completion of a presentation 
regarding DeCordova Museum expansion plans and the Special Town 
Meeting. 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1994 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the Special Town Meeting was 
called to order by the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 1:45 
p.m. and a quorum being present the following business was transacted. 

ARTICLE 1. To make sure, before contracting for 11.85 million 

dollar refurbishing of Lincoln Schools that 5 things 
will have happened concerning: Consultation, Goals, 
Understandability, Cost and Grandfathering. 

1. Consultation: Having learned the spectrum of opinion of the 
customers we will have found out in detail what they ask that the 
School demand its graduates know and be able to do (this from all the 
students, and all their parents, and all the staff and 80% of the 
residents) . 

2. Goals: A prima-facie case has been made that the refurbished 
school is likely to achieve the long-stated philosophy of educating 
each student to his or her full potential. 

3. Understandability: That there be displayed soon, for the 90 
percent who can't understand blueprints, a huge, pool-table-sized, 
doll house. 

4. Cost: That design has been so economical that it will lead to no 
rise in per pupil cost in constant dollars. And further that the 
obscurity of state decree (no teaching in Hartwell pods or no aid) 
that adds a million to our cost has been cleared up. 

5. Grandfathering: That we get state assurance we will be 
grandfathered for next refurbishing - that they will not then say "If 
you teach in any part of '94 refurbished school, we won't give you a 
dime." 

DEFEATED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That we make sure that before we contract for a 11.85 
million dollar refurbishing of Lincoln Schools that 5 things will 
have happened concerning: Consultation, Goals, Understandability, 
Cost and Grandfathering. 



27 



1. Consulation: Having learned the spectrum of opinion of the 
customers we will have found out in detail what they ask that the 
School demand its graduates know and be able to do (this from all the 
students, and all their parents, and all the staff and 80% of the 
residents) . 

2. Goals: A prima-facie case has been made that the refurbished 
school is likely to achieve the long-stated philosophy of educating 
each student to his or her full potential. 

3. Understandability: That there be displayed soon, for the 90 
percent who can't understand blueprints, a huge, pool-table-sized, 
doll house. 

4. Cost: That design has been so economical that it will lead to no 
rise in per pupil cost in constant dollars. And further that the 
obscurity of state decree (no teaching in Hartwell pods or no aid) 
that adds a million to the cost has been cleared up. 

5. Grandfathering: That we get state assurance we will be 
grandfathered for next refurbishing - that they will not then say "If 
you teach in any part of '94 refurbished school, we won't give you a 
dime. " 



At the completion of Article 1 it was moved, seconded and unanimously 
voted to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 2:04 p.m. The Annual 
Town Meeting was reconvened and the following business transacted. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money, distinct from that authorized under 
Article 5 of the Warrant, to provide educational program enhancement 
consistent with the intent of the State Education Reform Act as 
determined by the School Committee. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $99,701.00 
from Free Cash, distinct from that authorized under Article 5 of the 
Warrant, to provide educational program enhancement consistent with 
the intent of the State Education Reform Act as determined by the 
School Committee. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by the 
Public Safety Departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or 
equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale 
or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote as amended) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $17,664.00 
said sum to be taken from Free Cash, to be used to purchase vehicles 



28 



and equipment for the public safety departments/ and to authorize the 
Selectmen to dispose by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and 
equipment. 

The amendment to reduce the amount appropriated from 35,328.00 to 
17,664.00 was passed by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 

borrowing or any combination thereof to be used for the construction, 

reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of the Town's roads, or 

take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $80,000.00 from 

Free Cash to be used for the construction, reconstruction, and/or 

maintenance and repair of the Town's roads. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used for the 
construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of roads 
and bridges, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town appropriate the sum of $132,670.00 from 
available funds under G.L. Chapter 90 pursuant to Chapter 33 of the 
Acts of 1991 to be used for the construction, reconstruction, and/or 
maintenance and repair of the Town's roads. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and apropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and 

maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $70,000. 

from Free Cash to be used for the repair and maintenance of certain 

Town buildings. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to approve the amount of 

the $1,950,000 debt authorized on March 8, 1994 by the 
Lincoln Sudbury Regional School Committee for the purpose of 
financing costs of reconstructing, equipping, remodeling and making 
extraordinary repairs to the regional high school, including costs 
incidental and related thereto, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town approve the amount of $1,950,000 debt 
authorized on March 8, 1994 by the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 
District School Committee for the purpose of financing costs of 
reconstructing, equipping, remodeling and making extraordinary 
repairs to the Rogers Theater, including costs incidental and related 
thereto, provided, however, that the aforesaid approval shall be 
subject to passage by the Town of a Proposition 2 1/2 debt exclusion 
respecting such borrowing. 



29 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by various 
departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and to see 
if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of 
excess vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $120,000. 
from Free Cash, to be used to purchase vehicles and equipment for 
various departments, and to authorize the Selectmen to dispose by 
sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for professional 

services and other expenses with respect to Hanscom Area Traffic 

Study (II), or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 

from Free Cash for professional services and other expenses with 

respect to Hanscom Area Traffic Study (II). 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 

money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any other combination thereof, to be used for the 
construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of the 
Town's roadside paths, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (By a majority voice vote as amended) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $31,000.00 
from Free Cash, to be used for the construction, reconstruction, 
and/or maintenance and repair of the Town's roadside paths, a portion 
of which shall be used to purchase two snowblowers for the purpose of 
maintaining said paths in winter. 

Another amendment regarding maintenance after snowfall was defeated 
by a majority voice vote. 

At 4:30 p.m. it was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to adjourn 
the meeting until Tuesday, March 29, 1994 at 7:30 p.m. 



30 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 28, 1994 

In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the Polls were opened at 7:30 a.m. by Town Clerk, Nancy J. 
Zuelke. The following Wardens assisted Mrs. Zuelke throughout the 
day: Thomas Coan, Peggy Elliott, Marshall Sandock, Eleanor Wilfert 
and Larry Zuelke. The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The 
total number of votes was 370 with the following results: 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



Town Clerk (1 yr) 



Nancy J. Zuelke 
Blanks 



328 
_42 
370 



Board of Selectmen 
(3 yrs.) 



Peter C. Sugar 
Blanks 



313 
_57 
370 



Town Treasurer 
(1 yr.) 



Roy M. Raja 
Blanks 



264 
106 
370 



Board of Assessors 
(3 yrs.) 



William B. Stason 
Blanks 



293 

77 

370 



Board of Assessor; 
(2 yrs.) 



L. Bruce Long, Jr, 
Blanks 



290 

80 

370 



School Committee 
(3 yrs.) 



Terry Perlmutter 
Blanks 



305 

65 

370 



Water Commissioner 
(3 yrs.) 



Ellin Fuller 
Ellen Grant 
Scattering 
Blanks 



29 

11 

4 

326 

370 



Board of Health 
(3 yrs) 



Diane Haessler 
Blanks 



299 

71 

370 



Cemetery Commissioner 
(3 yrs.) 



Ann Janes 

Scattering 

Blanks 



257 
3 

110 
370 



31 



Of f i c e 



Candidate 



Total 



Planning Board 
(5 yrs.) 



Dilla G. Tingley 
Blanks 



303 

J&I 

370 



Commissioner of Trust Funds Conrad H. Todd 
(3 yrs. ) Blanks 



290 
370 



Trustee of Bemis Fund 
(3 yrs.) 



Sara Mattes 
Blanks 



289 

370 



Trustee DeCordova & Dana 
Museum (4 yrs . ) 



Heather D. Hill 
Blanks 



295 
J75. 
370 



Housing Commission 
(3 yrs.) 



Scattering 
Blanks 



1 
3_£9_ 
370 



Recreation Committee 
(3 yrs.) 



Janet Maloney 
Blanks 



294 
370 



Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
School Dist. (2) 
(3 yrs.) 



William C. Hewins 
Sarah Cannon Holden 
Blanks 



254 
327 
A59 
740 



Question 1 "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt from 
the provisions of Proposition two and one-half, so 
called, the amounts required to pay for the Town's 
apportioned share of the bonds issued by the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District in order to 
finance costs of reconstructing, equipping, remodeling 
and making extraordinary repairs to the regional high 
school?" 

Total 



Yes 

No 
Blanks 



249 
98 

370 



32 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
March 29, 1994 

On Tuesday, March 29, 1994 the adjourned session of the March 26, 
1994 Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:34 p.m. by the 
Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, and a quorum being present, (201 
voters throughout the evening), the following business was transacted. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by the 
Town's Department of Public Works for the purchase of vehicle fuel 
pumps and/or equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the 
disposal by sale or otherwise of excess vehicle fuel pumps and 
equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 
from Free Cash, to be used to purchase vehicle fuel pumps and/or 
equipment, and to authorize the Selectmen to dispose by sale or 
otherwise of excess vehicle fuel pumps and equipment. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by the 
Town's Recreation Department for the purchase of pool filters and/or 
equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale 
or otherwise of excess pool filters and equipment, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $35,000.00 
from Free Cash, to be used to purchase pool filters and/or equipment, 
and to authorize the Selectmen to dispose by sale or otherwise of 
excess pool filters and equipment. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said monies to be 

used for the settlement of a claim to which the Town is a party, or 

take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 

from Free Cash, said monies to be used for the settlement of an 

employee claim to which the Town is a party. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 

providing a one-day Town-wide hazardous waste collection day or take 

any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 

from Free Cash, for the purpose of providing a one-day Town-wide 

hazardous waste collection day. 



33 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 

funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the repair and 

maintenance of Hartwell School, or take any other action relative 

thereto. 

VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $8,000.00 

from Free Cash, for the repair and maintenance of Hartwell School. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used for the 
construction, reconstruction and/or maintenance and repair of Library 
Lane, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously as amended) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 
from Free Cash for the construction, reconstruction, and/or 
maintenance and repair of Library Lane, provided that a portion of 
said sum shall be used to provide adequate lighting on Library Lane. 

The amendment adding the provision of adequate lighting on Library 
Lane was passed unanimously. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the environmental 
study and analysis of the site at the Lincoln Public Schools on 
Ballfield Road and for the development and implementation of a plan 
for remediation of any contamination, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $35,000.00 
from Free Cash to enable the School Committee to conduct an 
environmental study and analysis of the site at the Lincoln Public 
Schools on Ballfield Road and develop and implement a plan for 
remediation of any contamination discovered at the site. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of 
undertaking necessary remodeling and/or repairs to the Town's school 
buildings in order to improve access to handicapped persons, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, said monies to be 
used for the purchase of equipment for the Lincoln Schools to enhance 
the education of students, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 



34 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to alter the sources of 

funding for the construction of a CT disinfection 
facility for the Flint's Pond water supply, authorization for which 
construction and funding was previously given by vote adopted under 
Article 1 of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town Meeting, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $105,000 
from Water Department Surplus, in order to supplement $450,000 
previously appropriated from Water Department Surplus under Article 1 
of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town Meeting for the 
purpose of constructing a CT Disinfection Facility for the Flint's 
Pond water supply; and that the Town also vote to reduce the amount 
previously authorized to be borrowed for said purpose under Article 1 
of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town Meeting from a sum 
of $1,080,000.00 to a sum of $975,000.00. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, for the design, 
purchase and installation of various water quality treatment systems 
in the Town's water system, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $25,000.00 
from Water Department surplus for the design, purchase and 
installation of various water quality treatment systems in the Town's 
water system. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 

sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to compensate the 
Town's Conservation Trust Fund for the transfer of certain land 
previously under the jurisdiction of the Conservation Commission to 
the Water Commissioners, said transfer having been previously voted 
under Article 2 of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town 
Meeting for the purpose of constructing and operating thereon water 
treatment facilities, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw, 

including Section 6.6.2 (j) and Section 14.3.1, to 
allow the special permitting of accessory apartments in Rl Cluster 
Developments, the text of which proposed amendment is available for 
inspection at the Office of the Town Clerk, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw, in order 
to allow the special permitting of accessory apartments in Rl Cluster 
Developments by amending Sections 6.6.2 (j) and 14.3.1 thereof as 
follows (new language is underlined ) : 



35 



Section 6.6.2 (j) All dwelling units shall be in detached buildings 
and there shall not be more than one dwelling unit in a building 
except as allowed in Section 14.3.1 . 

Section 14.3.1 An owner or owners of a single-family dwelling in an 
R-l District or an R-l Cluster Development may, after consultation 
with the Planning Board, apply to the Board of Appeals for a special 
permit for the construction and occupancy of an accessory dwelling 
unit in such single-family dwelling or in an accessory building, the 
accessory dwelling unit thus created being hereinafter referred to in 
this subsection 14.3 as an apartment. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend section 14.3 of 

the Town of Lincoln's Zoning By-Law , as originally 
adopted March 4, 1929, and last amended by the 1991 Annual Town 
Meeting as follows: 

1. Delete 14.3.2(f) in its entirety and replace if with the 
following: 

(Underlined sections are new. ) 

(f) the building in which the apartment is to be constructed and the 
building in which the main residence is located existed on January 1, 
1994 , provided that an addition which is made after January 1, 1994 
to a building which was in existence on that date shall be deemed to 
be a part of the building provided that the addition does not 
increase the floor area or volume of the original building by more 
than 10% except as provided in Section 14.3.8 and provided further 
that the addition will not alter the character of the building; 
notwithstanding the foregoing, a special permit may be issued for an 
accessory apartment in buildings constructed after January 1, 1994, 
provided that the building in which the apartment is to be 
constructed and the building in which the main residence is located 
have been in existence for no less than 15 years . 

2. Delete the date "January 1, 1984," as it appears in section 
14.3.8 and replace it with " January 1, 1994 ." 

3. Add a new section to be numbered section 14.3.11 and to read as 
follows: No more than 150 special permits for accessory apartments 
shall be issued. This limitation shall not apply to special permits 
issued pursuant to section 14.3.8 or 14.3.9 . 

Or do or take any other action on this matter. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 

of Chapter 653, section 40 of the Acts of 1989 which 
allows assessment of new construction erected between January 2nd and 
June 30th for the Fiscal Year beginning on July 1st, to be effective 
Fiscal Year 1996, or take any action relative thereto. 



36 



VOTED: (By Majority Voice Vote) 

That the Town vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 
653, section 40 of the Acts of 1989 which allows assessment of new 
construction erected between January 2nd and June 30th for the Fiscal 
Year beginning on July 1st, to be effective Fiscal Year 1996. 

ARTICLE 36 . To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 71, 
section 83 of the General Laws, in order to participate 
in the Early Retirement Program for teachers in the Lincoln Public 
Schools as authorized under the Education Reform Act of 1993, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to accept Chapter 71, section 83 of 
the General Laws, in order to permit the Town to offer the Early 
Retirement Incentive Program for teachers in the Lincoln Public 
Schools as authorized under the Education Reform Act of 1993. 

ARTICLE 37. To hear the report of the Tax Equity Study Committee, 

and to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof, to reimburse the 
Committee for expenses in conducting its Town-wide survey, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town accept the report of the Tax Equity Study 
Committee and vote to appropriate the sum of $600.00 from Free Cash 
to be used to reimburse the Committee for expenses in conducting its 
Town -wide survey. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to install two "Stop" 
signs on Lincoln Road, one on each side of the 

intersection with Codman Road; thus, together with the two present 

"Stop" signs on Codman Road, creating a four-way stop, or take any 

other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 39. That, within 60 days, the Selectmen shall hold a public 

meeting and choose a replacment for the Town's 
existing Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans. This plan will be the most 
cost-effective indemnity plan, the benefits of which are materially 
the same, or better than the existing Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans. 
At the time of enrollment, the new indemnity plan shall also be 
offered to the town employees who are currently enrolled in the 
Town's HMO plan; or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 



37 



ARTICLE 40. To sec if the Town will vote t.o reinstate the elected 

position of Tree Warden, to serve for a term of three 

years, and to amend its bylaws, if necessary; or to take any other 

action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously sense of the meeting resolution) 

RESOLVED: That this Town Meeting request that the 

Selectmen, in annually appointing a Tree Warden, seek the 

recommendations of the Planning Board and the Conservation Commission 

and assure that the appointee have educational as well as practical 

experience in the care and maintenance of trees. 

At various stages of the Meeting, tribute was paid to several 
officers as follows: 

Toby Hayes retiring from the Finance Committee 

Peter Sugar retiring from the Finance Committee to become a Selectman 

Agnes Wiggin retiring from the School Committee 

Robert Denormandie retiring from the Board of Selectmen 

Tribute was also paid to elected officials who died during the past 
year - Malcolm Donaldson, Douglas Burckett, and Sargent Janes. 

There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it was 
moved, seconded and unanimously voted to dissolve the Meeting at 9:45 
p.m. 



38 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 20, 1994 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following wardens: Thomas Coan, Shirley 
Drew, Peggy Elliott, Irving Telling, Julie Vercollone, Eleanor 
Wilfert. The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. 
Zuelke. The total number of votes cast was 1191, which was divided 
as follows: Precinct 1A (District 7): Republican - 396, Democratic 
- 766, for a total of 1161; Precinct IB (District 5): Republican - 
15, Democratric - 14 for a total of 29, with the following results: 

Republican 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



Senator in Congress 



John R. Lakian 
W. Mitt Romney 
Blanks 



36 
322 
_53 
411 



Governor 



William F. Weld 
Blanks 



349 
_62 
411 



Lieutenant Governor 



Argeo Paul Cellucci 
Blanks 



351 

60 

411 



Attorney General 



Janis M. Berry 
Guy A. Carbone 
Blanks 



203 
125 
_83 
411 



Secretary of State 



Arthur E. Chase 
Peter V. Forman 
Blanks 



161 
154 
_96 
411 



Treasurer 



Joseph Daniel Malone 
Blanks 



323 
_88 
411 



Auditor 



Forrester A. M Tim M Clark, Jr, 

Earle B. Stroll 

Blanks 



182 
106 
123 

411 



39 



Office 



Candidate 



Ifltftl 



Rep. in Congress 
(7th District) 



Brad Bailey 
Patricia H. Long 
Blanks 



253 
79 

396 



Rep. in Congress 
(5th District) 



David E. Coleman 
Blanks 



11 

Jk 
15 



Councillor 

(3rd District) 



William M. Monnie 
Blanks 



256 

!£5_ 
411 



Senator in Gen. Court Lucile "Cile" P. Hick! 
(5th Middlesex Dist.) Blanks 



337 
J74 

411 



Rep. in Gen. Court Brian M. Spencer 
(15th Middlesex Dist.) Blanks 



275 
136 

411 



District Attorney Blanks 
(Northern District) 



411 



Clerk of Courts Blanks 
(Middlesex County) 



411 



Register of Deeds Jane Sullivan Savery 
Middlesex South Dist. Blanks 



254 
157 
411 



County Commissioner 
(Middlesex County) 



Blanks 



411 



Office 



Democratic 
Candidate 



Total 



Senator in Congress 



Edward M. Kennedy 

Scattering 

Blanks 



616 

1 

163 

780 



Governor 



George A. Bachrach 
Michael J. Barrett 
Mark Roosevelt 
Scattering 
Blanks 



244 
159 
198 
1 
128 
780 



40 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



Lieutenant Governor 



Attorney General 



Secretary of State 



Treasurer 



Auditor 



Rep. in Congress 
(7th District) 



Rep. in Congress 
(5th District) 



Councillor 

(3rd District) 



Marc D. Draisen 
Robert K. Massie 
Blanks 



L. Scott Harshbarger 
Blanks 



William Francis Galvin 
Augusto F. Grace 
Blanks 



Shannon P. O'Brien 
Blanks 



A. Joseph DeNucci 
Blanks 



Edward J. Mar key 
Blanks 



Martin T. Meehan 
Thomas J. Quinn 
Blanks 



Cynthia S. Creem 
Joseph M. Downs, Jr 
Robert A. Kahn 
Jackie Morrissey 
Blanks 



Senator in Gen. Court Scattering 
(5th Middlesex Dist.) Blanks 



Rep. in Gen. Court James M. Dunn 
(15th Middlesex Dist.) Susan C. Fargo 

Jay R. Kaufman 
Blanks 



District Attorney Thomas F. Reilly 
(Northern District) Blanks 



41 



159 
384 
237 
780 

650 
130 
780 

181 
312 
287 
780 

427 
353 
780 

439 
341 
780 

593 
173 
766 

10 

1 

-A 

14 

329 

21 

68 

53 

309 

780 

1 
779 
780 

23 
545 
175 

37 
780 

403 
377 
780 



Office 



Candidate 



TQt gl 



Clerk of Courts 

(Middlesex County) 



Edward J. Sullivan 
James P. Kennedy 
Blanks 



287 
139 
354 
780 



Register of Deeds 
Middlesex South Dist. 



Eugene C. Brune 
John S. Kennedy 
Douglas John Murray 
Blanks 



216 
43 
121 
400 
780 



County Commissioner 
(Middlesex County) 



Francis X. Flaherty 
Gerald J. Flynn, Jr. 
Douglas E. MacDonald 
John M. MacGillivray 
Blanks 



210 

37 

22 

97 

414 

780 



The total number of registered voters for this election was 3243 



42 



STATE ELECTION 
November 8, 1994 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open at 
7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following wardens: Thomas Coan, Peggy 
Elliott, Marshall Sandock, Eleanor Wilfert, Larry Zuelke. The Polls 
were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The total number 
of votes cast was 2753, with 2649 in Precinct 1A and 104 in Precinct 
IB. Total number of registered voters was 3371. Results are as 
follows : 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



United States Senator 



Governor /Lieut 
Governor 



Attorney General 



Secretary of State 



Edward M. Kennedy 
W. Mitt Romney 
Lauraleigh Dozier 
William A. Ferguson, Jr. 
Blanks 



Weld & Cellucci 
Roosevelt & Massie 
Cook & Crawford 
Rebello & Giske 
Blanks 



L. Scott Harshbarger 
Janis M. Berry 
Blanks 



Arthur E. Chase 
William Francis Galvin 
Peter C. Everett 
Blanks 



1441 

1030 

19 

1 

262 

2753 

1754 

840 

14 

2 

143 

2753 

1904 
692 
157 

2753 

1092 

1163 

75 

423 

2753 



Treasurer 



Auditor 



Joseph Daniel Malone 
Shannon Patricia O'Brien 
Susan B. Poulin 
Thomas P. Tierney 
Blanks 



A. Joseph DeNucci 
Forrester A. "Tim* 
Geoff M. Weil 
Blanks 



Clark, Jr 



1652 

763 

54 

33 

251 

2753 

1451 

845 

98 

359 

2753 



43 



Office 



Candidate 



Total 



Rep. in Congress 
5th District 



Martin T. Meehan 
David E. Coleman 
Blanks 



62 

31 

11 

104 



Rep. in Congress 
7th District 



Edward J. Markey 
Brad Bailey 
Blanks 



1431 

1009 

209 

2649 



Councillor 3rd District Cynthia S. Creem 

William M. Monnie 
Blanks 



Senator in Gen. Court Lucile "Cile" P. Hicks 
5th Middlesex Dist. Susan Fargo 

Blanks 



Rep. in General Ct. Jay R. Kaufman 
15th Middlesex Dist. Brian M. Spencer 

Blanks 



District Attorney Thomas F. Reilly 
Northern District Blanks 



1120 
943 
690 

2753 

1705 
342 
706 

2753 

1470 
959 
324 

2753 

1840 

913 

2753 



Clerk of Courts 

Middlesex County 



Edward J. Sullivan 
Blanks 



1518 
1235 
2753 



Register of Deeds Eugene C. Brune 
Middlesex South Dist. Jane S. Savery 

Blanks 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County 



Francis X. Flaherty 
Barbara J. Collins 
Blanks 



1028 

1103 

622 

2753 

1118 
905 
730 

2753 



Question 1 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 



Do you approve of a law summarized below, 
taken by the Senate or the House of Repres 
4, 1994? 



on which no vote was 
entatives before May 



44 



SUMMARY 

This proposed law would limit the way in which business and 
certain nonprofit corporations could contribute to and spend 
money on campaigns involving an initiative/ referendum or other 
question submitted to the voters at a state or local election. 
The proposed law would require ballot committees organized to 
support or oppose any question submitted to the voters to 
disclose promptly certain contributions made late in the 
campaign; would establish procedures that business and certain 
nonprofit corporations would have to follow in order to spend 
money on ballot question campaigns; and would establish 
voluntary spending limits for ballot committees. 

The proposed law would require a ballot committee to report to 
the state Office of Campaign and Political Finance, within one 
business day of receipt, the name, address, occupation and 
employer of any person or organization making a contribution of 
$1,000 or more, if the contribution was made before the date of 
the election but after the closing date of the last official 
campaign contribution report. 

Under the proposed law, business and certain nonprofit 
corporations would be prohibited from making contributions or 
expenditures to support or oppose a ballot question, but would 
be permitted to create and solicit contributions to a separate 
fund to be used to support or oppose a ballot question. A 
separate fund would be required for each ballot question on 
which the corporation intended to solicit contributions. The 
corporation would be required to report all amounts spent to 
establish and administer the fund to the Office of Campaign and 
Political Finance, and to a city or town if the fund were 
established to influence the vote on a local ballot question. 

Contributions to the separate fund could be solicited only from 
members or stockholders, officers and directors, and employees 
at a policymaking, managerial or professional level. Coercion, 
job discrimination and financial reprisals as methods of 
soliciting contributions would be prohibited. Nonprofit 
corporations that are formed for the purpose of promoting 
political ideas, do not engage in business activities, have no 
shareholders, and do not have business corporations as members 
or accept more than one percent of their revenues from such 
corporations would be exempt from these provisions. A business 
organization that violated these requirements could be fined up 
to $50,000, and any director or agent of a business 
organization who violates or authorizes the violation of these 
requirements could be fined up to $10,000 and/or imprisoned for 
up to one year. 

The proposed law would establish voluntary spending limits for 
ballot committees at $1,000,000 in the year of an election, and 
$250,000 in the years immediately before and after an 



45 



election. Ballot committees agreeing to observe these voluntary 
limits would be permitted to announce their compliance on 
advertisements and campaign materials. Ballot committees that agreed 
to observe the spending limits and later exceeded the limits could be 
fined up to $10,000. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were 
declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 

Yes 1061 

No 1507 

Blanks 185 

2753 

Queston 2 REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LAW 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by 
the House of Representatives on January 4, 1994, by a vote of 
105 to 49, and approved by the Senate on January 4, 1994, by a 
vote of 26 to 11? 

SUMMARY 

This law requires drivers and passengers in certain motor 
vehicles on public ways to wear properly adjusted and fastened 
safety belts. The law applies to persons driving or riding in 
private passenger motor vehicles or riding in vanpool vehicles 
or trucks under 18,000 pounds. It also applies to employees of 
cities, towns, counties, and districts. The law does not apply 
to: (1) children under twelve years old who are required by 
another state law to use safety belts or other child passenger 
restraints; (2) vehicles manufactured before July 1, 1966; (3) 
persons certified by a physician as physically unable to use 
safety belts; (4) U.S. Postal Service rural carriers while 
performing their duties; (5) persons involved in operating 
taxies, liveries, tractors, trucks of 18,000 pounds or more, 
buses; or (6) passengers in authorized emergency vehicles. 

The law is enforced by law enforcement agencies only when a 
driver has been stopped for a motor vehicle violation or some 
other offense. A driver and each passenger 16 years old or 
older may be fined $25 for not using a safety belt when 
required. A driver may also be fined $25 for each passenger 
between 12 and 16 years old who is not using a safety belt when 
required. A person who receives a citation for violating the 
law may challenge it using the same procedure that applies to 
most other automobile law violations. A violation is not 
considered a moving violation for motor vehicle insurance 
surcharge purposes. 



46 



The law directs the state Registrar of Motor Vehicles to 
require police officers, when reporting automobile accidents/ 
to record whether safety belts were used. The law directs the 
Governor's Highway Safety Bureau to (1) conduct a public 
information and education program on motor vehicle occupant 
protection; (2) evaluate and report to the Legislature, by June 
1, 1995, on the effectiveness of and degree of compliance with 
the law; and (3) make annual surveys of safety belt use. 

The law requires the state Commissioner of Insurance to 
evaluate, report, and make recommendations to the Legislature 
concerning the effectiveness of the law and the frequency of 
bodily injury claims during the law's first year of operation. 
The Commissioner must also require at least a 5% reduction in 
bodily injury insurance premiums if the observed safety belt 
use rate among all vehicle occupants is 50% or more after the 
law's first year of operation. The Commissioner is required to 
take into account the annual safety belt use survey results in 
future decisions setting bodily injury premiums, and the 
Commissioner must further reduce those premiums if the safety 
belt use rate in Massachusetts exceeds the national average. 

The law provides that failure to wear a properly fastened 
safety belt may not be considered as contributory negligence or 
used as evidence in any civil lawsuit. It also states that no 
insurance company may either (1) deny coverage to a person who 
failed to wear a safety belt during an accident that led to 
bodily injury, or (2) refuse to issue a motor vehicle liability 
policy based on a violation of this law. 

Yes 2037 

No 588 

Blanks 128 

2753 

Question 3 REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LAW 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by 
the House of Representatives on May 28, 1993 by a vote of 112 
to 39, and approved by the Senate on June 23, 1993 by a vote of 
20 to 19? 

SUMMARY 

This law eliminates one of the two ways in which students may 
authorize fees to be assessed on tuition bills at 
state-operated colleges and universities to support nonpartisan 
student organizations that attempt to influence state 
legislation. 



47 



The law applies to community and state colleges and the 
University of Massachusetts. The law takes the place of 
previous law that allowed a student body, by a majority vote in 
an official student body referendum, to authorize a "waivable 
fee," or (at state colleges and the University) an "optional 
fee," to be collected for such nonpartisan student 
organizations. Under this law, the boards of trustees at 
community and state colleges and the University are prohibited 
from collecting waivable fees and may only collect optional 
fees for such organizations. 

A "waivable fee" is collected when authorized by a majority of 
those students voting in an official student body referendum. 
A waivable fee is an amount payable on a tuition bill, 
appearing as a separately assessed item and accompanied by a 
statement that the fee is not a charge required to be paid by 
the student but rather that the student may deduct the charge 
from the total amount due. The tuition bill also explains the 
nature of the fee and states that the fee appears on the bill 
at the request of the student body and does not necessarily 
reflect the endorsement of the board of trustees. 

An "optional fee" is collected when authorized by a majority of 
those students voting in an official student body referendum. 
An optional fee is an amount payable on a tuition bill, 
appearing as a separately assessed item and accompanied by a 
statement that the fee is not a charge required to be paid by 
the student but rather that the student may add the charge to 
the total amount due. The tuition bill also explains the 
nature of the fee and states that the fee appears on the bill 
at the request of the student body and does not necessarily 
reflect the endorsement of the board of trustees. 

Yes 1385 

No 1082 

Blanks 286 

2753 

Question 4 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 
4, 1994? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would prevent the name of a person from being 
printed on a state primary or general election ballot as a 
candidate for one of a number of specified state and federal 
public offices, if the person had already served a certain 
number of consecutive terms in that office within a fixed 
period preceding the end of the then-current term of office. 
If such a person were still elected by a write-in vote to one 



48 



of the state offices (except the office of Governor), the 
person would serve without a salary, and in some of the state 
offices, without payment for certain expenses. 

Under the proposed law, the name of a person could not be 
printed on a primary or general election ballot as a candidate 
for the office of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of 
State, State Treasurer, State Auditor, or State Attorney 
General, if the person had served two consecutive terms (eight 
years) in that office in the eleven years prior to the end of 
the then-current term of office. The name of a person could 
not be printed on a primary or general election ballot as a 
candidate for the office of Governor's Councillor, State 
Representative, State Senator, or United State Representative 
from Massachusetts, if the person had served four consecutive 
terms (eight years) in that office in the nine years prior to 
the end of the then-current term of office. The name of a 
person could not be printed on a primary or general election 
ballot as a candidate for the office of United States Senator 
from Massachusetts, if the person had served two consecutive 
terms (twelve years) in that office in the seventeen years 
prior to the end of the then-current term of office. The 
proposed law would not prevent any voter from casting a 
write-in vote for any person as a candidate for any office. 

If a person made ineligible by the proposed law to have his or 
her name printed on the ballot as a candidate for the office of 
Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, State 
Auditor, State Attorney General, Governor's Councillor, State 
Representative or State Senator were still elected to that 
office by write-in vote, the person would serve without a 
salary. If such a person were elected to the office of 
Lieutenant Governor, Governor's Councillor, State 
Respresentative or State Senator, the person would also serve 
without payment for certain expenses. 

The current terms of the persons serving as Governor, 
Lieutenant Governor, Governor's Councillor, State 
Representative, State Senator, United States Representative 
from Massachusetts, and United States Senator from 
Massachusetts, would not be counted for purposes of the 
proposed law. The terms of the persons elected in 1990 to the 
office of Secretary of State, State Treasurer, State Auditor, 
or State Attorney General would be counted. 

Any person who served more than half of a term in an office 
would be treated as having served a full term in that office. 
Any person who resigned from an office would be treated as 
having served a full term. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were 
found invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 



49 



Yes 1122 

No 1447 

Blanks 184 

2753 

Question 5 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 
4, 1994? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow retail stores to open at any time 
on Sundays and on the legal holidays of Memorial Day, July 
Fourth, and Labor Day. It would not affect current 
restrictions on the sale of alcoholic beverages on Sundays and 
these holidays. Stores opening under the proposed law would be 
required to make Sunday and holiday work voluntary and would be 
required to pay most employees at least one and one-half times 
their regular rate. 

Yes 1498 

No 1139 

Blanks 116 

2753 

Question 6 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the 
constitution, summarized below, which was approved by the 
General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate on November 16, 1992, by a vote of 132 to 39, 
and on May 25, 1994, by a vote of 119 to 73? 

SUMMARY 
This proposed consitutional amendment would require 
Massachusetts income tax rates to be graduated, in order to 
distribute the burden of the tax fairly and equitably. The 
proposed amendment would require the rates for taxpayers in 
higher income brackets to be higher than the rates for 
taxpayers in lower income brackets. The proposed amendment 
would also allow the state Legislature to grant reasonable 
exemptions and abatements and establish the number and range of 
tax brackets. The proposed amendment would eliminate from the 
Massachusetts Constitution the present requirement that income 
taxes must be levied at a uniform rate throughout the state 
upon incomes derived from the same class of property. 

Yes 736 

No 1863 

Blanks 154 

2753 



50 



Question 7 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 
4, 1994? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would change the state personal income tax 
laws if a proposed amendment to the Massachusetts Constitution 
requiring income tax rates to be graduated is approved at the 
1994 state election. This proposed law would (1) set graduated 
income tax rates to replace the existing tax rate structure, 
(2) change exemptions and deductions relating to dependents, 
child care expenses, head of household status and personal 
exemptions, (3) establish a property tax and water rate credit 
of up to $200 for taxpayers below certain income levels, (4) 
increase the maximum income levels for no-tax status and the 
limited income credit, (5) establish a "capital formation 
incentive" to replace the existing capital gains exclusion, and 
(6) provide that taxpayers will not pay more Massachusetts 
income tax for 1995 than they would have paid under 1992 law, 
if their 1995 adjusted gross income is below certain levels 
(for instance $60,000 for single filers and $100,000 for 
married couples filing jointly) . 

(1) PROPOSED GRADUATED INCOME TAX RATES WOULD: 

set the following state tax rates for all Massachusetts taxable 
income (after subtracting applicable deductions and expemption) : 
Tax single married married head of 
Rate filing filing household 

Jointly separately 

up to up to up to up to 
5.5% $50,200 $81,000 $40,500 $60,100 

8.8% over over over over 

$50,200 $81,000 $40,500 $60,100 

up to up to up to up to 

$90,000 $150,000 $75,000 $120,000 

9.8% over over over over 

$90,000 $150,000 $75,000 $120,000 

A taxpayer whose total taxable income exceeded the upper limit 
for the 5.5% or 8.8% income bracket would still be taxed at the 
lower rate for income within that bracket. For example, a 
single person with $100,000 in taxable income would be taxed at 
5.5% on $50,200 of that income, at 8.8% on the next $39,800, 
and at 9.8% on the remaining $10,000 of that income. The 
income brackets would be increased annually, starting in 1996, 
to account for changes in the cost of living. 



51 



Eliminate the existing division of Massachusetts income into 
Part A income (generally, dividends, capital gains, and certain 
interest), currently taxed at 12 percent, and Part B income 
(all other income), currently taxed at 5.95 percent. 

Create a "head of household" filing status for single persons 
who have dependents and who file federal returns as heads of 
households . 

Prevent any gain from the sale of a taxpayer's principal 
residence from being taxed by the state at a rate higher than 
6%. 

Provide that non-residents would pay tax on their Massachusetts 
income based on the income rate brackets applicable to their 
total income (including Massachusetts and other income). 

(2) PROPOSED CHANGES IN EXEMPTIONS, DEDUCTIONS AND CREDITS 
WOULD ; 

Replace the child and dependent care expense deduction with a 
child and dependent care tax credit egual to 60% of the federal 
child and dependent care tax credit. 

Increase the existing exemption for each claimed dependent from 
$1,000 to $2,000. 

Allow heads of households a personal exemption of $3,400, plus 
$2,200 if blind and $700 if 65 years of age or over. 

Reduce personal exemptions gradually for taxpayers whose 
adjusted gross income exceeded $60,000 for single filers, 
$100,000 for married persons filing jointly, $50,000 for 
married persons filing separately and $80,000 for heads of 
households. The personal exemption would be eliminated 
entirely for filers whose adjusted gross incomes exceed these 
amounts by more than $50,000 ($25,000 for married persons 
filing separately) . These amounts would be increased annually, 
starting in 1996, to account for changes in the cost of living. 

Allow interest and dividends from deposits in all banks and 
institutions to gualify for the $100 deduction ($200 for 
married couples) currently applicable only to Massachusetts 
bank interest and dividends. 

Allow the $1000 net capital loss deduction to be taken against 
all income, not just against Part A income as current law 
provides . 



52 



(3) PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX AND WATER RATE CREDIT WOULD; 

Create a property tax and water rate credit of up to $200 for 
eligible homeowners and renters who have total incomes less 
than: $30,000 for married couples, $25,000 for head of 
household filers and $20,000 for single filers. The amount of 
the credit would depend on the amount by which the taxpayers* 
real estate property tax and water charges exceeded 10% of 
their income. 20% of tenants' rent would be treated as a 
property tax payment for these purposes. If the taxpayer had 
no income tax due, the amount of any credit due would be paid 
to the taxpayer, as long as the state Legislature made any 
appropriation necessary to pay such refunds. 

(4). PROPOSED $2000 INCREASE IN THE EXISTING INCOME THRESHOLDS 
FOR NO-TAX STATUS WOULD: 

Exempt taxpayers at or below the following levels of adjusted 
gross income from paying income tax: $14,000 for married 
couples filing jointly, $12,000 for head of household filers, 
and $10,000 for single filers. These levels would be adjusted 
annually, starting in 1996, to account for changes in the cost 
of living. The new levels also would apply to the limited 
income credit which is available to taxpayers with adjusted 
gross income up to 175 percent of these levels. 

(5) PROPOSED CAPITAL FORMATION INCENTIVE WOULD: 

Replace the current 50% capital gains deduction with a "capital 
formation incentive" deduction, which would allow partial 
deductions for gains from the sale or exchange of qualified 
stock issued by certain corporations that employ 50% or more of 
their employees in Massachusetts. 

Only gains on original stock purchased on or after January 1, 
1995 from certain corporations engaged in active business, and 
held for required periods of time, would qualify for the 
deduction. The amount of the deduction would be 30% of the 
gain on stock held at least 3 years; 50% for stock held at 
least five years; and 70% for stock held at least seven years. 
Detailed provisions would restrict the benefit of this 
deduction to stock issuances which reflect new investments in 
businesses, and would disqualify stock in certain types of 
corporations that receive special tax treatment under existing 
law. 

(6) PROPOSED CAP ON TAX LIABILITY FOR CERTAIN TAXPAYERS IN 1995 
WOULD : 

Excuse taxpayers at or below the following levels of adjusted 
gross income, as determined under the proposed law, from owing 
more Massachusetts income tax in 1995 than they would have owed 
under 1992 law: $100,000 for married couples filing jointly, 



53 



$80,000 for heads of household, $60,000 for single filers, and 
$50,000 for married persons filing separately. 

(7) EFFECTIVE PATE; 

If the State Constitution is amended at the 1994 election to 
reguire graduated income tax rates, the proposed law would be 
effective beginning in tax year 1995. The proposed law states 
that if any of its provisions were found invalid, the other 
provisions would remain in effect. 

Note; Wherever this summary refers to current or existing law, 
the reference is to the law in effect in August, 1993, when 
this summary was prepared* 

Yes 657 

No 1924 

Blanks 172 

2753 

Question 8 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 
4, 1994? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would increase the portion of gasoline tax 
revenue that would be credited to the state Highway Fund; 
prohibit the transfer of money from the Highway Fund to other 
state funds for other purposes; declare that citizens have a 
right to a safe and efficient public highway, road and bridge 
system and reguire the state to develop a comprehensive 
seven-year state transportaton plan; and make certain other 
changes in state finance laws relating to the Highway Fund. 

The proposed law would reguire that the small portion of state 
gasoline tax revenues that is deposited in funds relating to 
the use of watercraft be deposited instead in the Highway 
Fund. No revenue deposited in the Highway Fund could be 
transferred to any other state fund for any purpose other than 
one for which the Highway Fund may be used. 

The proposed law would declare that the citizens of 
Massachusetts have a right to a safe and efficient public 
highway, road and bridge system, constructed and maintained by 
the state and its counties, cities and towns. The State 
Secretary of Transportation and Construction would be reguired 
to prepare a comprehensive state transportation plan for the 
period July 1, 1995 through June 30, 2002, to be updated every 
three years. The plan would provide for the repair or 
reconstruction of at least five percent of public highways and 



54 



bridges every year, and it would establish priorities for 
highway, road and bridge projects based on condition and safety 
factors. The plan would be designed to promote economic 
development and employment by meeting the various transportaion 
needs of residents throughout the state. The plan would be 
prepared after a public hearing and after consultation with the 
state Secretaries of Environmental Affairs and Economic Affairs. 

Under the proposed law, money in the Highway Fund would no 
longer be considered in determining whether the state 
government has sufficient money on hand to set some aside for 
use in future fiscal years or to deposit some in the state tax 
reduction fund. The proposed law would declare that no more 
than 15% of gasoline tax revenues could be used for mass 
transportation purposes, but it would not prevent the state 
Legislature from appropriating additional gasoline tax revenues 
for such purposes. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were 
declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 

Yes ' 1780 

No 717 

Blanks 256 

2753 

Question 9 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was 
taken by the Senate or the House of Representataves before May 
4, 1994? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would prohibit rent control for most 
privately owned housing units in Massachusetts, and would 
nullify certain existing rent control laws, except that cities 
and towns would be authorized to adopt a restricted form of 
rent control for a six month period, after which compliance by 
property owners would be voluntary. 

The proposed law would prohibit any city or town from enacting, 
maintaining or enforcing any law that requires below-market 
rents for residential properties. It would also prohibit the 
regulation of occupancy, services, evictions, condominium 
conversion, or the removal of the unit from rent control, if 
such regulation was part of a system requiring below-market 
rents. Existing state and local rent control laws would be 
nullified. The proposed law would not affect publicly owned or 
subsidized housing, federally assisted housing, or mobile homes. 

Cities and towns would be authorized to adopt rent control for 
a six-month period on housing units that have a fair market 



55 



rent of $400 or less and that are owned by a person or entity 
owning ten or more rental units. Such rent control could not 
include the regulation of occupancy, services, evictions, 
condominium conversion, or the removal of the unit from rent 
control. The city or town would have to pay the owners of 
rent-controlled units the difference between the controlled 
rent and the fair market rent. After six months, owners of 
rent-controlled units would not be required to comply with the 
rent control regulation or with any other such regulation that 
the city or town might adopt in the future. 

The proposed law would take effect on January 1, 1995. The 
proposed law states that if any of this provision were declared 
invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 

Yes 1488 

No 1077 

Blanks 188 

2753 

Question 10 THIS QUESTION IS NOT BINDING 

Shall the state representative from this district be instructed 
to vote for an amendment to the Massachusetts Constitution that 
would allow the people of Massachusetts to vote to exercise 
their right of self-government not only through the United 
States Congress, but also, in international affairs, through a 
constitutional and representative United Nations Global 
Federation framed with an enforceable Bill of Rights? 

Yes 745 

No 859 

Blanks 1149 

2753 



56 



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58 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1994 

75,000 Conservation Land Loan, 7.60% due November 15, 1994, 

issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G.L. 
1,420,000 General Obligation Bonds, 5.7696%, due $400,000 each 

March 15, 1995-1996, and due $370,000 March 15, 1997 and 

due $250,000 March 15, 1998, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) 

and (3A) and 7(25), and Ch. 359 of the Acts of 1979, S. 3 

of the G.L. 
2,190,000 General Obligation Bonds, 6.3481%, due $365,000 each 

November 15, 1994-99, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3), 

S. 8(22), and S. 8(24) of the G.L. 



3,685,000 TOTAL MUNICIPAL LOANS 



3,685,000 NET DEBT 



80,000 Water Loan, 7.80%, due $80,000 December 1, 1994, 
80,000 TOTAL WATER BONDS 



3,765,000 TOTAL DEBT (BONDED) 



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64 



TOWN OF LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES OF GENERAL FUND 
BUDGET AND ACTUAL - BUDGETARY BASIS 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 



REVENUES: 
Property taxes 
Motor vehicle excise taxes 
Departmental 
Licenses and permits 
Intergovernmental 
Interest 
Fines 
Donations 
Miscellaneous 
Total revenues 

EXPENDITURES : 
General government 
Public safety 
Health and sanitation 
Public works 
Education and library- 
Recreation 
Cemetery 

Veterans' services 
Debt service 
Special articles 
Insurance and employee 

benefits 
Intergovernmental assessments 

Total expenditures 
Ixcess (deficiency) of revenues 
over expenditures 

YTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) : 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 
Available surplus 
Total other financing 
sources (uses) 

xcess (deficiency) of revenues 
and other financing sources 
over expenditures and other 
uses 



$ 9, 



Budget 

843,520 
303,666 
176,000 

70,000 

1,170,468 

100,000 

40,000 

310,000 

245.000 

12,258,654 



1,776,479 

223,075 

13.363.348 



(1,104,694) 



202,484 

17,800) 
920.010 

1.104.694 





Favorable 


Actual 


(Unfavorable) 


9,843,520 


$ 




442,200 




138,534 


244,820 




68,820 


95,246 




25,246 


1,257,560 




87,092 


146,318 




46,318 


55,105 




15,105 


310,000 






257.214 




12.214 



12.651.983 



1,521,422 

222.775 

12,909,566 



257.583 ) 



217,597 
17,800) 
57.786 



257.583 



393.329 



1 


034,703 




977,705 


56,998 


1 


501,349 


1 


,484,243 


17,106 




141,998 




128,959 


13,039 




931,760 




914,740 


17,020 


5 


692,120 


5 


,687,683 


4,437 




192,468 




180,261 


12,207 




15,900 




14,181 


1,719 




6,096 




6,096 




1 


310,458 


1 


,290,252 


20,206 




536,942 




481,249 


55,693 



255,057 

300 

453,782 



847.111 

15,113 
( 862.224 ) 

( 847.111 ) 



65 



TOWN OF LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN RETAINED EARNINGS/ 

FUND BALANCES - PROPRIETARY FUND TYPE AND SIMILAR TRUST FUNDS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 



Operating revenues: 
Charges for services 
Gifts and bequests 



Operating expenses: 
General government 
Recreation 
Operating 
Salaries 
Depreciation 



Operating income (loss) 



PROPRIETARY 


FIDUCIARY 




FUND TYPE 


FWD 


TYPE 


Combined 
Totals 


Enterprise 


Nonexpendable 


(Memorandum 


Fund 


Trust 
$ 


Funds 
63,216 


Onlv) 


$ 882,000 


$ 945,216 






15,286 
78.502 


15.286 


882.000 


960,502 






92,315 


92,315 






1,412 


1,412 


128,204 






128,204 


130,082 






130,082 


63.154 






63. 154 


321.440 




93,727 


415. 167 


560,560 


( 


15,225) 


545, 335 



Non- operating revenues 
(expenses) : 
Investment income 
Interest expense 
Total non- operating 
revenues (expenses) 

Other financing sources (uses) : 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 
Total other financing sources 
(uses) 



( 9.360 ) 
( 9.360 ) 



17,800 
60.000 ) 



45,135 



45.135 



_650) 



45,135 

( 9.360 ) 

35.775 



42,200 ) 



650 ) 



17 
( 60 


800 
650) 


( 42 


850) 



Net income 

Retained earnings/fund 
balances, beginning of year 

Retained earnings/fund 
balances, end of year 



509,000 



2,001,143 



5 2-510.143 



29,260 



601.400 



538,260 



2,602,543 



66 



TOWN OF LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS 

PROPRIETARY FUND TYPE AND SIMILAR TRUST FUNDS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 



CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING 
ACTIVITIES : 

Operating income (loss) 
Adjustment to reconcile 
operating income (loss) to 
net cash provided by (used in) 
operating activities: 
Depreciation 

Changes in assets and 
liabilities: 
Increase in: 

Accrued interest receivable 
User charges receivables 
Accounts payable 
Net cash provided by (used in) 
operating activities 



PROPRIETARY 
FUND TYPE 



Enterprise 
Fund 



$ 560,560 



63,154 



83,172) 
12,929 



553,471 



CASH FLOWS FROM CAPITAL AND 
RELATED FINANCING ACTIVITIES: 

Operating transfer in 17,800 

Operating transfers out ( 60,000) 

Interest paid on bonds ( 9,360) 

Acquisition of capital assets ( 151,120) 

Principal paid on bonds payable ( 80,000 ) 

Net cash used in capital and 

related financing- activities ( 282.680 ) 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING 

ACTIVITIES : 

Investment income 

Purchases of securities 

Proceeds from disposition 

of securities 

Net cash provided by (used in) 

investing activities 

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH 270,791 

CASH, beginning of year 738.441 

CASH, end of year $ 1.009.232 



FIDUCIARY 
FUND TYPE 



Nonexpendable 
Trust Funds 



($ 15,225) 



( 8,437) 



( 23.662 ) 



( 650) 



.650) 



45,135 
( 73,520) 

197,281 



78.896 



54,584 



150,218 



S 204.802 



Combined 
Totals 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



545,335 



63,154 



8,437) 
83,172) 
12.929 



529.809 



17,800 

60,650) 

9,360) 

151,120) 

80.000 ) 



283.330 ) 



45,135 
( 73,520) 



107,281 



78,896 



325,375 
888.659 



$ 1.214.034 



67 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



L. Bruce Long 

William M. Stason 

Paul E. Marsh, Chairman 



To find the official valuations assigned to your property, you 
must refer to the list printed in last year's Town Report. Since we 
have not yet been recertified by the Commonwealth's Department of 
Revenue, Lincoln's only property valuations with any official 
standing are those from last year. 



The reason for this delay is not far to seek: We have not com- 
pleted converting the manual one-person assessing system the Town has 
had since before the memory of living man to the computer-based mass 
assessing system we have recently installed. The former depended on 
the smallest amount of data needed to justify an assigned value for 
each property; the latter, on the most detail the viewer can record 
— the computer can digest it all. Refining and enhancing our data 
base has taken much longer than anyone anticipated. In addition, 
many of Lincoln's houses are wonderfully individual and eccentric -- 
tedious for computers to assimilate. 



Beyond this inherent difficulty, a couple of extraneous events 
have slowed down conversion: 

1. The Town shifted to the E911 emergency response system and 
Ms. Noyes, for the Assessing Department, was centrally and heavily 
involved in insuring that every last telephone in Lincoln was 
properly located on a Town map and had a proper Town address. This 
took weeks — months — of time. 

2. In December, Ms. Noyes was stolen from us by another town, 
with a shorter commute by 50%, for higher pay and a four-day work 
week. Lincoln could not compete and we could not, in good con- 
science, urge her to stay with us. 



Ms. Noyes, in not quite a year and a half, has launched a 
revolution from which there is no turning back. She has served 
Lincoln wonderfully well and we -- all of us -- are grateful. We 
wish her well. 



68 



Some points of interest that may be important to you ! ! 

1) The Assessors' office is open Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. unless otherwise posted, to assist the public regarding 
real and personal property and motor vehicle assessments, tax 
abatements, tax exemptions, and any other tax questions you may 
have. 

2) Assessment date for taxes is January 1 of each year. 

3) Real & Personal property abatement applications must be filed 
within 30 days of the date the actual bill is issued. Applica- 
tion forms may be picked up at the Assessors' office. 

4) Motor vehicle and trailer excise abatement applications must be 
filed by December 31 of the year succeeding the year involved. 
Application forms may be picked up at the Assessors' office. 

5) Exemptions are available for those who meet certain qualification 
requirements. Examples are: Homeowners who are legally blind, 
veterans with at least 10% disability, surviving spouses, elderly 
over 70, and a tax deferral for elderly over 65. Application 
forms and additional information may be obtained from the 
Assessors' office. 

6) Anyone receiving a building permit during the year can expect a 
visit from the Assessors near the end of that year or the begin- 
ning of the next. If the owner is not home at that time, the 
Assessors will leave a notice and the property owner will be 
expected to call to make a convenient appointment as soon as 
possible. 

Thank you for your continuing assistance and cooperation. If 
there is anything we can do for you, don't hesitate to call our 
office (259-8850). 



69 



Board of Assessors 

Recap of 

Fiscal Year 1994 



Valuation 

Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Total 



$732,669,280 

11,049,516 

743,718,796 



Appropriations and Assessments 
Town Appropriations 
State and County Appropriations 
Overlay 
Total 



$14,524,000.99 
223,075.00 
100,000.00 



$14,847,075.99 



Estimated Receipts 

Cherry Sheet Receipts 

Over Estimates Cherry Sheet 

Local Estimated Receipts 

Free Cash 

Available Funds 

Total 

Net Amount to Raise 



$1,322,499.00 

270.00 

1,505,458.69 

1,000,000.00 

1,075,328.00 



$4,903,555.69 
$9,943,520.30 



Taxes for County, State & Town 
Real Property 
Personal Property 

Tax Rate 

Number of Parcels 
Real Estate 
Personal Property 

Value of Real Estate 

Land Exclusive of Buildings 
Buildings Exclusive of Land 

Exempt Property 

Number of Parcels 
Building Value 
Land Value 
Total Value 



$9,795,788.27 
147,732.03 

$13.37 per $1000 



2091 
23 



$285,557,400 
447,111,880 



432 

$42,237,612 

80,082,796 

122,320,408 



70 



TAX EQUITY STUDY COMMITTEE 

Robert Lincoln 
Kemon Taschioglou 
Emanuel Maier, Chairman 

Pursuant to the vote taken under Article 26 at the 1992 Annual 
Meeting, David M. Donaldson, Moderator, appointed a committee to 
study the feasibility of modifying the base on which Lincoln assesses 
property tax from one that depends entirely on the value of the 
property to one that takes into consideration, to some greater or 
lesser extent, the income of the owner of the property. The 
Committee was asked to pay particular attention to the needs of 
citizens who were severely burdened by their current property taxes. 
A portion of David Donaldson's charge to the Committee, which shows 
his understanding and humanity, follows: 

"The subject that your Committee is being asked to look into 
stems from a deeply-felt concern on the part of some of our 
citizens that the current real estate tax system unfairly 
disadvantages those citizens who, living on fixed incomes, 
believe that, despite the significant increase in the value of 
their property, they cannot afford to absorb the increased real 
estate that result from the increase in value and the increased 
costs of providing town services. While the proponents of the 
motion under Article 26 have suggested some sort of relief 
based on the income of the owner (which should be the principal 
focus of your study) if, in the course of looking at an "income 
tax" as a relief device, the Committee discovers an alternative 
solution to the basic problem, I am sure that all concerned 
would be glad to consider it. In other words, while it is 
important to focus on the specific question, the Committee 
should not feel constrained by the suggested solution. 

I am reasonably certain that you will quickly find that any 
change to the current system of real-property taxation will 
require an act of the legislature. One might, therefore, 
quickly dispose of the study by concluding that any change is 
"illegal". While I do not want to tell the Committee how to do 
its job, I would suggest that the proponents of the Article 
might find such a limited response disheartening, and you 
might, therefore, consider taking a look at all of the options 
unconstrained by the existing legislative framework, for it is 
always possible (although not very easy) to change the law." 

The Tax Equity Committee reported on its progress in the 1993 
and 1994 Town Meetings and in last year's Town Report. A year ago we 
had not yet received and analyzed the responses to the town-wide 
survey we had conducted. Here we present a brief summary of the 
results of the survey. 



71 



We were extremely pleased at the response rate of our survey. 
We received 350 responses, approximately 20% of the town. Through 
comparison with census data and the town assessors' list we concluded 
that our sample was broadly representative with respect to incomes 
and property taxes. 

The survey results were somewhat equivocal. There was a very 
high degree of disagreement in the town as to the desirability of 
change and the attractiveness of the specific options we had 
suggested as methods to achieve change. 

The options, "Exemption, " which provides relief to those unable 
to pay taxes because of age, infirmity and poverty, and "Deferral," 
which defers but does not reduce taxes, scored considerably higher 
than all other options. The lowest rated option was the "Private 
Funding" alternative. The remaining options of "Assisted Deferral," 
"Flexible Zoning," "Homestead Exemption," "Circuit Breaker," and "No 
Change" all achieved midrange scores. However, the "Circuit 
Breaker," which limits property taxes to a maximum percent of income, 
and "No Change" options tended to be polarizing and achieved their 
average rankings by scoring very high with some residents and very 
low with others. 

Roughly a third of respondents indicated a need for tax 
relief. The characteristics of this group were somewhat different 
than the average, in that while its property tax payments were about 
average for the Town, its income level was lower and its outstanding 
mortgage was considerably higher than average. The options favored 
by this group were the "Exemption," the "Circuit Breaker," and the 
"Homestead Exemption." 

The subgroup who had not expressed a need for property tax 
relief favored the "Exemption," and the "Deferral" but was very much 
against the "Circuit Breaker." 

The high average outstanding mortgage level for the group 
needing property tax relief led us to break this group into two 
smaller groups. About a third of those needing tax relief had 
relatively high outstanding mortgages. The "high mortgage" group had 
higher income than the "low mortgage" group, had about the same 
property tax bill, and had an average outstanding mortgage nearly 7 
times the average mortgage of the "low mortgage" group. The options 
favored and disliked for these two subgroups were similar. It is 
clear, however, that those in the "high mortgage" group are burdened 
much more by their high mortgage payments than they are by their 
property tax bill. 

We received a large number of written comments on the 
questionnaires. The comments reflected a wide diversity of opinion, 
but there were a few clearly defined themes. We also found 
surprisingly intense feelings on the issues. Some citizens were 
fearful, others were angry. There was a mixture of idealism and 



72 



pragmatism. We report the themes of the comments here in the spirit 
of openness and community in the hopes that recognition and 
understanding will help us resolve our differences. 

The overall thrust of the comments was that there were 
significant problems regarding the property tax. Seventy percent of 
those commenting thought that property tax rates were too high. Most 
thought they could be lowered by reducing Town spending, but a 
significant number thought that Lincoln should look for other sources 
of income. Only a few of the respondents mentioned a specific focus 
on the elderly, and we found this surprising, since much of the 
questionnaire attempted to address problems thought to be important 
to older citizens. 

However, half of those who wrote comments thought that the Town 
should not change the present property tax structure. This theme was 
characterized by intense feelings. Some said that the current 
structure was equitable in that it served to balance taxes by its 
relation to property value as a proxy for wealth, or net worth, 
rather than having taxes relate only to income. Another reason not 
to change the current structure was a desire not to subsidize the 
high value homes of those with low incomes. Others thought that a 
more progressive property tax would drive the wealthy out of Lincoln 
and consequently bring down property values. A small group responded 
that people who couldn't afford to live in Lincoln should move out. 

About a third of respondents commented on significant major 
related concerns, such as: that property tax assessments were not 
generally equitable across properties, "I am scared about the 
future," "My situation is very difficult," "I get too few services 
for the taxes I pay." Another third offered other ideas, comments on 
the survey, and alternative tax proposals. 

We are not surprised that Lincoln citizens have responded to 
our questionnaire by raising many new issues and creative ideas. We 
do not feel we can offer any specific recommendations until our Town 
in its characteristic way has opportunities to respond to these 
issues and ideas. We hope that our report then will serve as a 
foundation for further analysis and discussion. 

Our comprehensive report will be on file at the Lincoln Public 
Library. 



73 



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75 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 

FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

D. James Arena, Chief 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activity of the Lincoln Police 
Department for the calendar year 1994: 

CRIMINAL ACTIVITY: 

Breaking and entering 16 

Larcenies 45 

Motor vehicle theft 1 

Assault 4 

Forgery 1 

Embezzlement 1 

Stolen property 6 

Vandalism 37 

Narcotic law violations 14 

Disorderly conduct 15 

Arrests 89 

Trespass 6 

Civil matters 12 

Juvenile matters 13 

Ordinance/bylaw violations 12 

Reports of missing persons 14 

Domestic matters 25 

Telephone disturbance calls 117 
Reports of suspicious activities 111 

General service responses 290 

Animal complaints 24 

Ambulance calls 244 

Unattended death report 4 

Alarms responded to 678 

Assists to other agencies 30 

Restraining order services 29 

Reports of confused persons 11 

Protective custody 27 

TRAFFIC ACTIVITIES: 

Operating under the influence 33 

Motor vehicle complaints 526 

Accidents investigated 199 

Traffic citations 815 

Overall there was a general decrease in criminal activity and we 
are pleased to note a rather substantial drop in the number of 
break-ins. 



76 



We continue to endeavor to have officers maintain a high 
visibility level with the intent of deterring crime and controlling 
traffic violators. Our officers regularly attend training classes on 
a variety of law enforcement subjects as offered by the Criminal 
Justice Training Council. 

Our DARE program continues its marked success with much credit 
going to DARE Officer Kevin Mooney. We were pleased to have received 
a monetary grant for the program from the State and as 1995 
approaches we learn that we are to receive an additional grant for 
the upcoming year. 

As 1994 winds down there will be a change at the helm of the Fire 
& Police Departments. I would like to take this opportunity to 
express my sincere appreciation to all who have made my service here 
worthwhile: fellow employees, town staffers and officials and, of 
course, the members of the community whose support for public safety 
has been constant. To my successor Allen Bowles I wish all the best 
and could only ask that he have the benefit of the support of all who 
I have mentioned. 



77 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Fire 
Department for the calendar year 1994: 

Accidents responded to 112 

Ambulance runs 244 

Ambulance transports 137 

Brush fires 13 

Building fires 8 

False alarms 329 

Investigations 49 

Lock-outs (vehicle & property) 134 

Vehicle Fires 17 

Mutual aid responses 64 

Reports of outside burning 7 

Special service 470 

Water problems 11 

Wires down/arcing 27 

During the year the Department also conducted numerous 
inspections related to fire protection and prevention. We have 
endeavored to keep both members of the full-time and call departments 
updated on changes in firefighting procedures with both in-house 
training sessions and those administered by the State Fire Academy. 

1994 found us with the responsibility of ensuring that the rules 
promulgated by the Town's underground storage tank by-law were 
complied with. We would report with satisfaction that the community 
has been very cooperative in this regard with the end of 1994 showing 
that but a very small number of the required removals remain; we 
commend the residents for their cooperation. I would also commend 
Captain Richard Goddard for his work through the year in regard to 
the many issues surrounding the enforcement of this by-law. 

As 1995 approaches and Allen Bowles takes over as Chief we wish 
him well and ask the community to extend to him the cooperation and 
support they have shown me over the past eighteen years. 



78 



PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING DESIGN COMMITTEE 

Chief D. James Arena 

Timothy S. Higgins 

Neil Middleton 

Earl D. Midgley 

David Whalen 

Joseph Robbat, Jr. Chairman 

The Public Safety Building Design Committee (the Committee) was 
appointed by the Selectmen in June of 1993. The charge to the 
Committee is to plan the renovation of the public safety building 
located at the intersection of Codman and Lincoln Roads. 

Since last Town Meeting the Committee has met extensively with 
its architect/consultant, Allen Lieb/ to approve a program of 
operating requirements that the building must be able to meet. The 
plan approved by the Committee contemplates an addition behind the 
existing building to house the fire apparatus. The existing building 
will be renovated in order to eliminate code violations and create an 
up-to-date station which meets Lincoln's public safety needs for at 
least the next 20 years. 

Since the plan was approved by the Committee in November they 
have been meeting with other Town Boards to inform them on what has 
been accomplished to date, answer questions/ and hear suggestions on 
how to improve on the design. 

The Committee is working closely with the Selectmen and Finance 
Committee to assure the required coordination. The Committee will 
continue to meet with Town Boards to answer questions about the 
project as it develops. The Committee is also looking forward to 
holding a series of meetings with the public to outline the process 
to date and their plans for completion of the project. 



79 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Earl D. Midgley, Building Inspector 
Kenneth Desmond, Electrical Inspector 
Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 
Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 

This year saw much activity in Town. The Water Department's 
new Disinfection Facility is being constructed on Sandy Pond Road, 
around the corner from the Pumping House. DeCordova Museum is 
expanding its administration and school facilities and plans an 
addition to the museum itself. The school complex is undergoing 
extensive renovations with major additions behind Smith School and 
between Brooks and Smith Schools. 

New residential building starts, remodeling and additions have 
stayed much the same as last year with the values of the work 
totaling about eight million dollars. 

Below are the statistics for 1994. 



Values as submitted by applicants — 

Building $8,348,930.00 

Battle Road Farm 1,247,000.00 

DeCordova Expansion 550,000.00 

School Complex Expansion 9,188,347.00 

Water Disinfection Facility 1,394,000.00 

Plumbing (Residential) 356,050.00 

Electrical (Residential) 287,739.00 



Building permits issued — 

New Residential 19 

Battle Road Farm 17 

Additions and Remodeling 84 

Garages, Sheds, Barns 19 

Swimming Pools 3 

Greenhouses 3 

Re-roofing 20 

Tents (temporary) 33 

Signs 1 

Woodburning Stoves 30 

Fences 6 

Tennis Courts 1 

Accessory Apartments 1 

Total 237 

Plumbing permits issued 148 

Electrical permits issued 167 



80 



1994 totals 



Permit fees collected — 

(Residential) 

Building $ 49,288.00 

Plumbing 8,918.00 

Electrical 17,286.00 

Woodburning Stoves 750.00 

Recertif ications 160.00 

Total $ 76,402.00 



81 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Earl D. Midgley 

Please note the following regarding FIREWOOD deliveries: State 
Law reguires, under the provisions of Sec. 299 of M.G.L. Chapter 94, 
that a delivery certificate be issued by the seller at the time of 
delivery. Said delivery and the price of the guantity of wood 
delivered in terms of cubic feet and the date of delivery must be 
included on the sales slip. The words CORD, TRUCKLOAD, FACE CORD, 
PILE or terms of similar import are expressly prohibited by Statute, 
Section 298 of M.G.L. Chapter 94, from being used either in 
advertisements or delivery certificates or sales invoices. Quantity 
(in cubic feet) is measured when the wood is closely stacked. 

The General Laws of Massachusetts reguire that all devices used 
for weighing or measuring commodities be accurately checked and 
certified by "SEALS" at least once each year. 

For the period commencing January 1, 1994, and ending December 
31, 1994, inclusive, in compliance with Section 37, Chapter 98, 
General Laws as amended, the following number of devices have been 
certified: 

Scales sealed 10 

Gasoline pumps sealed 3_9 

Total 49 

Sealing fees collected $723.20 

Scales and gasoline pumps not sealed reguire repairs or 
adjustments. 

Any guestions regarding weights and measures should be 
submitted to the Sealer of Weights and Measures at the Town Offices 
Building. 



82 



HEALTH & WELFARE 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Dr. Perry Culver, Vice-Chairman 
Diane Haessler, R.N., Secretary 
Dr. Craig Donaldson, Chairman 

Agents for the Board: 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 
Frank C. Emmons, Engineer 
John J. Devine, Sanitarian 
Jane Barnet, Animal Inspector 



The Board of Health meets the first Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. 
and more often as needed, with all meetings open to the public. 
Citizens wishing to be placed on the, agenda should contact Jane 
Barnet at Town Offices by the Thursday prior to the meeting if 
possible. 



Reports of Board Activities : 

1. Enforcement of Title V of the State Environmental Code: 

The State mandates examinations of sites for sewage and septage 
disposal, issuance of permits, holding hearings, and granting of 
variances. Summary of activities is as follows: (1994) 

Site investigations witnessed (i.e., percolation 

tests and test pits) 64 

Septic systems plans reviewed and approved 63 

Systems investigated for accessory apartments 2 

Installers permits issued 24 

Septage handlers licenses issued 5 

Fees collected by the Board in 1994 were as follows: 

Soil Test Witnessing $ 9,625 

Plan Review 4,800 

Disposal Installer Licenses 1,200 

Septage Handler Licenses 205 

Food Service Permits 200 

Total $16,030 



83 



2. Sanitarian Inspections: 

Sanitarian John Devine helped the Board enforce local health 
regulations according to Chapter X of the State Sanitary Code. 
Regular inspections of food service establishments in Lincoln were 
performed during the year, including restaurants and food service 
facilities in stores, schools, institutions, farm stands, as well as 
several facilities at Hanscom Field. The Codman Pool and Bathhouse 
were also inspected periodically by the Sanitarian as were the three 
day camps and Farrington Memorial. Any complaints of possible food 
contamination are also investigated by the Sanitarian. 

3. School Health Program: 

The School/Town nurse and the two health aides continued to 
play an important role in supporting and protecting optimal health at 
the public school campus. Dr Lynn Weigel served ably as school 
physician and Cindy Anthony has continued her active involvement in 
health teaching. 

The school health personnel are as follows: 

Cynthia Anthony, R.N., School/Town Nurse 
Anne Marie Mahoney, School Health Aide 
Laurel DiMatteo, School Health Aide 
Lynn Weigel, M.D., School Physician 

4. Flu Clinic: 

Again this year, members of the Board of Health and the 
School/Town Nurse conducted a Flu Clinic, held in late October and 
sponsored by the Council on Aging. This year flu shots were provided 
to 200 individuals. The Town Nurse also provided flu shots to some 
of Lincoln's homebound elderly. A one dollar voluntary contribution 
was requested of those receiving shots. 

5. Summary of Eliot Community Mental Health Center Activities: 

This facility provides services to Lincoln residents and 
includes an outpatient clinic, geriatric, mental retardation, and 
therapeutic preschool programs. In 1994 there were 293 direct 
service contacts for Lincoln residents. Nine towns participate in 
funding these services and Lincoln's contribution to the Mental 
Health Center in 1994 was $3,750. 

6. Report of the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project: 

The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project conducts a program 
in Lincoln consisting of mosquito and wetland surveillance, water 
management and public education. Lincoln's cost for the Project in 
1994 was $7,700. 



84 



The goal of the surveillance program is to target mosquito 
breeding areas and to monitor changes in the adult mosquito 
population with particular regard to possible emergence of equine 
encephalitis. Three sites in Lincoln are monitored and held to 
determine the need for control. There was no program of aerial 
spraying of Bti this year. 

7. Summary of Animal Inspector's Activities: 

One of the Animal Inspector's responsibilities is to supply the 
Massachusetts Department of Food and Agriculture, Bureau of Animal 
Health and Dairying, with a list of animal owners, the number of 
livestock, and general health of animals in the Town. 

A compilation of the 1994 animal census is as follows: 



Number of Dairy Herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 



Number of Beef Herds ( " 

Number of Swine Herds ( " 

Number of Horses 

Number of Ponies 

Number of Donkeys 

Number of Mules 

Number of Sheep 

Number of Goats 

Number of Llamas 

Number of Poultry (flocks of more than 25) 



") 
") 



14 

43 

39 

85 

11 

2 

1 

103 

12 

7 

295 



Any dog known to have bitten a person must, by law, be 
quarantined for a period of 10 days in order to observe the animal 
for signs of rabies, and findings thereof are sent to the State 
Bureau of Animal Health and Dairying where they are kept on file for 
7 years. 

Out-of-state cattle entering Massachusetts must have their ear 
tag numbers recorded by the Inspector and the numbers forwarded to 
the State. If complaints arise with regard to the health or care of 
any livestock, the Animal Inspector investigates the circumstances in 
accordance with laws and regulations relating to animal health. 

Rabies was proven to be present in the Town during the year, 
although less prevalent than last year. Five suspected animals were 
taken to the State Lab in Jamaica Plain for testing and all tested 
negative for the disease. I would like to thank the Weston 
Veterinary Clinic for lab work and transportation services to Jamaica 
Plain. And a special thanks to Sally Hicks, D.V.M. for her endless 
help. The Town is most fortunate to have the valuable service of Jon 
Kelman, veterinary student at Tuft's, to prepare specimens for 
testing. There are several things homeowners can do to discourage 
wild animals from frequenting yards and approaching residences. 
Among these are: 



85 



DO NOT FEED WILD ANIMALS, do not feed pets outdoors, keep rubbish can 
lids securely fastened, and do not put garbage in plastic bags out in 
the open. If possible, cap chimneys with screens and seal openings 
in attics, basements, porches, etc. Bird food dropped from feeders 
also attracts raccoons. 

DO NOT APPROACH ANY STRAY OR WILD ANIMAL. Common sense and 
precautions must prevail. In addition to raccoons, bats, red and 
grey fox, skunks, and especially groundhogs (woodchucks) are 
susceptible to rabies. Birds and amphibians never, and squirrels 
rarely are susceptible. 

8. Recycling and Hazardous Waste: 

By State mandate, the Board is responsible for maintenance of 
proper sanitation at the Transfer Station and must monitor tonnage of 
materials shipped to NESWC and each category of materials being 
recycled. The Board strongly supports efforts to enhance recycling, 
and participated whenever possible in the townwide discussion 
regarding recycling and waste disposal. 



86 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Albert M. Avery III, Vice-Chairperson 

Selima K. Chandler 

Marian Cook 

Shirley D. Drew 

Marie R. Gavin 

Allan W. Greaves 

Barbara Grim 

Russell P. Mahan, Secretary/Treasurer 

Ruth Morey 

Marilyn O'Rourke 

Wendy L. Palu 

Barbara C. Cone, Chairperson 

Elaine Bloom, Director 

Liz King, Assistant to the Director 

The Council on Aging enriches the lives of Lincoln residents 60 
years or older by providing ongoing activities and programs. 
Assistance is available, if requested, for problem solving or in 
finding services so that our senior citizens find it possible to 
enjoy more years of independent living in their own homes. In 
addition, the Council on Aging is a resource to all Lincoln residents 
who request assistance to help their parents or other elderly 
relatives. 

This has been a busy year for the Council on Aging. Weekly 
activities include bridge games and classes, Scrabble, bowling, 
spring and fall walks and Easy Moves exercises. Both Line Dancing, 
led by Dot Manzelli and the very popular Fit for Life, an innovative 
senior weight lifting program, are meeting twice weekly. Monthly 
trips, planned and run by volunteers, included the theatre, ballet 
and flower show, the Fine Arts, Norman Rockwell, Kennedy and Science 
Museums and the Aquarium. There were also longer trips to view fall 
foliage in the Berkshires and spring blossoms at Lake Winnepesaukee. 
At our Thursday Coffee and Conversations, hosted by Jackie Parker, we 
traveled with Helen and Bruce Bare to "Temples and Canals of 
Thailand" and "The Great Colonial Cities of Mexico" and with Liz King 
to Alaska. We were educated by the League of Women Voters and 
Paul Marsh and learned how to be good clients. We enjoyed Math with 
Sam Rabinowitz and Pierce House at an old fashioned ice cream social 
and again in December when the First Parish Bell Ringers put us in 
the holiday mood. Activities are publicized in a Newsletter which is 
now mailed to all residents monthly. 

Thanks in part to a grant from the Lincoln Cultural Council, a local 
agency sponsored by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a series of 
exhibits featuring Lincoln artists is hanging at Bemis Hall. These 
same artists share their art at Coffee & Conversation. Bemis Hall 
previewed a colorful showing of covers from the "Lincoln Journal", 
coordinated by Betty Smith. Thanks to the generosity of the Codman 
Trust Fund and the Friends of the Council on Aging, Podiatry Clinics 



87 



have been increased to sixteen annually. Eleven blood pressure 
clinics are held and well attended. The annual Flu Immunization 
Clinic, coordinated with the Board of Health, was held in October in 
case of an early flu outbreak. Fuel assistance was available from 
the COA office. A grant from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs 
provided taxi transportation for seniors for local medical 
appointments, assistance with wellness programs and publication of 
the Newsletter. The COA helped Fire Chief Rick Goddard introduce 
EMCOA, a new program designed to assist the rescue squad in saving 
lives . 

Minuteman Home Care honored Wendy Palu at their Annual 
Meeting. She was named Volunteer of the Year for organizing 
Lincoln's popular Fit for Life program. Wendy is a member of the 
Lincoln COA Board as well as Vice President of the Minuteman Homecare 
Board of Directors. 

The following members of the Board of the Friends of the 
Council on Aging supported the Council in many ways: 

Catherine Bronson, Treasurer 

Barbara Davis 

Peg Elliott, President 

Ann Gannett 

Bill Grim 

Judy Gross 

Bill Monroe 

Claire Pearmain 

Elizabeth Snelling, Assistant to the President 

Jane Tatlock, Clerk 

Irving Telling 

Nancy Wood 

The Friends sponsored the gala holiday Top of the Town Party 
and Thanksgiving and Christmas Dinners. The dinners, given by 
Barbara Davis at her home, were very well attended. The Friends 
assisted in funding the Newsletter, Podiatry Clinics, trips and 
publications and hosted a "Thank You" luncheon for LINC and COA 
volunteers. The LINC, a volunteer driving program sponsored by the 
Friends of the Council on Aging, provided rides to Bemis Hall, the 
library, medical appointments, and for shopping and errands. 

Volunteers played a very important role in the activities of 
the COA. They served as Board members and Friends of the COA, Wheel- 
a-Meal and LINC drivers, collaters, speakers, hostesses, and 
teachers. SHINE (Serving Health Information Needs for the Elderly) 
Counselor Al Avery continued to meet, by appointment, with seniors 
requesting help with medical insurance questions and forms. Al Avery 
and Julie Pugh provided free tax preparation service. In all, 
volunteers gave more than 6,500 hours of their time, talents, energy 
and enthusiasm. We thank them. 



88 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE (MHC) 

Wendy L. Palu, Board Member 

Minuteman Home Care (MHC) is a non-profit social service agency 
which assists persons 60 years and older to live as independently as 
possible in their own homes and communities. The bulk of the 
Minuteman Home Care budget comes from State and Federal government 
funding sources. 

The State Home Care Program provides services such as case 
management/ homemaking, chores, transportation, respite care for 
caregivers and some administrative expenses. In addition, MHC 
provides protective services, eating together programs, information 
and referral, senior aides, alzheimer services, nursing home 
prescreening, companion care and money management programs. 

Title III-B and Title III-C of the Older Americans Act provides 
federal funding for congregate care meals and home-delivered meals 
programs, legal services, transportation services and innovative 
community projects. 

A portion of the MHC budget comes from sixteen member 
communities and private donations. These contributions are a 
critical part of the agency's support. Through payment of an annual 
"local share" Lincoln is entitled to be represented on the policy 
setting Board of Members of Minuteman Home Care which administers the 
services. The Board consists of twenty members and eight 
members-at-large. During the 1994 fiscal year, the local share 
assessed to the Town of Lincoln was $862.00. Local shares are 
assessed to each community on a formula based on the number of people 
60 years of age and older living in the community. In Fiscal Year 
1994 Lincoln received $59,013 in services from MHC. 

Lincoln's participation through the appointed Board member to 
Minuteman Home Care and its "local share" is vital to the continued 
success of Minuteman Home Care and provision of needed services to 
the elders in our region. 



89 



DOG OFFICER 

In March 1990, the Lincoln Board of Selectmen entered into a 
contract with Mr. Leslie Boardman to provide 24 hours/day, 365 
days/year dog officer services to the Town. The Dog Officer, or his 
agent, can be reached by calling the business phone at the Police 
Station. The dispatchers record all calls for the Dog Officer and 
the Dog Officer then picks up these messages each evening. 
Non-emergency callers can expect a return call within the next day. 
If the call is an emergency, the Dog Officer will be paged for an 
immediate response. 

After five years, Mr. Boardman is still the Dog Officer, and the 
program continues to run smoothly. It is clear that this would not 
be the case without the ongoing cooperation of the dispatchers and 
the Chief of Police. The Selectmen would also like to thank Mr. 
Boardman for his ongoing efforts. 

The Town of Lincoln held Rabies Clinics this year, on May 18, and 
September 24, 1994 for both dogs and cats. 

A reminder: Dog owners must now license their dogs by January 
1st of each year. Owners not licensing their dogs by April 1st will 
have a $5.00 fine added to the regular licensing fee. Licensing fees 
are as follows: 

Male/Female $10.00 
Spayed/Neutered 6.00 

Kennel License 25.00 (up to 4 dogs) 

Kennel License 50.00 (up to 10 dogs) 

Please remember, licenses make all the difference when trying to 
return a lost dog to its owner. 



90 



LINCOLN RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

John Bingham 
Wesley Frost 
Hugo Liepmann 
Roy Harvey, Chair 

Activities in 1994 

The Committee coordinated publicity about the Town's recycling 
programs through several media, including: 

* a flyer listing these programs and nearby places to take products 
for re-use (this flyer is available at the Town Offices and the 
Transfer Station) 

* stories in the Lincoln Journal 

* a flyer announcing the Hazardous Waste Collection Day 

* E-Call, the recycling hotline (dial RECYCLE, or 732-9253 for 
information) 

To help keep toxic materials out of NESWC waste streams, the 
Committee set up a button battery collection program at several 
locations in Town and by trash haulers serving the Town, and did 
initial research toward setting up a similar program for rechargeable 
batteries. 

The Committee recommended that wood no longer be taken to Wood 
Recycling, Inc., for financial and environmental reasons, and the 
Selectmen adopted the recommendation. 

The Committee worked with the Eastern Massachusetts Recycling 
Association and several nearby towns to share information on 
recycling programs. The Committee also reviewed the State's Solid 
Waste Master Plan 1994 Update and issued a memo on its impact on the 
Town, and monitored and communicated the new state waste bans. 

Status of Recycling in Lincoln: 

* Newspaper, mixed paper, glass (thanks again to the glass volunteers 
and to Lynn Donaldson for organizing them), cans, scrap metal, 
appliances, and button batteries are recycled at the Tranfer 
Station. Various goods that can be re-used are exchanged at the Swap 
Table. 

* The North East Solid Waste Consortium (NESWC) tipping fee increased 
to $88 per ton, and the Town is generating waste at a rate close to 
its Guaranteed Annual Tonnage (GAT). Hence, recycling is more 
financially attractive than ever. The Town received gross income of 
several thousand dollars by selling recyclables in 1994, and avoided 
several tens of thousands of dollars in NESWC tipping fees by 
recycling. 

* The Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day in October, organized 
by the Town and League of Women Voters, was successful, accommodating 
all comers and costing less than budgeted. The Committee hopes that 



i 



91 



hazardous waste collections will continue on a regular basis, perhaps 
bi-annually with paint collection days in the interim years. 

The Next Year: 

* State waste bans on plastic and heavy cardboard will take effect on 
January 1, 1996. The Committee will research how to handle and 
market these additional materials and advise the Town of its findings. 

* The Transfer Station needs to be upgraded to allow the collection 
of plastics and cardboard. Additional roll-off containers will 
probably be needed, and the Town is seeking state funds to help pay 
for them. Traffic flow at the Transfer Station could also be 
improved to reduce congestion at busy times. 

* The Committee will continue its task of publicity, monitoring of 
state programs and mandates, coordinating with nearby towns, and 
researching marketing of recyclables. 

* The Committee is operating below full staff level (6), and would 
welcome new members. 



92 



planning board PLANNING & PUBLIC WORKS 

E. Crawley Cooper 

M. Palmer Faran 

Thomas C. Wang 

James B. White 

Dilla G. Tingley, Chairman 

The year 1994 brought the Planning Board a grouping of seemingly 
unrelated issues. It will be remembered as the time in which trees, 
traffic and trails became the trajectory to traverse. 

Trees within the road right-of-way are protected by the Scenic 
Road Bylaw and the Public Shade Tree Act. The Lincoln Road trees had 
additional protection from townspeople expressing preference for 
trees over traffic, the latter viewed as fast and frequent. It was 
determined that the Board would recommend to the Selectmen that the 
trees should stay, a Tree Warden should be appointed, and a tree 
program put in place. Ken Bassett was selected as Tree Warden and 
will work with Mike Murphy, Conservation Land Manager, and Vinnie 
DeAmicis, Department of Public Works Director, to implement a program 
that reflects their many talents. 

The Lincoln Road reconstruction moved forward and traffic 
concerns were addressed by the Board. The two undertakings coincided 
and resulted in a summer of hard work, both on Lincoln Road and in 
the Town Office Building. Early fall found Lincoln Road with granite 
curbing and stone walls. The Planning Board, meanwhile, found that 
the 1984 Traffic Study, based on the direction of townspeople in that 
year that traffic should be kept off residential roads and routed to 
numbered ways, was a premise that no longer held. Townspeople now 
saw this objective as sacrificing one neighborhood for another. The 
list of Mitigation Measures was proving to be unworkable as a whole. 
The Planning Board thus joined with the Selectmen in writing a charge 
to a Traffic Committee and appointing seven residents from various 
parts of town to that Committee. This group will serve as an 
umbrella for the various traffic related groups of the Town and the 
region. 

Roadside paths moved from the category of "how do we fund them" 
to "with what do we surface them." Town Meeting appropriated funds 
to surface the Codman Road Path. This path was laid out by the 
Conservation Commission on Town owned Conservation land. The 
controversy over a surface of stone dust as opposed to asphalt 
demonstrated again that Lincoln residents are vocal and vociferous. 
We on the Planning Board acknowledge the grace with which the 
Conservation Commission accepted the decision of the Selectmen to 
pave the path. 

The Planning Board was involved in the filing of petitions with 
the County Commissioners to seek the discontinuance of Old County 
Road. The effort to sever the roadway permanently to prevent any 
possibility of through traffic has been a prime commitment of this 



93 



Board. Focus on that eastern portion of Lincoln has allowed the 
Board to be instrumental in improving the dangerous intersection of 
Winter Street and Old County Road and create one that is less 
hazardous due to the removal of outcroppings of ledge. Completing 
the immediate work in this area, the Board addressed the traffic 
impact analysis from Polaroid. The Board countered the claim by 
Polaroid that Lincoln roads would not be affected by increased 
traffic generated by a new corporate structure in the Winter Street 
area. 

In the area of zoning, the Planning Board sought and obtained 
Town Meeting approval to permit accessory apartments in R-l Cluster 
Developments . 

Although development in Lincoln was slow, the R-l Cluster 
Development of the 6.7 acre parcel owned by George and Julie Hibben 
was completed during the year. The Hibbens achieved a three lot 
cluster, one lot encompassing their dwelling at 75 Weston Road, and 
provided conservation restrictions on land totaling 57% of the area. 
The greensward along Weston Road is preserved, as is the expanse of 
open area abutting Beaver Pond. It is worth noting that the Hibbens 
did such a superb job of communicating with their entire neighborhood 
that there were no negative comments expressed by abutters as the 
process of land division was addressed by the Board. The willingness 
of the Hibbens to use cluster zoning illustrates their commitment to 
intelligent land planning and the values that have created open space 
in Lincoln as a continuum. 

Several land related items should be addressed less they be lost 
in time. 

The State Department of Public Works lots in North Lincoln have 
been sold and the town has benefited by increasing its housing 
stock by two single family, newly constructed, affordable 
dwellings. 

The Board was involved in lot reconfiguration of the open expanse 
of Adams family land. Approximately 15 acres was acquired by 
Walden Woods with permanent conservation restrictions to prevent 
Baker Farm from becoming a through way to Sandy Pond Road. 

Expansion at both the Carroll School on Baker Bridge Road and the 
DeCordova Museum on Sandy Pond Road continues to raise questions 
about the need for the Planning Board to amend the Zoning Bylaw 
to provide protection for our country roads from the ever 
increasing traffic volume due to increased educational and museum 
uses. 



94 



Following a full year of work, Enhanced 911 was activated on 
December 7, 1994. The Planning Board was involved in review of the 
names of each and every public and private way in Lincoln. For 
clarity, several names were changed, more were affirmed, a few were 
removed. A public hearing was held in July and, upon a unanimous 
vote of the Board, the proposed changes were adopted. Residents of 
Lincoln showed great cooperation with the renaming of ways and the 
renumbering of residences, resulting in a letter of commendation from 
New England Telephone. Liz Corcoran, Administrative Assistant to the 
Planning Board, coordinated and expedited this complex process and 
received a commendation from the Selectmen. 



95 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Despena F. Bi.ljJ.ings 

Peter Guldberg (appointed to full member Nov., 1994) 

Amalie Kass 

David P. Ries 

Andre M. Vagliano (term expired in 1994) 

Morton B. Braun, Chairman 

Buckner Creel, Associate Member 

Fred John Solman, III, Associate Member (term expired in 1994) 

During the past year there were two changes on the Board: the 
terms of Member Andre Vagliano and Associate Member F. John Solman 
expired and neither wished to be reappointed. Associate Member Peter 
Guldberg was appointed by the Selectmen to become a Member, and 
Buckner Creel was appointed to be an Associate Member. As 1994 
ended, the Board lacked its second Associate Member. We will miss 
Andre's vast knowledge of land use law and John's expertise in 
engineering. We thank them for their years of service. 

In last year's Annual Town Report we referred to two cases 
involving appeals from decisions of the Board. We are pleased to say 
that both have been resolved. One of them involved the special 
permit granted to Mr. Joseph Lufkin regarding a home occupation in 
the basement of his home at 127 Trapelo Road, which was contested by 
an abutter, Stratford Realty (Harold and Bruce Adler). Mr. Lufkin 
found that he required more space than his basement could provide and 
consequently he moved his business to offices in Concord. The Board 
thereupon revoked the special permit. The other case involved the 
Board's denial in June, 1990 of a special permit to Mr. Ronald 
Christensen for the business he conducts at 345 South Great Road. 
Mr. Christensen reapplied in 1994 and accordingly a public hearing 
was held. The Board decided to grant a special permit; however, it 
limits the number of vehicles allowed on the premises, and it is 
terminated on sale or devise of the business. 

A summary of the Board's decision during the past year follows: 

There were 13 applications filed, 13 hearings scheduled, 18 
renewals published during 1994 as follows. 

February 1 - W. BRUCE HUNTER, 10 LEWIS STREET special permit 

for consulting and import businesses. CONTINUED 

March 1 - CHRISTOPHER WHITE, 2 FORRESTER ROAD special 

permit for apartment. GRANTED 

BUCKNER CREEL, IV & KATHLEEN NICHOLS, 32 

LINCOLN ROAD special permit for addition on 
non-conforming lot. GRANTED 



96 



April 26 - JONATHAN MENKIS, 62 BEAVER POND ROAD special 

permit for addition on non-conforming lot. GRANTED 
MICHAEL BARNES, 26 OLD SUDBURY ROAD special 

permit for non-conforming structure. GRANTED 

June 14 - RONALD CHRISTENSEN, 345 SOUTH GREAT ROAD special 

permit for business. GRANTED 

July 19 ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH, 142 LINCOLN ROAD special 
permit to replace garage on non-conforming 
lot. GRANTED 



August 9 - JOHN L. GUMMERE, 15 LEWIS STREET special 
permit for tree service business. 



GRANTED 



September 13 FRAN'S LINCOLN AUTOMOTIVE, 170 SOUTH GREAT ROAD 
appeal Building Inspector decision and clarify 
previous special permit. UPHELD 

BRIAN BYRNE, 126 TRAPELO ROAD variance from 
side yard and width of lot through the 
building. CONTINUED 

October 4 - JOSEPH LUFKIN, 127 TRAPELO ROAD repeal special 

permit for business. GRANTED 

November 22- TATIANA DESSAIN, 62 CONANT ROAD special permit 

for apartment. DENIED 

WITHOUT 
PREJUDICE 



December 13- GILES DILG, 9 LEWIS STREET special permit for 
book publishing business. 



GRANTED 



RENEWALS : 



Conference use 



John A. Klobuchar, Conant Road - Radio tower 

Massachusetts Audubon Society, South Great Road 

Jacquelyn Snelling, 4 Farrar Road - Businesss 

Lawrence & Sarah Cannon Holden, 60 Weston Road - Apartment 

Patricia Horwitz, 68 Conant Road - Apartment 

Anil Kumar, 99 Conant Road - Apartment 

Keith & Janet Miller, 15 Baker Bridge Road - Apartment 

Anthony & Alice Pickman, 213 Concord Road - Apartment 

Charlton & Rosaly Walter, 58 Conant Road - Apartment 

Sejfi Protopapa, Lewis Street - Travel Agency 

Board of Selectmen, Lewis Street - Parking of school buses 

Joseph Azrack & Abigail Congdon, 19 Bedford Road - Apartment 

Angelo Basile, 9 Old Sudbury Road - Apartment 

Alan Donaldson, 279 South Great Road - Apartment 

Hamilton James, 78 Winter Street - Apartment 

Eugene Meyer, 31 Trapelo Road - Apartment 

Barry & Judith Solar, 152 Trapelo Road - Apartment 

Anne Young, 41 Bedford Road - Apartment 



97 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Peter Conrad 
Jona Donaldson 
John Goodrich 
Chris Klem 
Barbara Ream 
Chris White 
Tara Tracy, Chair 

In 1994, the Commission continued its stewardship and 
protection role of Lincoln's lands and natural resources. There were 
many successes during the year in terms of open space preservation, 
wildlife management and wetlands protection. In addition, the 
Commission continued its strategic planning effort whose goal is to 
establish a proactive approach to Lincoln's often-complicated natural 
resource-based and related issues. 

The Commission also participated in the review and development 
of several multi-board projects, in support of both its strategic 
planning effort and the recommendations of the Task Force on Town 
Governance . These projects included final siting decisions for the 
disinfection facility on Sandy Pond Road, the reconstruction of 
Lincoln Road, and the Codman Road roadside path. The Commission 
looks forward to the continuation and betterment of these types of 
efforts in the coming year. 

This year the Commission saw additional changes in membership. 
Unfortunately for the Commission, Ms. Barabara Ream resigned due to 
unexpected out-of-Town work commitments. Although Ms. Ream was a 
member for only a brief period, her enthusiasm, bright new ideas and 
strong commitment to the management of Lincoln's natural resources 
will be missed by the Commission. The Commission also lost the 
invaluable service of Mr. Christopher White who decided not to seek 
reappointment to the Board. Mr. White's strong technical skills, 
broad perspective, and keen insight into difficult conservation 
issues were great assets for the Commission. Early 1995 appointments 
to the Commission include Ms. Addie Kim, an environmental planner, 
and Tom Walker, an economist. 

PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

Staffing : The Commission continues to benefit from the hard 
work and dedication of its staff which includes Mike Murphy, 
Conservation Land Manager; Geoff McGean, Conservation Administrator; 
and Dan Reppucci, Chief Ranger. Their knowledge and expertise on 
natural resource issues are a valuable asset to the Commission and 
the Town. 

Open Space Activities : Despite the lack of public funds for 
land acquisition, the Commission completed a very successful year in 
meeting the goals of its current Open Space Plan. Working closely 
with other environmental organizations including the Lincoln Land 



98 



Conservation Trust, the Commission assisted with the purchase of two 
major parcels of land which will now be permanently conserved. 

The purchase of the former Van Leer Property off of Old Sudbury 
Road by the Massachusetts Audubon Society and a Wayland resident, Roy 
McDowell, ensures the protection of over 25 acres of prime 
agricultural farmland and nearly 70 acres of forested wetlands and 
uplands. All of the property, except for three potential building 
lots on the south side of Old Sudbury Road, is now under a permanent 
conservation restriction. In addition, trail easements through the 
property will link with existing trails providing a continuous 
recreational and wildlife corridor from Route 20 in Weston, through 
all of Lincoln, north to Route 2 in Concord. 

The Commission, in conjunction with the Lincoln Land 
Conservation Trust, continues to work with the Walden Woods Project 
on the preservation of the former Adams estate between Baker Farm 
Road and Sandy Pond Road. The mansion on the property will house the 
Thoreau Lyceum, an educational institute for Thoreauvian scholars. 
Upon securing of funding, the approximately 14-acres of open land 
associated with the estate will be permanently protected for the 
Town. This land contains a critical trail connection among the 
Flint's Pond conservation lands, Pine Hill, and the Walden Pond State 
Reservation, as well as providing watershed protection to the Town's 
water supply. Further ecological and historical value includes the 
unique Glacial Channel and spectacular Beech Spring referred to by 
Thoreau in his writings. 

Other activities during the year, in fulfillment of Lincoln's 
Open Space Plan, included the donation by Ms. Irma Kistiakowsky of a 
permanent conservation restriction on 12 acres of pristine forest 
adjacent to the Mt. Misery conservation parcel, and the donation by 
Mr. Jeffery Allsopp of 15 acres of forested wetlands off of Winter 
street for conservation purposes. The Commmission would like to 
thank Ms. Kistiakowsky and Mr. Allsopp for their generosity and their 
vision to help maintain Lincoln's conservation tradition. 

Wetlands : The Commission and the Conservation Administrator 
continue to respond to the numerous requests for information by 
residents and developers regarding construction and other activities 
in and near wetlands. Lincoln's numerous wetlands provide important 
benefits including pollution attenuation, flood control, protection 
of water supplies, storm damage prevention, and wildlife habitat. 
The Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Town's Wetlands 
Protection Bylaw provide the regulatory framework by which the 
Commission works to protect these important functions and values of 
the Town's wetlands. 

Through this framework, the Commission and its Administrator 
conduct site visits, guide residents through the permit process, 
review permit applications, and conduct meetings and hearings with 
applicants to ensure that a proposed project will not adversely 
affect wetlands. In many cases, the Commission requires that 



99 



specific conditions must be followed by an applicant for construction 
within 100 feet of wetlands. The Commission ensures that these 
conditions are satisfied during construction through regular site 
inspections. Over the past year, the Commission held 34 public 
meetings and hearings, and among the projects that came before the 
Commission over the last year were new house construction, house 
additions, pond maintenance activities, and several federal, state 
and municipal projects. 

In order to facilitate a more proactive approach to wetlands 
protection in the Town, the Commission is undertaking an educational 
outreach program. The Commission is working to develop information 
which teaches homeowners the importance and benefits of wetlands, and 
how residents and developers can become "good neighbors" to their 
wetlands . 

Farmland ; As part of its stewardship role, the Commission 
works to ensure that sound agricultural practices are followed on all 
Town-owned lands which are leased to farmers. The Commission 
encourages rotation of crops, careful pesticide and fertilizer use, 
and annual soil monitoring to help maintain land productivity. This 
past year saw the successful implementation of a farmland/wildlife 
policy which attempts to eliminate some of the conflicts that have 
arisen over the last several years. The policy, which was developed 
with the assistance of farmers, wildlife experts and many interested 
residents, attempts to balance the agricultural needs with the 
habitat needs of both endangered and nuisance wildlife species. In 
all cases, the Commission encourages farmers to consider agricultural 
practices that are least invasive to wildlife. 

Currently, there are six farmers leasing 180 acres of farmland 
from the Town. Revenues generated from the 5-year lease agreements 
total $4,191 per year. 

Wildlife : Over the past year, the Commission undertook a 
greater effort toward inventorying and protecting the numerous 
species of wildlife that are dependent on Lincoln's conservation 
lands. During the late winter and spring, over 30 eager volunteers 
assisted with an inventory of vernal pools in the Town. Through a 
lot of hard work and wet feet, over 40 pools were identified for 
potential certification and permanent protection at the local and 
state level. These temporary pools of water provide critical 
breeding habitat for certain species of salamanders and frogs. 

Cooperation by farmers led to the successful creation of 
nesting habitat for several species of grassland birds. The 
appearance of a nesting pair of Henslow's Sparrows in Farm Meadow was 
the first documented sighting in over 20 years in Massachusetts. 
Hundreds of birders from all over the northeast descended upon 
Lincoln to view this endangered species. Massachusetts Audubon 
Society, Codman Community Farm and Commission staff all worked 
cooperatively to ensure that the birds were not disturbed so that 
they could complete a successful breeding cycle. In accordance with 



100 



the previously described farmland/wildlife policy, the delayed cut of 
hay in Farm Meadow also ensured the successful breeding of bobolinks, 
another grassland bird in decline. Summer estimates saw more than 40 
bobolinks utilizing the 5-acre delayed cut portion of the hay field. 

Other important wildlife sightings during the year included, 
the succesful nesting of a pair of Meadowlarks in Flint's Field (the 
first pair seen in many years), and the nesting of a pair of Goshawks 
near Flint's Pond. Further, several ongoing wildlife studies also 
took place over the year. A comprehensive 2-year study undertaken by 
Lincoln resident, Mr. Steven Ells, examined the effects of suburban 
hay cropping on grassland birds, particularly bobolinks. Ranger Jane 
Layton and Administrator Geoff McGean assisted with a Harvard 
University project on butterfly species diversity, and with a Cornell 
Ornithology Laboratory study on the effects of forest fragmentation 
on neotropical bird migrants, particularly tanagers. The Commmission 
hopes to gain more information over the coming years to better 
protect wildlife habitat on conservation lands and encourages 
residents to assist with the many ongoing inventory and research 
projects. 

Ranger Program : The conservation ranger program provides a 
valuable source of education and public safety on conservation land. 
With over 50,000 hikers, bikers and horseback riders using over 2,000 
acres of conservation land during the year, the uniformed presence of 
Conservation Rangers remains an essential service to the Town. 

Led by Chief Ranger Dan Reppucci, the rangers continued their 
successful summer educational walk series. Rangers Jane Layton, 
Diana Ryan, Anne Harrer, Mary Mcintosh and several volunteers led 
walks ranging from the natural history of Tanner's Brook to organic 
farming on conservation land. 

The busy summer months also saw increased enforcement and 
protection efforts around the Town's drinking water supply, Flint's 
Pond. Cooperation and financial assistance from the Water 
Commissioners allowed for more ranger support around Flint's Pond. 
This increased support resulted in rangers issuing over 75 official 
warnings and citations for violations in and around the Pond. Some 
of these violations included trespassing, wading, swimming and 
fishing. 

The donation boxes at Mt. Misery, the Schools and the Lincoln 
Woods parking lot continue to be a source of support for the ranger 
program. Money contributed to these boxes helps to offset the cost 
of the ranger program and ongoing trail maintenance activities. 
Additional funds are collected through direct donations to the 
Commission and group user fees. Together, these sources of revenue 
contributed over $3,300 in 1994. 



101 



CONSERVATION LAND MANAGEMENT 

Trails : On the Warner parcel, a heavily used trail that passed 
through a wooded swamp was re-located to a more upland location in 
order to protect the wetland from trail use impacts. New water bars 
were constructed to reduce erosion at Pine Hill and Mt. Misery using 
Lincoln Guide Service volunteers in the spring, and general public 
volunteers in the fall. Additional water bars were installed on the 
Mt. Misery to Adams Woods trail and existing water bars throughout 
town were cleaned out and repaired as needed. Water bars intercept 
and divert water flowing down a trail, thus minimizing erosion. 

Increased use of Lincoln's trails by mountain bikes has begun 
to cause trail degradation throughout town, particularly on steep 
slopes and in wetland areas. In order to further alleviate the 
effects of increased mountain bike usage, the Conservation Commission 
and Lincoln Land Conservation Trust sponsored a series of public 
meetings and discussions and adopted a policy to restrict bike access 
in the coming year. Land management activities in support of this 
effort included the placement of temporary signs and ordering/ 
placement of permanent markers. 

Fields : As previously described, on the Farm Meadow parcel a 
rare Henslow's Sparrow was sighted and determined to be nesting 
within an area designated as as a Bobolink nesting/delayed mowing 
area. Land management efforts included staking out the observation 
area for the nesting birds and the placement of signs to keep 
birdwatchers off the active hay production field. 

Additional work during the year included repair of the Ricci 
parcel dam that controls the level of an agricultural pond. 
Continued mowing of grass and brush in open fields and along edges on 
approximately 50 acres took place in accordance with a brush 
management plan that attempts to enhance wildlife habitat in certain 
areas. The repair/rebuild of the 1980 brush mower was also 
accomplished. 

Town Plantings and Tree Care ; Ornamental plantings took place 
at the Lexington Road Cemetery, Bemis Hall, and Three-cornered 
Cemetery. A 12-ft. replacement red maple was planted along South 
Great Road. Continued care of roadside and town property trees and 
ornamentals involved pruning, cabling, mulching, fertilization, and 
watering. Assistance was provided to the Tree Warden by marking and 
preparing a list of roadside trees for the annual removal hearing. 
Additional ongoing work with the Tree Warden involves initiating an 
inventory and assessment program for existing roadside and town 
property trees and developing a long-term planting schedule. 

Other Projects : Snow removal was a major function at the 
beginning of the year because of record snowfall (road clearing 
assistance and Conservation parking area plowing) . At the 
Conservation parking lots, guardrails were repaired, surfaces were 
graded, and sight lines were kept clear of brush and grass. Other 



102 



projects included hazard tree removal, Brush Dump care and closing of 
the Stump Dump, new gate installation, sign repair, mechanical 
maintenance, and litter pick-up (constant). A cooperative land 
management program with students from Minuteman Tech was also 
established. Students will be learning about and undertaking 
forestry practices on Lincoln's conservation lands with supervision 
from Minuteman Tech instructors and the Conservation Land Manager. 



103 



THE LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Robert C. Brannen 

Paul Brooks 

Margaret P. Flint 

John C. Goodrich 

William A. King 

Gwyneth Loud 

Richard K. Nichols 

Robert H. Webb 

William G. Constable, Chairman 

Land stewardship involves cultivating the users as well as the 
land, and many efforts of the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust had 
that orientation during 1994. Through new public meeting 
initiatives, existing publications, and a memorable play in Bemis 
Hall, the LLCT promoted philosophical and pragmatic dialog about 
Lincoln's open space and environmental ethics. Annual trail 
maintenance and land acquisition also experienced sizable gains. 

In the fall, the Land Trust sponsored a biographical play about 
Rachel Carson performed by the playwright, Kaolani Lee. The 
afternoon performance was spellbinding due to Ms. Lee's presentation, 
Ms. Carson's life, and an entertaining dialog after the performance 
by Ms. Lee and Paul Brooks, Rachel Carson's editor and biographer. 

As recreational demands on our open space continue to increase, 
the LLCT and Lincoln Conservation Commission collaborated again on 
managing trail use. After substantial public debate, the Lincoln 
Land Conservation Trust and the Lincoln Conservation Commission 
adopted a policy restricting mountain bikes to specified trails and 
times of the year for calendar year 1995. These organizations have 
appointed an advisory committee to oversee the implementation and 
evaluation of this policy, and to participate in consideration of an 
amended policy for 1996. 

Protecting important open space in Lincoln remains a central 
priority for the LLCT. Three conservation restrictions and one 
property acquisition are hallmarks for 1994, especially as each 
supplements existing open space and trails. The largest of these 
efforts has protected one of the most important, unprotected parcels 
in Lincoln. The former Van Leer property, consisting of almost 100 
acres adjacent to Massachusetts Audubon Society's Drumlin Farm and 
connecting to the Weston and Wayland conservation lands, was 
protected by a team effort of Massachusetts Audubon Society, the 
Rural Land Foundation, the LLCT, and the Conservation Commission. 
Through substantial donations by the Rural Land Foundation and the 
conservation fund jointly administered by the Trust and the 
Commission, twelve acres adjacent to Drumlin Farm were acquired by 
Massachusetts Audubon Society. The remaining acreage, across Old 
Sudbury Road, was purchased privately, but became severely limited in 
its development potential. The conservation restrictions on these 
parcels and the trail easements granted, provided a unique ecological 



104 



and recreational corridor stretching from Wayland and Weston through 
Lincoln to the Walden Pond State Reservation and lands of the Concord 
Land Conservation Trust. This acquisition was the climax of a decade 
of effort to protect the historic farm of the late Hans Van Leer. 

The acquisition of a substantial portion of Pine Hill by the 
Walden Woods Project provides an opportunity to acquire the last 
important unprotected, undeveloped land along Sandy Pond Road, a 
parcel which connects current existing conservation land and provides 
trails, historical, and ecological benefits to the Town. 

Active conservation initiatives continue on our boundaries, with 
ongoing activities involving the Minuteman National Historic Park, 
the Walden Pond State Reservation, the Walden Woods Project, the 
Concord Land Conservation Trust and the State's Bay Circuit Trail 
System. On a national level, the Chairman led another seminar at the 
annual meeting of the Land Trust Alliance, which now represents 
almost 1,000 land trusts across the country. 

Other activities including our first collaborative project with 
the Lincoln School Foundation, revision of the Land Trust trail map, 
continued sales of the renowned A Guide to Conservation Land in 
Lincoln and other conservation activities, have been made possible by 
the redoubled efforts of the Trustees of the LLCT as well as the 
members and volunteers who participate with the Lincoln Land 
Conservation Trust and the Lincoln Conservation Commission in their 
stewardship, acquisition, and educational activities. All deserve 
thanks and encouragement. 



105 



Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 
1994 Financial Summary 



Balance as of 12/31/93 

Lincoln Conservation Fund $ 446,006 

Fidelity Money Market Funds 34,811 

Jean W. Preston Memorial 15,447 

BayBanks 2 5,93 2 

Securities 1,120 

Total Balance 12/31/93 $ 523,317 

1994 Receipts : 

Direct Public Support (donations) 21,440 

Sale of Trail Guides 2,284 

Sale of Trail Maps 2,733 

Recycling Funds 84 

Agricultural Leases 200 

Dividends & Miscellaneous 888 
Interest: 

Lincoln Conservation Fund 14,373 

Fidelity Money Market Funds 1,725 

Jean W. Preston Memorial 611 

Baybanks 281 

Total 1994 Receipts through 12/31/94 44,618 

1994 Expenses : 

Wages & Supplies 376 

Social Security Deposits 62 

Insurance 437 

Equipment & Maintenance 101 

Mowing & Miscellaneous 210 

Legal & Filing Fees 35 

Printing & Postage 3,125 

Performance Costs 1,637 

Total 1994 Expenses through 12/31/94 ( 5,984 ) 

Acquisitions from Lincoln Conservation Fund 
Van Leer property conservation 

restriction 200,000 

Total 1994 Acquisitions through 12/31/94 ( 200,000 ) 



106 



Balance as of 12/31/94 

Lincoln Conservation Fund 260/379 

Fidelity Money Market Funds 70/796 

Jean W. Preston Memorial 16,059 

Baybanks 13/597 

Securities 

Total Balance 12/31/94 360,831 

1994 Increase/Decrease in Funds ( 162,486 ) 

1989 Conservation Fund (Flint's Field Fund) 

Balance as of 12/31/93 11/501 
1994 Donations, interest, sale of securities 12,780 

Balance as of 12/31/94 24,281 



107 



HOUSING COMMISSION 

Tom Black 

Dan Ladd 

Katharine Preston 

B. J. Scheff 

Giles Browne, Chairman 

In 1994, Lee Harrison and Susanne Werner-Ross retired from the 
Housing Commission after two terms each of industrious service. Their 
efforts on behalf of Lincoln's affordable housing have been greatly 
appreciated, and their wise counsel has indeed been missed. Dan Ladd 
was named by the Selectmen to be their appointee to the Commission, 
and Betty Jane Scheff was named by the Selectmen to fill a vacant seat 
until the 1995 Town Election. 

Operations 

The Commission has continued to administer Town-owned and 

Town-leased residential properties with the intent of bringing all 

leases and rents into fair and consistent application, given the 
confidential circumstances of each tenant. 

We have been extremely well assisted by Building Inspector Earl 
Midgley, who is our liaison with Town Offices and whose work on our 
behalf has been of great assistance in the day-to-day operations of 
administering the properties. 

In 1993, the Commission recommended to the Selectmen that, at the 
expiration of the leases for the two Mill Street houses owned by 
Minuteman Vocational Technical Institute, the Town not renew these 
leases; the rental amount required by Minuteman Vo-Tec put these 
dwellings beyond the state income guidelines for affordable housing. 
In 1994, both 10 and 16 Mill Street reverted to Minuteman for their 
management. 

After renovations between tenants, 33 Sunnyside Lane is once again 
rented to a family recommended through the Concord Housing Authority. 

The Housing Commission deeply regrets the passing of our good 
tenant Fred Murphy and extends its sympathies to his family. 

The Elderly Congregate Living unit at Codman Farmhouse was 
reviewed at mid-year by the Commission with input from most former 
members of the Housing Commission who were in attendance. The 
consensus was that the Elderly Congregate Living unit should continue 
in existance with the expectation that once outstanding legal matters 
are resolved, the occupancy rate will increase. 



108 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Ellin Fuller 

Margaret Marsh 

Andrew F. Hall, III, Chairman 

The year started off with a request by the Conservation 
Commission to again look at the process of alternative sites for the 
contact chamber. They asked that we focus specifically on the 
reservoir site at the top of Bedford Road. The Water Commissioners 
agreed to the review with the engineering firm of Weston & Sampson 
being hired to prepare a survey of the site to determine the 
feasibility of locating the contact chamber there. 

The evaluation was reviewed by an independent citizen's group 
and a public hearing was held to present the results to the abutters 
and others who felt that the site might have been an alternative to 
using conservation land. The Water Commissioners ultimately voted to 
continue the contact chamber project" on Site 3A after gathering and 
evaluating all the information. In fact, everyone seems to agree 
that Site 3A was the best site for the contact chamber after 
completion of this study. 

In March, at the annual Town Meeting, the Water Commissioners 
requested and received an appropriation for $105,000 which reduced 
the anticipated outstanding obligation for the contact chamber to 
$975,000. There was an appropriation of $25,000 to cover the cost of 
installing corrosion control equipment as required by the Federal 
Safe Drinking Water Act. The corrosion control equipment will be 
installed at Tower Road in 1995 and at the contact chamber as part of 
the construction project. The Farrar Pond Well equipment is still 
pending based upon further analysis of water quality from the well. 

In June 1994, a 180 day contract was awarded to D & C 
Construction Co., Inc., for the construction of the contact chamber. 
The contract award was for $1,394,000 and this coupled with the 
construction supervision award of $171,000 to Weston & Sampson placed 
the Water Department approximately $25,000 over the 1993 Town Meeting 
appropriation of $1,550,000. At the March 1995 Town Meeting, the 
Water Commissioners will request the additional appropriation 
necessary to cover this shortfall and the balance of the contract as 
discussed below. 

The contractor started construction in early August and 
immediately started to fall behind when they struck ledge during the 
excavation of the contact chamber. The project subsequently fell 
further behind when the concrete subcontractor failed to realize the 
scope of his work in the allotted time. At this point, in early 
December, the project is approximately eleven weeks behind schedule 
and is now due for final testing in late March. 



109 



Thus, a major portion of the project is being completed during 
the harsh winter season when it should have been done in the mid to 
late fall. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has been 
notified of the delay and it appears that they will grant an 
extension to the Town based upon its good faith effort to complete 
the project on a timely basis. 

On a more positive note, the new intake pipe has been installed 
in Flint's Pond and will be on line as part of the renovation of the 
pump house which is now scheduled to start approximately February 1, 
1995. The two 12" water pipes have been installed in Sandy Pond 
Road. One is a distribution main which has been tested and is ready 
to be put on line. It also connects to the contact chamber. The 
other 12" pipe is a transmission main for raw water to the contact 
chamber. It will be connected in conjunction with the pump house 
renovation and completion of the contact chamber. 

We did have a problem in Sandy Pond Road when the construction 
uncovered hazardous waste material which apparently was buried years 
ago as part of some land fill when Sandy Pond Road was routed around 
the Pond. The cost of removing the material is estimated to be 
approximately $186,000. This problem is outside of the 
responsibility of the Water Commissioners and funding for the removed 
hazardous waste material is being treated as part of the general 
obligations of the Town. 

We did, however, incur additional costs for removal of ledge 
and unsatisfactory fill both in the road and in the chamber 
excavation which will cost approximately $160,000. This will have to 
be appropriated at the March 1995 Town Meeting. To date, we also 
have changes to the contract which will require an additional 
appropriation of approximately $50,000. We do have cash reserves 
from the fiscal year ended June 30, 1994, which will cover these 
costs. In conclusion, it appears that the entire contact chamber 
process from the initial survey by Weston & Sampson through 
construction and supervision will cost the Water Department 
approximately $1,950,000. 

On an operating basis, the Water Department under the direction 
of Pat Allen, Water Superintendent, continues to provide quality 
water to Lincoln residents. Our goals for the future are to continue 
to improve water quality, retire our debt obligations from the 
contact chamber project, and to maintain our waiver from filtration. 



110 



Statistics as of December 31, 1994 



Miles of water main 
Hydrants in use 
Gates in use 
Blow-offs 
Services in use 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Beginning 
of Year 


Additions 


55.72 
469.0 
689.0 

53.0 
1,659.0 


0.59 

7 
10 

2 
14 




1991 




54.1 
93.6 


million 
million 

1992 


gallons 
gallons 


70.5 
92.1 


million 
million 

1993 


gallons 
gallons 


54.6 
104.8 


million 
million 

1994 


gallons 
gallons 


58.2 
96.5 


million 
million 


gallons 
gallons 



End of 


Year 


56. 


31 


476 




699 




55 




1,673 





$210,176 
$361,201 



$219,328 
$322,234 



$235,909 
$454,898 



$262,554 
$435,751 



111 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Vincent R. DeAmicis, Superintendent, Department of Public Works 

On January 3, 1994, it started to snow and the highway department 
was totally involved in snow removal until March 28, 1994. 

Due to the extreme winter and the heavy sanding, our sweeping 
operations was not completed until June 16, 1994. 

Construction of Lincoln Road and Library Lane and the handicap 
access started in July, 1994, and is to be completed by June, 1995. 

Fifteen hundred feet of water pipe was installed at the 
Cemetery. Codman Road Bike Path was constructed by the D.P.W. from 
the Fire Station to Route 126, and the finished coat will be applied 
in the Spring of 1995. 

The Town purchased a Roll-off Truck on January 1, 1994, and we 
started hauling our recyclables and rubbish ourselves. 

Six faucets were installed in the cemetery. 

All town vehicles were maintained by the D.P.W. 

Eleven hundred man hours were used to provide interdepartment 
assistance from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 1994. 

Six hundred tons of patch was applied to various roads. 

Three hundred ten work orders were completed. 

In closing I again wish to thank all for the support and 
cooperation given me in the performance of the duties of the Public 
Works Department. 



112 



PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Lynn Donaldson 
Judith C. F. Gross 
William Shea, Chairman 

Dawn Murphy, Pierce House Manager 

Use of the Pierce House as a function facility and meeting place 
for Town groups and non-residents continues at an encouraging pace. 
A recent increase in rental rates was essential to keep up with 
maintenance expenses on the nearly one hundred year old house. The 
income from private functions totally supports Pierce Park grass 
cutting, all house painting and repairs, and caretaker expenses. 

The Pierce Property Committee is looking forward to working 
closely with the new Town Executive Secretary and Building Inspector 
to resume a routine maintenance schedule and continue house 
improvements . 

We welcome comments from Town residents regarding the care and 
operating procedures for the Pierce Property. 

Pierce Property Committee 

Box 6062 

Lincoln Center, MA 01773 



113 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Natalie A. Faddoul 

Ann Janes 

Martha DeNormandie, Chairman 

Agent: Nancy J. Zuelke 

During the past year the Commission has continued to upgrade as 
well as maintain the rural guality of the cemeteries under its 
supervision. New water lines have been laid in the Lexington Road 
Cemetery with additional faucets for the convenience of lot owners. 
A new method of identifying individual lots is being instituted in 
the recently surveyed section with the use of numbered Andover 
markers. These markers are metal, deeply implanted in the ground. 
With our metal detector they can be more easily located than the 
granite markers which often get covered over with moss or earth. The 
plan is to eventually use Andover markers throughout the Lexington 
Road Cemetery. Plantings have been replaced along the edges of the 
Arbor Vitae Cemetery and restorative work on damaged monuments 
completed. 

The Commission is working on a new booklet containing rules and 
regulations which will be available to all lot owners. This 
coincides with an increase in cost of lots, the first in several 
years. 

The Department of Public Works, under Vincent DeAmicis, 
continues to provide excellent support in all aspects of cemetery 
maintenance and service to the public. Nancy Zuelke, Town Clerk, is 
our agent in Town Hall, ready to address any guestions regarding 
cemetery matters. Each Commissioner is also available to help. 

The Commission is again grateful to Warren Flint, Sr., for 
writing about the history of Lincoln's cemeteries as an addition to 
this report. Ann Janes was elected a Commissioner in March, 
replacing Jack MacLean. She will continue to contribute an 
historical dimension to our proceedings as both Jack and Warren have 
over the years. 

The Commission is deeply committed to serving townspeople in 
every way possible and to maintaining the cemeteries as places of 
simple beauty and serenity. 

There were 18 lots sold in 1994 and 34 interments. 



114 



Arbor Vitae Cemetery 
Prepared by Warren F. Flint, Sr. 

Of the Town of Lincoln's four cemeteries, the Arbor Vitae which 
was started in 1837 is the third oldest. The earliest, the Precinct 
Cemetery, dates from 1747, and the Town Hill Cemetery from 1756. 

As one reviews the history of the cemeteries from the 
community's beginning, very few Town Meetings have not had an article 
in the warrant about cemeteries. Many committees were formed to 
study this subject, and all too frequently a given committee's report 
was not accepted, and a new committee was formed. The discussions 
centered on the need for additional space, location, upkeep of 
fences, walls, grounds, etc. 

In 1835 it was determined that more land for cemeteries should 
be purchased, as near as possible to the meetinghouse. In April 
1837, on advice of a committee, the Town voted to purchase from Mr. 
Henry Rice three quarters of an acre bounded by Lexington Road, 
Trapelo Road, and Old Lexington Road. Over time walls were built 
around the perimeter of this land on three sides, and a planting of 
spruces and an attractive rail fence bounded the west side. Later 
arbor vitae plantings were made on all but the Lexington Road side — 
hence the name. Lots were layed out in orderly fashion, and bounded 
by numbered granite markers. 

This cemetery took on a more formal layout and appearance than 
that of the two earlier cemeteries which had no formal layout. In 
general, the Arbor Vitae reflected the taste and style of its 
mid-nineteenth century period. The traditional eighteenth century 
slate was succeeded by granite or marble for gravestones. 

There is a predominance in this cemetery of simple marble 
gravestones, some plain, and some with bas or haut relief floral 
carvings for ornamentation. Unfortunately, some of these marble 
stones have tended to erode over time, and the inscriptions are not 
easily read. 

Some of the memorial stones give evidence of wealth. Granite 
obelisks appeared for the first time, standing tall - some eight or 
more feet in height. Family names and dates are inscribed on the 
four sides of these monuments, and in some instances small individual 
gravestones, one for each family member, lie in a row below the base 
of the monument. 

There are also a few very tall architecturally ornamented 
monuments, and several "cenotaphs" that are massive, and of unusual 
design; in general, these, too, were "family monuments". 

The earliest interment in this cemetery dates from the 1830s; 
there have been few interments here in recent years. Families of the 
Arbor Vitae Cemetery are still represented by descendants in town 
today. There are names familiar to us because they represent 



115 



families which have provided leadership and service to the Town, 
among them: Chapin, DeNormandie, Hartwell, and Tarbell. Several 
ministers are interred in this cemtery: the Rev. Seth Alden, the Rev. 
William Lawrence Stearns, and Dr. James DeNormandie of the Unitarian 
Congregational Society, and the Rev. Henry Jackson of the 
Congregational Church. The Rev. William Trask (of Taunton), and Dr. 
Ephraim Flint (of Hinsdale) are also buried here. 

In this cemetery, one has not only a sense of century past, but 
an intimation of the strong and varied membership of a community that 
lived and worked together. 



116 



LINCOLN HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Eleanor H. Fitzgerald 

Kenneth E. Hurd 

Mary G. Spindler 

Thomas C. Wang 

James B. White 

Colin M. Smith, Chairman 

Abigail S. Congdon, Alternate 

This past year a great deal of time was spent in responding to 
the Selectmen's program to improve Lincoln Road. This proposal 
generated many meetings and a great deal of discussion in an effort 
by the Commission to keep the road looking as much like a country 
road as possible. The safety issues brought out by the residents 
appear to have been adequately addressed, but with rather more 
granite curbing and stone wall than the Commission would have 
wished. The treatment at the horse trough at the five corners is 
incomplete and will be revisited in the spring when the road will be 
given its final surface. 

The Commission investigated the possibility of placing telephone 
and power lines underground at the Town Center whilst the road 
project was in progress. Unfortunately, this process normally takes 
two-to-three years. The Commission does feel it to be a desirable 
goal for the future, but it will require wide support from the Town 
since it is relatively costly. 

A Certificate of Appropriateness was granted for an addition to 
32 Lincoln Road. The Commission also gave approval for the Brooks 
Middle School to use Pierce Park for the Town soccer program. This 
was due to the construction at the school. 

The Library Trustees came before the Commission with the 

proposal to improve the entrance to the Library and to provide a 

parking space for the handicapped. Their proposal was approved after 
some modification. 



117 



ROUTE 12 8 AREA COMMITTEE 

Susan Carr 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

John Hammond 

Beth S. Ries, Chairman 

In keeping with its charge, the Committee monitored real estate 
development activities in the Route 128/Waltham area and pursued 
long-term solutions to traffic impacts which large scale developments 
in this area could impose on the Town of Lincoln. 

The focus of the Committee's attention was Old County Road in 
Waltham. In late 1993, the Polaroid Corporation, which owns a 64 
acre parcel fronting on Old County, issued an environmental notifi- 
cation form for a proposed office developement on the site. The 
complex will most likely house the company's corporate headquarters, 
currently located in Cambridge. 

The Committee submitted its comments on the notification form, 
offering specific recommendations with regard to a traffic study 
Polaroid had agreed to undertake. The Committee also submitted its 
comments on the resulting study, which clearly spelled out the 
impacts the Polaroid project would have on Lincoln Road. 

The Committee Chairman and the Chairman of the Historic District 
Commission subsequently met with the Executive Director of the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission and representatives of Polaroid 
to discuss the effects of increased traffic through Lincoln Center. 
Although no agreement on mitigation was reached, Polaroid agreed to 
meet with Lincoln officials for further discussions. 

Committee and Town representatives continued their dialogue with 
Polaroid officials regarding the discontinuance of a portion of Old 
County Road. Polaroid is not expected to actively oppose the 
discontinuance, as their current development plan limits access to 
emergency vehicles only. 

In July, residents of Waltham living on or adjacent to Old County 
Road, submitted a petition to the Mayor of Waltham seeking his 
support of the discontinuance. With the understanding that the Mayor 
would be supportive, the residents delivered their discontinuance 
petitions in September to the Middlesex County Commissioners, who 
have jurisdiction over Old County Road. The Town of Lincoln followed 
suit with petitions in support of the closing, which has townwide 
approval as voiced during traffic issue meetings organized by the 
Planning Board. 



118 



Although the Chairman and a representative of the Waltham 
residents met with the Chairman of the County Commissioners, their 
official response was significantly delayed. However, hearings on 
the petitions are expected to take place early in 1995. 

The likelihood of accelerated development in the 128 area has 
increased with the upturn in the commercial real estate market during 
1994. As an example, Bay Colony announced that it would commence 
construction of the final phase of its office complex on Winter 
Street. The Committee will follow this and other projects closely 
and assess their potential traffic impacts on local roads. 



119 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Barbara Beal 

Elaine Bloom 

Debra Haiduven 

Daniel Spaeth 

Eleanor M. Wilfert, Chairman 

At a meeting in February, the Committee approved the request of 
Bemis Hall resident users for a storm window in the kitchen. As 
there was still a little money left from our original appropriation, 
the Committee approved the expenditure and Joe Mannarino would 
install it. 

In May a discussion ensued relating to the capacity of the main 
upstairs room and the number of chairs available. Corrections would 
be made on the application for Use of Bemis Hall to make information 
less confusing to applicants. 

Also at the May meeting, the Committee felt that the present 
restriction on dancing should be maintained even after the 
installation of the new floor which took place in February and 
March. The Selectmen have since reviewed the "dancing clause" and 
lifted the restriction. 

During the summer Elaine Bloom contacted three drapery/shade 
dealers about darkening the windows upstairs for slide showing, etc. 
during the day. That proved to be much too expensive for the budget. 

In the fall months much discussion has ensued about the piano in 
Upper Bemis. Should it be rebuilt? Should it be tuned? Should it 
be put out for bid? We are only an Advisory Committee and would 
prefer not to be involved in this process. It was suggested that a 
Sub-Committee be appointed, preferably by the Selectmen, to continue 
the work of the Lincoln Cultural Council. BHAC is not opposed to 
suggesting Rules and Regulations in the Care and Use of the Piano 
once the delicate work has been completed. 

It was reiterated that painting white lines for parking was not 
in keeping with the historical building. 

The Recreation Department has had to have some gymnastic 

equipment in the Upper Hall for classes due to the school 

renovation. Hopefully, Recreation will soon have a spot at the 
Hartwell School for classes in the future. 

Should Bemis Hall be rented for commercial use? BHAC feels this 
should be watched very carefully and definitely not be given 
preference over present resident users. If using Bemis Hall in this 
way becomes abusive, new fee schedules and/or new rules might be 
suggested. 



120 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 

Jeff Brown 

Jonathan Church 

Suze Craig 

Nancy Fleming 

Jonathan Hickok 

Beth Lerman, Clerk 

Heidi Nichols, Vice-President 

David O'Neil 

Steve Perlmutter 

Carla Ricci 

Marcia Roehr, Treasurer 

Bill Stason 

Fan Watkinson 

Pam Wilson 

Tom DeNormandie, President 

Larry Fleckstein, Farm Manager 
Anne Papadopoulos, Assistant 

As a community organization, Codman Community Farms continues to 
grow and prosper. Last year CCF took a major step in its coming of 
age when the Board of Directors unanimously selected Larry Fleckstein 
to replace Dave Hardy as the Farm Manager. Dave had been at Codman 
since October of 1989 and deserves much of the credit for 
establishing the strong farming programs that CCF enjoys today. So 
it was at the end of July that we warmly wished Dave the very best on 
his own farm in upstate New York and welcomed Larry to Codman 
Community Farms and the Town of Lincoln and the inevitable changes 
that will arrive with him. 

Other signs of growth include total farm memberships at an all 
time high as well as participation in all farm activities. This past 
year all tickets for the Winter Auction sold out in advance, the Lamb 
BBQ/Harvest Fair was one of the most successful ever, the 
Pick-Your-Own Flower Garden was a great success and the Trail Race 
continues to grow. All this while continuing to offer farm tours, 
monthly events and the educational programs with the surrounding 
schools such that kids can experience farm life, seeing animals up 
close and the satisfaction of growing their own plants and vegetables. 

The final element of CCF's continued development this year was 
the farm's successful public announcement of The Green Fund, a 
campaign to raise $500,000 for the purpose of "seeding and securing" 
Codman Community Farms' future. The Green Fund consists of two funds 
through which CCF can continue to enrich the community. The first is 
The Endowment Fund, the interest from which will be used to help pay 
for agricultural programs, educational and community activities 
central to the mission of the farm. The second is The Capital Fund 
which will provide a cash reserve for major equipment needs and other 
capital requirements. 



121 



Why the Green Fund? Today any small farm, operating at the scale 
of CCF, has difficulty breaking even. Even with the best management, 
the uncertainties of weather, broken eguipment, crop variations, and 
staff changes, all conspire to undo the tightest budgets. 

The Green Fund will help CCF further strengthen its agricultural 
programs, and help ensure that Lincoln will continue to enjoy hands 
on education about f arming. .. care and conservation of open land... a 
variety of breeds of livestock, and a focal point for community 
activities and involvement in agriculture. 

On the farm program side, CCF continues to evolve. Currently the 
farm has seven Lineback dairy cows, seven Devon beef cattle, one 
Belted Galloway heifer (expecting in Mid-April 1995) and five 
crossbreed yearling calves. In addition, the farm has four Tamworth 
sows, one Tamworth boar, six feeders (a young pig) and 15 piglets. 

Over the course of 1994 twelve Cotswold sheep were introduced to 
the farm with the intention of replacing much of the existing Suffolk 
sheep flock. In comparison to the Suffolk sheep, Cotswold sheep are 
a minor breed who's wool is much more valuable. Also introduced to 
the farm this year is a poultry program offering fresh chicken to 
local customers. Currently this on trial basis with 130 Rock Cornish 
crosses . 

This year the haying program put up over 14,000 bales. This is 
up from the year before, but still f rustratingly lower than hoped due 
to a lack of rain. Total number of acres managed by the farm 
remained the same as last year at approximately 150 townwide. 

As CCF continues to grow we remain committed to our mission: to 
carry on the three-hundred year tradition of Lincoln's agricultural 
heritage, to use Lincoln's open land for productive, conscientiously 
managed farming, and to provide a model of working agriculture for 
the educational, social and scenic benefit of Lincoln and beyond. 

In closing, in any given year there always is the natural ebb and 
flow of members on and off the Board of Directors. This year 
however, Codman, like the community as a whole, lost more than just a 
Board member with the passing of David Donaldson. David was a true 
believer and an advocate for why an organization such as Codman 
Community Farms is so important for a town like Lincoln to support 
and nuture. As a Board member his articulate leadership, quick wit 
and common sense made us all feel more sure of ourselves. He will be 
greatly missed. 



122 



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125 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

William G. Constable, Lincoln Representative 

Vice President, MAPC 

Metropolitan Boston has 101 municipalities, incredibly diverse 
in economies, ethnologies, and ecologies. This region is one web, 
however, networked such that prosperity in any one area depends upon 
the well-being of the whole. The Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
(MAPC) is the single forum within which Lincoln speaks with other 
communities, state agencies, authorities, and the federal government 
about matters which affect this metropolitan region, including 
transportation, environmental guality, housing, open space, municipal 
operations, and economic development. 

Transportation issues continued to dominate the MAPC agenda in 
1994, as the Council battled to keep the region's cities and towns at 
the table as federal monies are diverted to fund cost escalations at 
Boston's Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel. Regional transportation 
planning efforts have been supported to ensure that the metropolitan 
area's most important public works project does not jeopardize 
transportation throughout the rest of Eastern Massachusetts. In more 
local transportation matters, MAPC continues to provide 
organizational and staff support to the Hanscom Area Town Study 
Committee (HATS), Route 2 Corridor Advisory Committee, and ongoing 
transportation matters along Route 128. 

MAPC also focuses on other governmental activities, which affect 
development, economic growth, and environmental quality. For example 
new septic system regulations promise to improve water quality, but 
could dramatically increase sprawl by permitting houses on land which 
previously could not support septic systems. MAPC also endeavors to 
inform its constituent communities about issues such as the Safe 
Water Drinking Act/ the Clean Water Act, the "Wise Use movement", and 
"Growing Smart legislation", all of which have the capacity to affect 
the quality of life in Lincoln as well as both the metropolitan 
region's quality of life and its long term economic potential. 

The Metropolitan Data Center of MAPC continues to develop, now 
providing the most accessible public repository for current 
demographic, economic and geographic information systems computer 
data. MAPC has provided Lincoln with such data about the Town, and 
is able to provide a broad array of mapping and data analysis for the 
town or private use. 

In 1994, Lincoln officially joined the MAPC subregional group 
entitled the Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination 
(MAGIC). MAGIC, which consists of ten communities generally in the 
Route 2 corricor, reviews developments of regional impacts, 
participates in transportation decision-making, and coordinates 
planning activities. A subregional Housing Task Force and an 
ambitious year-long economic development project within the subregion 



126 



began this year, with participation from the Lincoln Planning Board 
and Board of Selectmen. 

Your Lincoln representative continues as the Vice President of 
MAPC and one of the four town representatives on the MAPC Executive 
Committee. Town organizations and interested residents may acquire 
additional information about the Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
and its activities through the Selectmen's office. 



127 



LINCOLN PERSONNEL BOARD 

Kathy Nicholson 

Beth Ries 

Scott Lathrop, Chairman 

The primary task before the Personnel Board this year was to 
conduct a survey of fringe benefits provided by comparable/ 
neighboring towns to its employees. The purpose of this survey was 
to make sure that the Town continues to be fair, equitable and 
competitive in its treatment of Town employees in regard to fringe 
benefits and that the Town maintains its ability to attract and keep 
the level of employee that it has come to expect and enjoy. The 
results of the survey were largely positive, revealing that in most 
aspects the Town was at least as generous as were its comparable, 
neighboring towns. 

During this year the Board also made several revisions in the 
Employee Handbook, reflecting various personnel changes to meet the 
needs of the Town and its employees. 

The Board also met several times during the year to deal with ad 
hoc personnel issues as they arose. For the most part, the non-union 
personnel system instituted several years ago and monitored 
periodically by the Board seems to be functioning fairly well. 



128 



LIBRARY, RECREATION & SCHOOLS 

TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Term Expires 

Emily Althausen Self-Perpetuating 

Bruce Bare Selectmen's Appointee 1996 

Douglas Harding Self-Perpetuating 

Linda May Elected 1995 

Nancy Rote School Committee Appointee 1997 

Craig Hill, Chairman Self-Perpetuating 



OVERVIEW 

Jerry Cirillo's arrival in mid-January as Library Director was 
undoubtedly this year's single most significant change at the 
Library. However, as the Trustees had hoped, the main effect of that 
change has been to continue and even to broaden the Library's long 
tradition of community service by a dedicated and responsive staff 
that is very much a team. A good indication of stability can be seen 
in the fact that we had no staff turnover during the year. 

Our budget line item for books and materials grew from $42,000 
to $50,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1995, a welcome 
continuation by the Finance Committee of the trend towards 
restoration of our book budget to former levels. Weekly hours open 
rose to 57 from 53 in fiscal year 1994. 

But in each category, books bought and hours open, town fiscal 
constraints and the effects of inflation still prevented a full 
return to past levels. For that reason, the Library again had to 
look further for supplemental funds - to the Commonwealth, to 
generous individual citizens, and, as always and above all, to the 
creative and spirited efforts of our wonderful Friends of the Lincoln 
Library. Our need for help from all these sources is sure to 
continue in the future. 

The safety and convenience of the Library - and, it is hoped, 
its aesthetic appearance - were improved by the widening of Library 
Lane and by the long-awaited construction of a finished entry for the 
building, combining a set of lighted steps from the roadway with a 
bluestone entry terrace and a separate, off-road handicapped parking 
slot. Colin Smith contributed greatly to our arriving at a buildable 
design in a difficult public bidding process that had to be repeated 
after the first bids came in far above the amount we had available. 
Thanks are due to Liz Corcoran who coordinated the many meetings to 
plan the project and to Vinnie DeAmicis of the DPW, who supervised 
construction. 

With the completion of a properly sized handicapped parking 
space, the Library building at last became eligible to receive a 
permanent occupancy permit, which it had lacked in the years since 
the completion of the new addition and which it required if the Town 



129 



was to be eligible for the final $140,000 State reimbursement for our 
construction expense. This was authorized for payment in December. 

In the coming year, the Trustees hope to initiate two other 
important projects. One, for the long term, is a terrace outside the 
glass door in the lower hallway linking the old and new buildings. 
This will continue the process of finishing the building exterior and 
will provide a pleasant, outdoor space for warm weather reading and 
social functions. We have a preliminary design by the landscape 
architect, Tom Wirth, available for inspection. 

The second, more immediate project will be to bring the staff 
workroom, behind the circulation desk, up to a higher standard of 
comfort and efficiency. Here is where incoming new books are 
catalogued and prepared for circulation, interlibrary loans are 
received or gathered for sending out, and financial and other 
recordkeeping is done - and it is an environment that greatly needs 
improving. Library patrons are invited to step behind the scenes to 
see for themselves what the staff has patiently and good-humoredly 
put up with for too long. 

STAFF 

Ellen Sisco ably se ""-ed as Director during the difficult interim 
period from Kathy Gli Weil's departure in September, 1993 until 
Jerry Cirillo took ov on January 13 of this year. With Jerry's 
arrival and Kathy Brobeck's return from her leave of absence in India 
in March, the staff came back to full strength, equivalent to 10 
full-time positions. 

TRUSTEES 

No changes. Board sub-committees were: Building and Grounds , 
Emily Althausen and Craig Hill; Personnel , Doug Harding and Linda 
May; Collections , Bruce Bare and Nancy Rote. 

MONEY, TIME, MATERIALS 

Town Meeting approved an overall budget rise of 6.7% from FY 94, 
excluding cost-of-living increases. This action allowed our line 
item for materials - books, CD's, etc. - to rise by 19%, from $42,000 
to $50,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1995. It also allowed 
restoration of the Director's position to full-time status and 4 
additional hours of Library time open per week, thus permitting the 
Library to remain open on Friday and Sunday afternoons during the 
winter months. 

But despite an easier budget situation over all, the continued 
escalation of wages and salaries throughout the Town meant that the 
portion of our total budget that remained available to us for books 
and materials was still well short of the $60,000 for materials 
provided by the Town in FY 91. Thus, to continue in 1994 to meet 



130 



state requirements for eligibility for State Library aid and for 
Massachusetts Library Board accreditation we had to find - and spend 
- for books and materials $23,000 more than the Town provided. These 
additional funds were acquired from several sources - many generous 
individual contributors, listed below; the Friends organization; 
and various State payments and reimbursements. 

Since the Trustees might reasonably anticipate further such 
needs in the long term, they intend in 1995 to begin exploration of 
fundraising options, including the creation of a permanent Library 
endowment fund. 

CELEBRATIONS 

As every year, assorted Library enthusiasts built a float for 
the 4th of July Town parade. Our theme, inscribed on the banner that 
floated above the flatbed truck (once again, obligingly contributed 
for the day by Tracey's Service Station), was the message "Put Rancor 
to Bed." We won the red ribbon for Most Beautiful Float, though the 
Trustees could see by many puzzled looks from spectators along the 
parade route that Most Enigmatic might have been more to the point. 

Though George Foreman once again failed to show up, Boxing Day 
at the Library was celebrated for the third year in a row and seems 
likely to be on the way to becoming a tradition. The Trustees intend 
it to provide a warmly informal occasion for Lincolnians of all ages 
to drop in for conversation and holiday refreshments. Everyone mark 
your calendar for Tuesday evening, Decern! 26, 1995. 

BUILDING AND GROUNDS 

As described above, Library Lane was widened and an entry to the 
building constructed with a separate handicapped parking space. The 
Trustees commissioned a preliminary design by Thomas Wirth 
Associates, Landscape Architects for a terrace in the space between 
the old and new sections of the building, to be constructed as funds 
become available. 

FRIENDS 

The Friends organization remains our group of guardian angels. 
Their monthly Book Sale at Bemis Hall, a feat of sorting, pricing and 
heavy lifting in confined quarters captained by Mary Irwin and Heddie 
Kent, attracts book-lovers and book-dealers from all over and is a 
major source of the invaluable supplemental funds the Friends 
generate each year. 

In May, the Friends sponsored an appreciate luncheon for the 
Library staff. In October, with the aid of the Lincoln Historical 
Society, they treated the Town to a historical tour, "Pickles and 
Pastures," which introduced busloads of townspeople to aspects of 
Lincoln's past of which very few had probably been aware. Special 



131 



thanks are due Roger Gordy, who designed the Pickle Bus logo for the 
occasion, and who has given the Library and/or the Friends the 
benefit of his talents as a graphics designer for many different 
occasions and purposes. 

Additionally, the Friends gave the Library a new audio-visual 
center for the Children's Room; they funded special programs for 
children both over the summer and throughout the school year, as well 
as others for adults and families; and they paid for group passes to 
5 major cultural centers: the Museum of Fine Arts; The Museum of 
Science; the Boston Aquarium; the Massachusetts Audubon Society at 
Drumlin Farm, and the DeCordova Museum. The passes are available on 
request at the circulation desk. 

GRANTS 

With federal funds provided under the Library Services and 
Construction Act and administered through the Massachusetts Board of 
Library Commissioners, the Library in 1994 implemented two worthwhile 
reading and educational program. The first, "On the Road to 
Literature: Supporting the Reading Process," was coordinated by 
Children's Librarians Amy Gavalis and Jane Flanders. With the $3,750 
grant the Library added 364 new books and 66 new book/cassette 
packages to its collection of transitional reading materials and, 
along with this acquisition, the Children's Department presented four 
public programs that focussed on the reading process, one at Hanscom 
and another co-sponsored with the Lincoln Elementary Schools PTA. 
The second of these, a Books-on-Tape Collection development grant of 
$5,000 that was coordinated by Ellen Sisco, brought the Library 136 
new unabridged books-on-tape, 71 for the Children's Room and 65 for 
the Adult Department collection. 

The Library also received a payment of $140,000 as the second, 
and final, installment of a $200,000 total grant through the 
Massachusetts Public Library Construction program. Initially awarded 
in 1989, this final installment was only appropriated and authorized 
for distribution in 1994 to those libraries that had satisfactorily 
completed their construction programs - for which it was essential 
that the handicapped parking space was complete. This grant was paid 
to the Town to reduce its outstanding construction debt for the 
Library addition. 

As the Library met the Massachusetts Board of Library 
Commissioners State Certification requirements in 1994 it once again 
qualified for three State Aid payments, a Library Incentive grant of 
$3,833; a Municipal Equalization grant of $1,779.49; and a 
Non-resident Circulation offset award of $7,517, a total of 
$13,129.49. 



132 



The Massport Community Summer Jobs Program provided the Library 
with two student workers during the summer of 1994. Becky Cooper, a 
U.N.H. student/ and Andrea Kamins, a Lincoln-Sudbury student, 
assisted with several special projects and gave very capable 
assistance at the circulation desk. 

PROGRAMS 

In our programs we again attempted to provide an eclectic mix 
appealing to a wide variety of tastes and intellectual interests. 
Among the offerings were: 

Classic Jazz at the Lincoln Library , which highlighted its 12th 

season with its annual live performance night. This year, on June 1, 

Ray Smith's Paramount Jazz Band entertained an enthusiastic audience 
of more than 150 jazzophiles. 

William on Wednesday - a revival of our Shakespearean play-reading 
group. Bravo! 

Friday Morning Book Group , Ellen Sisco's thought -provoking discussion 
group that focussed this year on the families in literature: "The 
Family Seen (Scene)." 

Two special series were presented at the Library in 1994: "BYO 
(Bring Your Own) Writer's Workshop," co-sponsored by the Lincoln 
Review and led by Suze Craig, combined several creative writing 
critique sessions with three public evening lectures on the writing 
and publishing world; and "Writers Reading," which featured area 
writers from the Kenmore Writers Group and the Forum for Creative 
Writing at Bentley College in another three evenings of readings. 

The Children's Room presented a full complement of programs for 
kids of all ages. Story Hour, craft activities, and Book Bunch, a 
discussion group for children in grades 1 through 3, as well as 
special holiday programs, were attended by capacity crowds through 
the course of the year. Highlights among these were a Winter 
Solstice celebration with Celtic fiddlers Jerry and Nancy Bell; a 
very upbeat (and interactive) storytelling and musical performance by 
Tribal Rhythms; an Origami workshop for older kids; and Linda 
Myers' portrayal of Amelia Earhart. 

The Ticket to Read summer reading program transformed the 
Children's Room into a train station, as hundreds (yes) of kids took 
book trips with their make-believe train tickets punched once for 
each new book they read. 

It needs to be repeated once again that the great majority of 
the Library's program activities, particularly but not only those for 
children, are funded by the contributions of the Friends of the 
Lincoln Library. It is their support that allows our extraordinary 
staff the means to plan and carry out our ambitious and successful 
series of programs. 



133 



GIFTS 



Although the Trustees decided again this year not to make a 
townwide appeal for funds, the Library was again the beneficiary of a 
number of generous, unsolicited gifts. It is gratifying to the 
Trustees and to all the staff that the Library continues to be 
well thought of by our patrons. 



so 



Contributions included a gift by Alan and Laura Eschenroeder in 
memory of Lorraine B. Eschenroeder, earmarked for the purchase of 
materials on natural history and ecology and allowing the Library to 
add over 60 new books as well as several audio and video cassettes to 
its collection; many contributions for the purchase of jazz CDs, in 
memory of Carl W. Anderson, a longtime member of the Classic Jazz 
group; $2,000 from the Friends, the proceeds from their Lit'ry Tour 
of England in 1993, for custom-built book-on-tape storage units in 
the DeNormandie Room. 



134 



WEDNESDAY MORNING AT THE LIBRARY 1994 - "Neighbors All' 



January 12 
February 9 
March 9 
April 13 
October 12 
November 9 



John Bingham 
Trish Adams 
Michael Bel anger 
John LeGates 
Elaine Bloom 
Andy Falender 



Exhibitors in the Gallery 1994 

Gladys Johnson 

Joe Sussman 

LS - Regional High School 

Jennie Symonds-Greeson 

Hartwell and Brooks Schools 

Diana Rust 

Bill Bright 

Robin Doland 

Mary Moncrief 

Lincoln Artists 

Alex Maclean 

Nancy Eddy 

Exhibitors in the DeNormandie Room 1994 

Kathie Brobeck 
Stephanie Kornfeld 
Ellen Mylin 
Lincoln Artists 
Gladys Johnson 
Linda Sjolander 
Larry Zuelke 

STAFF 1994 



Jerry Cirillo 

Ellen Sisco 

Lisa Acker Rothenberg 

Amy Gavalis 

Jane Flanders 

Jeanne Bracken 

Sheila Williams 

Lee Donahue 

Carolyn Birmingham 

Kathy Rushby 

Kathie Brobeck 

Ann Cheney 

Dana Weigent 

Marcia Bibring 

Susan Sugar 

Sherry Hagenian 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Technical Services Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Senior Library Technician 

Bookkeeper 

Circulation Assistant (On leave thru March 1) 

Circulation Assistant 

Children's Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant (Jan. - Feb.) 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 



135 



John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 
Ruth Dietmeier 
Andrea Kamins 
Becky Cooper 



Custodian 

Custodian 

Page 

Summer Intern 

Summer Intern 



HOURS 1994 

(Jan. - June) 

Monday 

Tuesday, Thursday 

Wednesday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

(closed Sundays after April 30) 



1:00 pm to 8:30 pm 
9:00 am to 6:00 pm 
9:00 am to 8:30 pm 
9:00 am to 2:00 pm 
10:00 am to 5:00 pm 
1:00 pm to 5:00 pm 



(July - Aug. ) 

Monday 

Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 

Wednesday 



1:00 pm to 8:30 pm 
9:00 am to 6:00 pm 
9:00 am to 8:30 pm 



(Sept. - Oct. 15) 

Same as above except open Saturdays 10:00 am - 5:00 pm 

(Oct. 16 - Dec. 31) 

Same as above except open Sundays 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm 

LIBRARY VO LUNTEERS 1994 



Patty Arena 
Marsha Bibring 
Gene Darling 
Martha DeNormandie 
Jim Faran 
Roger Gordy 
B. Grim 
Roger Harris 



Charles Hersch 
Jeanne Kennedy 
Bill Poisson 
Barbara Sisson 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Susan Sugar 
Ed Williams 



And Special Thanks to: 

Jo Ann England, the Board, and The Friends of the Lincoln Library. 
Thanks to everyone who made the Pickles to Pastures Tour such a 
landmark event! 



The Library is grateful to the many people who gave books, 
tapes, and other items to support the collection during the year, 



CDs, 



They include 



Tracey Barron 
L. Beenhouwer 
Melvin Bernstein 
Jim Birmingham 



Jane Herlacher 

Charles Hopkins 

Ann Hubbard 

Eliot & Margaret Hubbard 



136 



Judy Branfman 

Nancy Braasch 

Howard & Andrea Brower 

Pauline Buchanan 

T. Brenton Bullock 

Joseph Byrnes 

Ciarmaglia Family 

Thomas Cone 

Cottage Press 

Kits Culver 

Sam Donnell 

J. Russell Elkinton 

Nancy Ellis 

Lori Foley 

Edward Foster 

Elin Fuller 

David Garrison 

Molly Gayley 

Gerechter Family 

William Gifnapp 

David Godine 

B Grim 

Allan Groves 

Charles & MaryAnn Hales 

Ruth & Norman Hapgood 

Jeanne Healy 

Sharl Heller 



Hamilton James 

Ed Koppelman 

Nancy LeGates 

Barbara Low 

Ludwig Luft 

Peg Marsh 

Lennie & Frannie Mo: 

Janet Mundt 

Jean Palmer 

Roy Raja 

Nancy Redpath 

Lisa Rothenberg 

Henry Rugo 

Benson Scheff 

Esther Shapiro 

William Schecter 

Bill Swift 

Tom Szekfly 

Tim Taylor 

Kara & Rufus Urion 

Meredith Warshaw 

Bella Wheeler 

Molly White 

Sheila Williams 

Elizabeth Winship 

Lee Young 



Magazine Gift Subscriptions were received from the following people 



John Boyer 

Kits Culver 

Molly Gayley 

Ruth Hapgood 

Robert Hicks 

Ludwig Luft 

Merv Moore 

People of Matadepera 

Roy Raja 



Nancy Redpath 

Henry Rugo 

Kathy Rushby 

William Ryan 

Marina and Wilfried Schmid 

Ellen Sisco 

Irving Telling 

Sheila Williams 



137 



STATISTICS 1994 

General ; 

Number of days open 319 

Fines Collected $7,027.47 

Acquisitions ; 

Books 

Inventory 1993 73,215 

Purchases/Gifts 4,343 

Total Inventory 
Discarded or Lost 
Inventory 1994 

Books on Tape 

Inventory 1993 
Purchases /Gifts 
Total Inventory 
Discarded or Lost 
Inventory 1994 

Records/ Tapes, CD's, and A-V 
Inventory 1993 
Purchases/Gifts 
Total Inventory 
Discarded or Lost 
Inventory 1994 3,904 

Circulation; 

Total Circulation 1993 127,490 

1994 

Adult Circulation 65,851 

Juvenile Circulation 66,056 

Total Circulation 1994 131,907 

Programs: 

Adult Programs 75 

Children's Programs 171 

Non-Library Groups 49 

Total Programs 295 

Attendance : 

Adult 2,130 

Children 3,610 

Non-Library Groups 779 

Total Attendance 6,519 



77 


,558 


-1 


r951 


75 


,607 




321 




257 




578 




^40_ 




538 


3 


,564 




503 


4 


,067 




-163 



138 



CONTRIBUTORS 1994 



Robert and Sylvia Anderson 
Sidney and Arthur Barnes 
Donald William Barron 
Philip and Elizabeth Blanchard 
Phullis and Lawrence Buell 
Charles and Martha Calkins 
Bruce Campbell 
Casale Family 
Alice Conlon 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Alan and Laura Eschenroeder 
Richard and Contance Haggard 
Craig and Heather Hill 
William Huff 



IBM Corporation 

John Langdell 

Helen Lord 

Barbara Marks 

Glover and Gale Mayfield 

Jane Mundt 

Beatrice Page 

Mary Payne 

William T. and Mary H. Payne 

Peg and Al Schmertzler 

Sara and Henry Silveira 

Mark Szepak and Robin Mount 

Orrin Wood, Jr. 

Dept. of Sociology 

University of Missouri, Columbia 



139 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE PARK 

B oard of Trus tee? 

Ruth Scheer, President 
Robert Frank, 1st Vice President 
Laurie Dewey, 2nd Vice President 
John R. White, Treasurer 
Francis S. Moulton, Jr., Clerk 

Joseph Azrack 
Joseph L. Bower 
Robert Brannen 
Jonathan Cohen 
Chester C. d'Autremont 
Susan Fargo 
James Foster 
Gregory Harney 
Heather Hill 
Waleska James 
Gus Kayafas 
Joyce Linde 
Melissa Meyer 
Marcia Morris 
Geoffrey Nunes 
David D. Ogden 
Phyllis Rappaport 
Barbara B. Sisson 
Margaret L. Wengren 



140 



DE CORDOVA MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE PARK 

Museum Staff 

Paul Master-Karnik, Ph.D., Director 
Joan Kennedy/ Assistant to the Director 
David Duddy, Store Manager 

Curatorial 

Rachel Rosenfield Lafo, Senior Curator 
Nicholas Capasso, Associate Curator 
Lynn Herrmann Traub, Registrar 
Bradford Gonyer, Preparator 

Education 

Eleanor Lazarus, Associate Director, Education 

Linda Foster, School Manager 

Jill Brown, Docent Instructor 

Gail Stevens, Administrative Assistant 

Lori Salo, Receptionist 

Development and Administration 

Denise Trapani, Associate Director, Development 

Kathleen Callahan Phelps, Assistant Director for Development 

Susan Omarzu, Development Coordinator 

Susan Atwater, Administrative Assistant 

Susan Diachisin, Membership Director 

Louise Taylor, Membership Assistant 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Clerk 

Michael Sockol, Public Relations Director 

Barbara Barry, Events Coordinator 

Cathy Burns, Function Manager 

Sylvia Passley-Harris, Function Manager 

Barbara Stecher, Research Assistant 

Marc Teatum, Photographer 

Anna Holland, Design Assistant 

Gayle Rich, Concert Manager 

Franco Riello, Accountant 

Linda Anderson-Snow, Reception 

Lise Dalton, Reception 

Jeannette Greenstene, Reception 

Ed Chisholm, Security 

Corporate Program 

Sandra Mongeon, Corporate Program Director 

Ri Anderson, Administrative Assistant 

Buildings and Grounds 

Douglas Holston, Manager 

Bradley Caldbeck, Assistant Manager 



141 



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143 



LINCOLN CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Nancy Bower 

Paul Cook 

Mary Crowe 

Lynn Gargill 

Nancy Garth 

Judy Hall 

Rob Loud 

Stephanie Rolfe 

Lucy Sprayregen 

Barbara Brannen, Co-Chairman 

Margie Topf, Co-Chairman 



The Lincoln Cultural Council receives state funds from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) to benefit the arts, humanities 
and interpretive sciences in the community. The main objectives of 
the MCC are to promote and maintain the vitality of existing cultural 
resources, to insure the continued contribution and value of these 
resources to the Commonwealth, the local communities and their 
residents, and to involve as many citizens as possible in some aspect 
of cultural activity. Allocations of state funds by the MCC are made 
according to the population and the financial need of the community. 
For 1994 Lincoln received $2,000.00 to which was added $631.85 from 
the previous year. 

The following grants were made: 

Yankee Notions . Folk Music Concert $ 350.00 

(Council considered this might be of interest 

to Codman Farm Fall Event - but not necessarily 

so in order to receive our funding) 
Tom Szekely . Video Farming in Lincoln, an oral 

history 450.00 

Margaret Richardson . Vocal Recital 200.00 

Nancy Garth . Lincoln After School Music Program 

Two School Assembly Concerts 300.00 

DeCordova Museum . Art in the Park 150.00 

Suzannah Farny . Viola Concert in Lincoln 200.00 

Jane Benes, Brook's School . Perf. The Tempest 300.00 

Cathleen Neale, Brook's School . Wheelock Theater 

Performance "Ole Sis Goose" 600.00 

Total $2,550.00 

Following the grant cycle, the LCC determined a need to 
replace the piano in Brooks Auditorium and in January 1994 began 
research that led to the decision to do the necessary fund-raising to 
ultimately purchase a new piano for the town. The citizens of 
Lincoln gave generously to the piano fund as did several local 
foundations. There were also performances to benefit the piano 
fund; in May, an afternoon of music was presented by the Moss 
family, and in June a music and dance review provided additional 
funding. 



144 



In September, 1994, a seven foot Steinway grand was purchased, 
and installed in the Brooks Auditorium in October. The first public 
performance is scheduled for January 1995, with Wanda Paik 
performing. The LCC thanks everyone who helped us make the dream of 
a new piano for the Town of Lincoln a reality. 



145 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Kathleen Coleman 

Anne Crosby 

Donna Johnson 

Janet Maloney 

Rick Wiggin 

John Adams, Chairman 

Debra Haiduven, Director 

The summer day camp started more quickly than last year with 
133 campers attending the first session. As usual, things picked up 
in the second sessions with 170 campers attending, while 131 campers 
attended the third session. The total number of campers, 442 
including 8 CITs, was slightly above the number we had the previous 
year, which was 440. The operation of the camp was considerably 
complicated by the school construction, which also created a serious 
problem for the soccer program in the fall, forcing us to relocate 
the soccer field to Pierce Park. 

We sold 238 resident memberships to the Codman Pool and 28 
non-resident memberships, slightly more than last year. The pool has 
a number of maintenance problems, and we plan to retile the baby 
pool, and possibly replace the filter, before next year. The pool is 
now over 20 years old, and it seems likely that it will require 
increased maintenance in the future. 

The number of tennis stickers sold increased, with 231 being 
sold this year, 36 less than in FY93. The number of single 
memberships went down to 76 from 84 the previous year, while the 
number of family memberships decreased to 141 from 162, and the 
number of children's memberships decreased from 21 to 14. The courts 
continue to hold up well, although the older courts tend to crumble 
in dry weather. 

The department offered a number of programs over the year 
ranging from the always popular Sunday River ski trip during the 
February vacation to weekly aerobics, classes in drawing and dance, 
and local walking tours. In total, over 30 different programs were 
offered, targeted at a wide range of age groups and activities. The 
success of these programs is primarily due to the effort of Debra 
Haiduven, our extremely capable Recreation Director, we feel 
extremely fortunate to have her. 



146 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Kathy Madison Feinberg 

Bruce Hoar 

Hema Jairam 

Neil Feinberg, Chairman 

The Committee's primary role is to coordinate all activities for 
Lincoln's world renowned July 4th Celebration, as well as other 
special events, including Patriot's Day and Memorial Day. 

This year's Memorial Day festivities were a special event for the 
many who attended. After a march and firearm salute by Lincoln's 
American Legion Veterans, led by "Red" Bradley, the keynote address 
was given by Lincoln's own Peter Adams. His eloquent and moving 
comments told of his experiences as a Vietnam War veteran. The 
Committee would like to offer our gratitude for Peter's participation. 

This year's July 4th was nothing less than spectacular: sunny, 
warm (but not too hot) and dry. Events commenced with the 4th Annual 
Old-Fashioned Firefighters' Pancake Breakfast, which continues to set 
new records each and every year for number of patrons. The road race 
went off without a hitch with a record number of participants and 
there are many people who got up early to help set up the road race 
and deserve our thanks. Amongst them were Registrars Nancy Ritchie, 
Elaine Carroll and Deb who processed the runners efficiently, 
Richard McMorrow, whose signs kept the runners on course, timers 
Irene Rice, Ingrid Neri, Mike Tryder and Evelyn Keiley, road race 
results runners Susan and Joseph Keiley, Walter Page and his 
computer; John Snelling's cones and Larry Zuelke and his musket for 
starting the race. During the race and the parade, the refreshment 
stand was well-managed by Sarah Ash and Jesse Feinberg. Both Sarah 
Ash and Walter Martin, new town residents, earned purple hearts for 
their efforts from early in the morning to later in the evening at 
the BBQ dinner. 

Children's Parade Marshalls Steven and Terry Perlmutter ably kept 
our youthful bicycle riders from running into each other. Surely, 
the highlight of the main parade was bidding a fond (slightly 
premature) farewell to Police Chief James Arena. Lincoln's town 
committees showed great creativity, as always, in designing their 
floats, which were appreciated by all parade watchers, including our 
fair, impartial and diligent judges Bill and Phyllis Swift, John and 
Judy Ciraso. Connie Smith was the person responsible for assembling 
the large contingent of beautiful antique cars and, as always, he did 
an excellent job. 

Jim Wolff and the Lincoln Soccer Committee organized a family 
oriented soccer game that drew a large group of participants and, 
once again, Betty Smith organized a most successful Tennis Tournament. 



147 



The Codman pool staff worked tirelessly to keep a large number 
of Lincolnites cool in the pool while Bob MacDonald, Brooks School 
Custodian, worked throughout the day (and into the night) to keep the 
grounds clean. Special thanks for the efforts above and beyond the 
call of duty are deserved by Paul Rice and his crew of Boy Scouts who 
worked diligently to collect enough money from a record crowd to pay 
for the very awesome fireworks display. They include Mike Cappucci, 
Jesse Gray, Craig Chapman, David Hicks, Jared Rice, Gus Holcomb, 
Seamus Lennon, Brendon Lennon, Daniel Wolf, Curtis Risley and parents 
Jim Lennon and Bob Wolf. Without their efforts we would never have 
been able to park as many cars as we did, or keep Lincoln Road open 
and traffic moving. 

We look forward to even bigger things for next year and invite 
all Lincolnites who would like to take part to join us. 



148 



MATADEPERA EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 

Mickey Rice 

Betty Smith, Acting Chairman 

The Matadepera Exchange Committee in summer 1994 arranged a 
month-long exchange program for middle school students with our 
sister city in Spain outside Barcelona. Lincoln families hosted ten 
students and a teacher from Matadepera for two weeks starting the end 
of June. Then students from Lincoln visited Matadepera. The aim of 
this exchange is to develop friendships between the two towns and 
give our young people an opportunity to be a part of a cultural 
exchange. We feel that the program now has a firm foundation. 
Dianne Romano teaches Spanish at Brooks School and she accompanied 
the teenagers to Matadepera. 

This Committee explored various ideas for an "exchange" with 
Matadepera. We discussed the concept with the Council on Aging, the 
Lincoln Soccer Program, the music department, and the Foreign Student 
Exchange Program at the high school. Matadepera is genuinely 
interested in having Lincolnites visit Matadepera and anyone 
interested should get in touch with this Committee. There is some 
interest in starting an adult program. 

We thank Suze Craig, whose fluency in Spanish and organizational 
skills made all this happen. We regret that Sue Seeley will be 
leaving the Committee. Her ideas for making an exchange program 
click were most* helpful We are also indebted to her for evaluating 
the program and suggesting improvements. 



149 



BEMIS LECTURE TRUSTEES 

Dan Dimancescu 
Sara Mattes 
Irene Weigel 

In calendar year 1994, the Bemis Free Lecture Series presented 
five programs selected for their diversity of interest and appeal to a 
wide audience range. A major goal of the Trustees in 1994 was to 
encourage participation by various age groups, since it had been noted 
that in prior years, attendance had not represented a wide range of 
town citizens. Believing that the Bemis Free Lecture Series is a 
benefit to all townsfolk, the Trustees sought to widen appeal. This 
decision met with some discussion, as a group of residents questioned 
the inclusion of "family entertainment", given the language in the 
charter that suggests lectures must be "educational". Historically, 
annual Lecture Series have tended to include entertainment events in 
addition to the more "educational" events. The Trustees have been 
very gratified by the turn-out at the Lecture Series (for two events 
there was standing room only) and by the presence of all ages in the 
audience. 

For the Winter Lecture, a Sunday afternoon family event was 
designed to be part of the Winter Carnival. IMAGO, an internationally 
acclaimed mask and mime dance theatre ensemble performed to the 
universal delight of the youngest to oldest of Lincoln's residents. 
This was the most technically ambitious program that Bemis Lectures 
have ever produced. 

In the Spring the Trustees presented a mini-series of two 
programs entitled "Legend and Myth in Contemporary Life". To address 
this theme, Alan Wilson, archeologist/historian from Cardiff, Wales 
spoke in April on "The King Arthur Legend". In May, "Living in 
Exile: A Retelling of the Illiad" was presented — a dramatic 
presentation featuring two actors evoking Homer's passionate 
storytelling with contemporary overtones. An important feature of the 
mini-series was a return of the Bemis Lectures to their original home 
in Bemis Hall. The format was cabaret seating and residents were 
treated to complimentary refreshments. The events were presented on 
Sunday evenings instead of the traditional Friday night schedule. The 
Trustees received abundant positive feedback on these changes. 

Bemis Lecture Series brought wolves to the door on Election 
Night! "Mission: Wolf, Education or Exinction" offered a slide show 
and live wolves to enhance an educational presentation about the 
importance of a viable wolf population in a balanced ecosystem. The 
patience and respectful attention of a standing room only crowd of all 
ages was testimony to our continued fascination with these mysterious 
and beautiful creatures. 

In December, to complement the light-hearted Holiday Season, 
the Trustees presented a program for all ages on a Sunday afternoon 
entitled "Harvard and the Square in Lincoln". This program consisted 



150 



of the Harvard-Radcliffe CALLBACKS, a coed capella singing group, and 
Mike Farneth of the Can Do Show with a juggling, balancing, and 
stand-up comedy pot pourri. 

All Town residents are welcomed and encouraged to submit ideas 
and feedback to any of the Trustees. Much of the programming and/or 
program direction comes from such suggestions. The Trustees will be 
planning the '95-' 96 programs in late spring/early summer and look 
forward to hearing the ideas of fellow residents. 



151 



LINCOLN SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stephen Johnson 

Kharis McLaughlin, METCO Representative 

Barbara Messamore, Hanscom Representative 

Henry Morgan 

Terry Perlmutter 

Patrick Phillips, Vice-Chair 

Robert Roby, Hanscom Representative 

Patti Salem, Chair 

Mark McQuillan, Superintendent 

Nineteen hundred and ninety-four was an exciting and productive 
year for the Lincoln Elementary Schools. It was a year marked by 
important changes - in leadership, campus design, and direction. On 
March 29 Becky van der Bogert tendered her resignation and accepted a 
job as Superintendent of Schools in Winnetka, Illinois. In the 
spring the Committee conducted an exhaustive search for a permanent 
replacement. Fortunately for the schools and the Town, Dr. Mark 
McQuillan, the Committee's unanimous first choice, accepted the 
position. Dr. McQuillan had previously served as the Superintendent 
of Schools in Andover, MA since 1991. He brings a wealth of 
educational and scholarly accomplishments, and proven leadership 
strengths in curriculum development, management and budget building. 
His personal educational philosophy makes him a very good match for 
the type of community we are, and the vision we have crafted for our 
schools. 

Raising the schools' academic standards continues to be the 
School Committee's highest priority. Although this objective is 
sometimes more easily articulated than achieved, we have made 
significant progress. Our mission is to impart to children a strong 
knowledge and skill base, an ability to relate well to others, a 
respect for and appreciation of diversity, and empowerment as 
learners. These are interconnected goals that must be addressed 
collectively, not monolithically or in a linear fashion. The 
accomplishment of this ambitious plan will require creative ways of 
thinking, new approaches to instruction, a strong curriculum and 
ongoing assessment. To that end and to support the work of the 
School Committee, the Central Office, principals, and faculties 
completed several initiatives over the course of the year. These 
ranged from laying the groundwork for a new administrative team to 
addressing curriculum and curriculum development needs. Many of the 
efforts of the School Committee this past year have been targeted at 
two large tasks: the implementation of school construction plans, 
and the selection of a new leadership team for the central office. 

Dr. McQuillan began his tenure in Lincoln by meeting with 
members of the community, School Committee members, faculty, 
administrators and parents. Based in part on these interviews Dr. 
McQuillan developed an "Entry Plan" that describes the strengths and 
areas to improve the system. For the forthcoming year Dr. McQuillan 



152 



devised an action plan that includes assessment and change of middle 
school scheduling, review of the math curriculum for grades 5-8/ 
revision of the curriculum development process, integration of grades 
K-8 into shared facilities, and the development of an after school 
enrichment program. Dr. McQuillan can be commended for his insight, 
fortitude and ability to engage us in an analytical, goal setting 
process . 

In the area of student assessment, alternative approaches have 
been employed in Lincoln for the last several years. Student 
performance is measured by a variety of criteria including portfolios 
and test scores that guide teachers in setting goals for children. 
Recognizing the importance that assessment coupled with strong 
curriculum plays in our long range plan, several public forums and 
breakfast meetings were held this fall to discuss this critical 
issue. The continuing evaluation of a new report card at Hartwell 
School has received wide attention in prominent educational circles. 

It was only a few short years ago that Lincoln trailed most 
other systems in the Commonwealth in the availability and use of 
technology. By the opening of the 1995 school year, Lincoln will be 
on the forefront of technological advances in learning. Both the 
Lincoln and Hanscom campuses are networked. The generosity of the 
Town has made computers available both in the classroom and for the 
administration and staff. Many volunteers (particularly on the 
Hanscom Campus) assisted in this giant leap forward. 

Under the able leadership of Dot Olson and Diane Pelletier the 
Pupil Service Department serves as a model for other school systems. 
As evidenced by happy, secure and flourishing children, the inclusion 
of special needs students in the classroom has proven to be sound 
educational practice. It is also fiscally effective. A film 
documentary "Creating an Inclusive School System" that proudly 
describes Lincoln's special education program was released this 
year. A second integrated preschool classroom was opened this fall 
on the Hanscom Campus. 

The Diversity Roundtable, composed of faculty and 
administrators has continued its important work this year, 
culminating in the publication of a Diversity Plan. Public forums 
were held to discuss the educational and policy implications of the 
plan. Several classroom teachers were recruited to participate in 
the Eastern Massachusetts Initiative's workshops for the prevention 
of racism and discrimination. 

It is clear that our faculty should better mirror our student 
population. Toward that end, the schools are vigorously seeking more 
minority staff. As we review and revise the curriculum it is 
imperative that we keep our diversity goals in mind. An assessment 
of gender bias was initiated this year and several faculty and School 
Committee members will be attending a day long workshop at Wellesley 
College to increase our institutional understanding and awareness of 
this often insidious form of discrimination. 



153 



Long embraced by Lincoln, the METCO program is strong and 
well. Eighty-one children (14% of our student population) have come 
from Boston to join our school community. Under the superb direction 
of Carroll Blake the program flourishes in spite of six years of 
level funding from the State. Our policy mandates that each 
classroom include two children from Boston, with a goal of four as 
space allows. Recognizing the importance of diversity in the 
educational experience and the invaluable contributions made by our 
Boston children, we hope to be able to increase our METCO population 
in the coming school year. 

With the success of our METCO program foremost in our minds and 
wary of an adverse impact on our less affluent neighbors the School 
Committee rejected the School Choice option created in the Education 
Reform Act. 

The sweeping changes introduced by the Reform Act were felt in 
every classroom in 1994. Changes in school financing, curriculum and 
instruction, school governance, and in the guidelines for student 
discipline, were all part of a Reform Act related dialogue about 
educating students in the 21st century. Nineteen hundred and 
ninety-four was as much a year to absorb and implement the new 
legislation, as it was a time to prepare the community for changes in 
school leadership and the physical environment. School Councils 
played an active role in discussing these issues and guiding their 
schools. They discussed issues ranging from pupil teacher ratios, 
staff development, to budgeting. Moneys received by the Town in 1993 
under Education Reform were allocated by the School Committee during 
the 1994-95 school year for math enrichment, a guidance counselor, 
and technology enhancement. 

With the Town's endorsement at last year's Town Meeting, ground 
was broken for the School Building Project in June. The first two 
phases of the construction project have gone swiftly. It is 
anticipated that the project will be completed by October 1995, two 
months ahead of schedule. The project has, on the whole, moved 
speedily, but not without difficult moments, and tragic ones too. On 
October 21, Mr. Alan Courage, of Deerfield, New Hampshire, was killed 
in a construction accident on the site. The loss of Mr. Courage was 
a devastating event for the construction crew, management team, and 
faculty and children who knew him. A memorial service was held for 
the Courage family in the School Committee Room on October 24, and 
flags were flown at half-mast for two weeks. 

Other issues that have arisen in the course of the project 
include: site problems, road safety, technology designs, and the 
grading and shape of the schools' soccer fields. All have been 
satisfactorily resolved through the leadership of the School Building 
Committee, HMFH, and Slotnik & Co. It is anticipated that by April 
of this year certain classrooms and the library will be ready for 
occupancy. 



154 



As noted above, 1994 also saw considerable Committee time 
devoted to the job of securing a new leadership team for the Central 
Office. At the same time that Dr. Rebecca van der Bogert tendered 
her resignation as Superintendent, Ms. Juliana Phillips, Business 
Manager made known her intention to retire, after 13 years of service 
to the schools. Two distinguished search committees consisting of 
faculty, administrators, School Committee members, parents, and 
community members conducted extensive searches to fill these two key 
positions. As a result, Ms. Karen Erickson, Business Manager for the 
schools in Somersworth, New Hampshire, accepted the Business Manager 
position and Dr. Mark McQuillan accepted the offer to be 
Superintendent. While awaiting Dr. McQuillan's arrival in September, 
Mr. Robert Watson was hired to serve as Interim Superintendent from 
July through October. We thank the search committees for their 
fruitful labors. 

There have been several other changes in the administrative 
team. In June, after thirty-five years of service, Ron Hadge, 
principal at Hanscom Middle School retired. We miss Ron's good humor 
and expertise but wish him well in his retirement. We extend a warm 
welcome to Mr. Barry Hopping who was selected by a search committee 
and then appointed by the Superintendent to become the new principal 
at the Hanscom Middle School. Mr. Hopping hails from Ipswich, MA 
where he taught English and coached baseball. After working through 
the summer to help with the transition, Dot Olson, Director of Pupil 
Services, began a six month sabbatical. She has been replaced by 
Diane Pelletier who is the Team Chairperson on the Hanscom Campus. 

In an unsettled statewide labor environment, the Lincoln School 
Committee successfully concluded contract negotiations with the 
custodians, teachers and secretaries. It was accomplished through 
goodwill, hard work, and a shared commitment on all sides to 
achieving positive outcomes. We thank the bargaining teams for their 
many hours of discussions. 

There were changes on the School Committee as well. Agnes 
Wiggin decided not to seek reelection at the end of her first term. 
Thus, in March, the School Committee welcomed Terry Perlmutter to the 
Board. Terry is the mother of two daughters who attend the Hartwell 
School. She and her husband Steve have lived in Lincoln for nine 
years. Terry comes to the position with a background in the Peace 
Corps and many years in human resources management. 

In June, the School Committee regretfully accepted the 
resignation of Leslie Vagliano, after four and a half years of 
service. The School Committee and the Board of Selectmen jointly 
appointed Steve Johnson to fill Leslie's stead until the March 
elections. Steve is a lawyer, writer, and strategic planner. He and 
his wife Paula are the parents of three young children, the oldest of 
whom attends the Hartwell School. 

The Lincoln Schools and Hanscom Air Force Base continue their 
mutually supportive relationship. Although further reductions in 



155 



military spending will necessitate the closing of more military bases 
across the country, we are hopeful that the Department of Defense 
will recognize the unique and important character of Hanscom. As of 
this writing, we remain in a holding pattern until the federal 
government announces base closings in early March. While bidding 
farewell to Col. Neal Mills and Capt. James Coyne as the Hanscom 
Representatives to the School Committee, we welcomed two new members 
this summer, Capt. Robert Roby and Ms. Barbara Messamore. 

Throughout all of this activity, our schools have held together 
admirably under often trying times. This spring in particular, the 
Hartwell School was struck by the tragic suicide of Ms. Janet Dolan 
and later by the passing of Mrs. Paddy Matloff. Nonetheless, due to 
the efforts of an exceptional administrative team, wonderful things 
are happening for children in the Lincoln Public Schools. We are 
indebted to Dr. Mark McQuillan, Superintendent of Schools, Joanne 
McManus, Principal at the Hartwell School, Brenda Brathwaite 
Principal at the Brooks School, Sally Webber Hadge, Principal at the 
Hanscom Primary School, Barry Hopping, Principal at Hanscom Middle 
School, Carroll Blake, METCO Director, Dot Olson, Director of Pupil 
Services, and Karen Erickson, Business Manager. 

A special thank you is extended to the many volunteers who 
unselfishly add to the rich texture and depth of fabric of our 
schools. This includes but is not limited to the PTA and PTO, the 
Boston Parents Group, the METCO Coordinating Committee, the Lincoln 
School Foundation, and the Parent Advisory Council. 

As we start the new year we hope that the important changes and 
self examination that we and our schools have begun in 1994 will 
serve as the springboard that will help us successfully meet the 
challenges of preparing our children for the 21st century. 



156 



CLASS OF 1994 



Emily Corner Adkins 

Shatell Tahsin Alam 

Edwina Ashe 

Caitlin Anne Benson-Allott 

Jonathan K. Bull 

Devon Aaron Burroughs 

Evon Jason Burroughs 

Daniel James Cappucci 

William Peter Carlo 

Vincent Gerardo Champion 

Derrick Cho Wing Chan 

Richard K. Chau 

Raishan Cheek 

Shane C. Clark 

Sally Anne Coleman 

Eric A. G. Davis 

Keith E. Davis 

Wilbur Purrington Deck 

Danielle Renee DeJesus 

Victoria DiDomenico 

Jesse Benjamin Feinberg 

Ryan Helm Foster 

Matthew Emery Gilman 

Alexis Gordon 

Jesse Vail Gray 

Emily Jasen Halpern 



Eric James Heller 

Gus R. Hoi comb 

Christopher Coulson Hubbard 

Tiffany Javai Jordan 

Alexandra Martha Kern 

Moneet Kaur Kohli 

James Patrick Lennon 

Rebecca Ann Low 

Carolyn Vose Marsden 

David Allen Mclnnes 

Ian Madison Mendelson 

Melissa Meyl 

Tarek K. Mroue 

Brian Michael Murphy 

Mary Kymberly Nicholson 

Darlene Nieves 

Christine Louise Petricca 

Daryl Brett Pinto 

Jared Earle Rice 

Melissa Lee Short 

Jaimee Leanne Spainhour 

Lauren Speert 

Suzannah Margaret Stason 

Liv Kathryn Taunton-Rigby 

Adrien Maxx Uretsky 



157 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Mark K. McQuillan 
Karen Erickson 
Dorothy Olson 
Robert Budds 
Carroll Blake 
Joanne McManus 
Brenda Brathwaite 
Sally Hadge 
Barry Hopping 



Superintendent of Schools 

Business Manager 

Director of Pupil Services 

Director of Plant Operations 

METCO Director 

Principal/ Hartwell School 

Principal, Brooks School 

Principal/ Hanscom Primary School 

Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours: The Office of the Superintendent is open Monday through 
Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



158 



OCTOBER 1, 1994 ENROLLMENT 



STUDENTS 



SCHOOL 


GRADE 


SECTIONS 


() = BOSTON 


TOTALS 


Hartwell 


K 

1 
2 
3 
4 


3 
3 
4 
4 

4 

18 


60 ( 6) 
65 ( 8) 
79 (10) 
72 ( 8) 
71 ( 9) 


347 (41) 


Brooks 


5 
6 
7 
8 


3 
3 
3 

3 

12 


53 (11) 
56 (10) 
49 (10) 
53 ( 9) 


211 (40) 




LINCOLN 


CAMPUS TOTAL: 




558 (81) 



Hanscom Primary 



Hanscom Middle 



K 


5 


78 


1 


6 


88 


2 


4 


76 


3 


4 

19 


66 


4 


4 


60 


5 


4 


59 


6 


4 


69 


7 


3 


54 


8 


3 

18 


45 



HANSCOM CAMPUS TOTAL: 



308 



287 
595 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS TOTAL: 



1153 



CASE and outside placements - Lincoln: 5 
(for October 1, 1994) - Hanscom: 3 



159 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPORT 

William Hewins 

Sarah Cannon Holden 

Janet Miller, Vice-Chairman 

Geraldine Nogelo 

Frederick Pryor 

David Wilson, Chairman 

The School Committee worked very hard to continue to keep the 
High School at the top of the Commonwealth's public high schools. 
Setting goals at the beginning of the year, and then meeting these 
goals to better the educational experience of the high school 
student, was top on our agenda. Working with our 
Superintendent/Principal, Matt King, all committee members feel we 
accomplished those goals. 

Again, LS21, our planning effort to explore what subjects and 
experiences each graduating senior will need in the next century, has 
taken much of our time. LS21 has spent countless, freely given hours 
of staff and teacher time in developing proposals that will enable 
L-S to maintain itself as an excellent educational opportunity for 
Lincoln and Sudbury students. The Committee firmly believes that the 
only way to maintain excellence is to strive to improve. After 
several years of exploration and planning LS21 is beginning to bring 
forth proposals. The Physical Education department is increasing its 
emphasis on health and fitness. The Foreign Language department is 
in its second year of total immersion and will be strengthened with 
an interactive language lab. An arts requirement was added to 
graduation requirements. This year we will develop action items 
pertaining to scheduling, outcomes and assessments, civic 
understanding, and advisors. 

The building continues to be well maintained. New roofs were 
installed in those areas not previously redone. The School Council 
developed and codified a disciplinary code. The cafeteria was 
sub-contracted to a private vendor. L-S honored twelve of its past 
leaders with a reception and the unveiling of a Wall of Recognition. 
Jamaica Jammin', the senior safe graduation party, debuted most 
successfully. 

The School Committee continues to feel that community outreach 
has and will be very important. We made an effort to send people 
from the High School to community events on a regular basis. 
Teachers and students alike have spoken at or played music for 
various community groups. Of course, the School Committee welcomes 
the use of the High School facility when available by all members of 
the community. 



160 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 

The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with the 
elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on Monday, March 28, 1994, and 
certifications of the results were received from Nancy J. Zuelke, 
Town Clerk of Lincoln, and Jean M. MacKenzie, Town Clerk of Sudbury, 
as follows: 



For two 3 -year terms: 


Lincoln 


Sudbury 


Total 


William C. Hewins 


254 


1,601 


1,855 


Sarah Cannon Hoi den 


327 


1,543 


1,870 


Blanks 


159 


1,414 


1,573 



Total 740 4,558 5,298 



Respectfully submitted, 



Maryellen Gallagher 
District Clerk 



161 



SUPERINTENDENT - PRINCIPAL'S REPORT 

Dr. Matthew King, Superintendent - Principal 

This past year has seen a number of very important changes at the 
high school. We continue to move ahead with our consideration of the 
various LS 21 proposals. This past year the School Committee 
approved making foreign language a graduation requirement and it 
endorsed another proposal which will shift the focus of the physical 
education requirement to health and fitness courses. As part of our 
commitment to strengthen the teaching of arts within the school we 
introduced several new drama courses. We also introduced a 
journalism course to support our school publications. We continue to 
study and refine other LS 21 proposals, including those on 
scheduling, the arts, civic understanding, advising, and assessment. 
At a time when there is much public discussion about readying our 
students for the next century, we are well on our way towards 
refining our program so we can better prepare our students for the 
future. 

Among our improvement efforts, we are especially pleased with the 
progress we continue to make integrating computers into the school. 
Following the addition of a state-of-the-art computer lab for the 
Mathematics Department two years ago and a lab for the Science 
Department last year, this year we again secured funding from the 
Sudbury Foundation which will enable us to add a technology center 
for the Foreign Language Department. This center will combine 
distance learning, CD ROM, interactive video, video disc tutorials 
and computers to increase the range of resources available to 
students by exposing them to language modeling by native speakers. 
This will give our students unlimited opportunity to speak as well as 
hear the target language. 

This year we have begun implementing the requirements of the 
Education Reform Act. We convened a School Council (made up of four 
parents, three teachers, a community representative, a student and 
myself) which focused most of its energy the first year on reviewing 
and revising the student behavior code. In addition, we have spent a 
great deal of time trying to figure out the many financial 
implications of the Act and its influence on the development of 
curriculum frameworks and assessments. 

Another important change that took place at the high school was 
the hiring of a food service company to manage our cafeteria. By 
"privatizing" this operation we have been able to eliminate the 
expense of running the program and increase the variety and quality 
of what we offer. This is but one example of our on-going effort to 
reduce and control our expenses as we try to maximize the use of our 
funds to support our educational program. 



162 



Life at Lincoln-Sudbury continues to be very full and exciting. 
Throughout the year our students are involved in music, drama, 
athletics, community service and numerous clubs which provide 
important learning experiences for them and make positive 
contributions to the community. In our classrooms students study 
under the tutelage of outstanding faculty who are constantly looking 
for ways to better reach and involve students. We are pleased with 
what we have accomplished this past year and look forward to 1995. 



163 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES--CLASS OF 1994 



Marc Andrew Abelson 
Michael J. Adams 
Sonia Mahwesh Ali 
Elisabeth Vera Andrews 
Katherine Andrews 
Stephanie Jill Atlas* 
Liliana Avila 

Michael Kenneth Bacus 
Mark Vincent Barreras 
Keisha Renee Bates 
Tracey M. Baudanza 
Jodi A. Beagan 
Kim M. Beagan 
Kimberly Anne Bellizzi 
Deborah Lynn Bennett 
Colin J. Bensman* 
Melissa Amy Bergeron 
Kate Berry* 
Sarah A. Binder 
Markell K. Blount 
Tamara Bohsack 
Lindsey I. Bramberg 
Meredith Ryan Brassard 
Judith Lynn Brenner 
Kimberly Buckley 
Megan L. Budds 
Allen Burnett 
Vaughn F. Butler 
Timothy M. Byrd 

Marcia Renee Calandra* 
Nancy L. Campbell 
Andrew Duncan Cannon* 
Elizabeth Jean Carlton*# 
Renee Marie Casella 
Craig W. Champion, III* 
Linus Yi-shouh Chen* 
Bethany Claff 
Kimberley S. Clapp 
David T. Clarke 
Onika Keita Clarke 
Rachel Anne Cohen*# 
Jason Edward Cole 
Landis M. Collins 
Stacey Ellen Connoy 
Peter Edward Consales 
John Crane 
Stephen J. Cryan 



Jeffrey Robert D'Antonio 
Shannon M. Daly 
Michael John Dansereau 
Stefanie Faith Davidson*# 
Catherine Alice Dawson 
Joshua Keith Decker 
Joseph A. DelGuidice 
Dylan S. DePeter 
Tara Lynn DiPace 
Heather Doppelt 
Emily Elizabeth Dorsey 

Christopher Eriksen 

Jo Anna Marie Fabrizio 
Meghan Fallon 
Dana E. Feder 
Lorraine R. Feinberg 
Robert Fell 
Myles D. Felsing 
Vincent Ferrera 
Patrizia Fiscale 
Mark A. Florence 
Ervin Donald Flowers 
Kevin Foley 
Cassandra L. Foster 
Orly S. Frank 
Eric J. Fraser 

Karen Gadarian 
Christine Noel Garrity 
Amy Gaumnitz 
Courtney Ann Gavin 
Melissa Ann George 
Marnie R. Given# 
Andrea Beth Glassman 
liana Gordon *# 
Jonathan H. Grant 
Peggy Greenstein* 
Shawn Gross 

John Stephen Hales 
Tyson Kenneth Hall 
Marshall A. Hall 
Jennifer Alexa Hamar 
Isaac Atu Coleman Hampton 
Michael Robert Harney 
Katherine Marie Hartigan 
Guy Estabrooke Heald IV 



164 



Jason W. Hebb 
Jessica Lyn Helgeson# 
Kristen April Hoar 
Amy Lynn Hoffman* 
Theresa Huang* # 
Alisa Renee Hunter 



Joshua D. Natanson 
Benjamin F. Neivert 
Duncan Tyler Newell 
Christian A. Newton 
Michael J. Nogelo 
Nathalie Nopakun 



Scott D. Ireland 

Christopher M. Jewett 
Sarah Christine Johnson* 
Ryan Christopher Jones 
Tiffany Jennifer Jost* 
Ashlee J. Juneau 

Heather Emily Kamins 
Robert C. Kaplan 
Adam Lewis Karol 
Mary Elizabeth Kenda 
David Marc Kline 
Timothy Knauer 
Matthew Algere Knox 
Kris Koenig 

Yamini Elizabeth Koshy* 
Lauren Elizabeth Kreisel 
Lev Yakov Kushner 

Eric P. Lally 
Marc A. Laurendeau 
Elizabeth Anne Lee* 
Julia H. Lindenberg*# 
Paul E. Lirette, Jr. 

Brian K. Maher 

Brian Robert Patrick Mahoney 

Maegan Ann Maloney 

Michael John Manning 

Kimberly Anne Manuel 

Danielle Elena Marcus 

Leslie S. Marotz 

Elizabeth Carroll Mawn* 

Meghan O'Gara McCarthy* 

Maryellen McEleney 

Ayanna Zakia McFarlane 

Laura C. Meier 

Tammy A Mikula 

Neil G. Miller 

Martin Moody 

Arash R. Moradi 

Ann W. Moss 

Aidan Murphy 

Kerry L. Murphy 



Keri A. O'Brien 
Kevin Robert O'Brien 
James Edmund O'Malley 
David E. Offner# 
Paula Jean Ogar 
Julie K. Onigman 
Jami M. Orris 
Cynthia J. Osterling*# 

Rachel A. Panetta 
Jeffrey S. Parrish 
Parul Patel 
Andrew Scott Perlman 
Douglas A. Petersen 
Christopher Phelps 
Amanda J. Piece 
Joshua Thomas Plati 
Amy Jean Porter 
Amy M. Prendergast 
Jill S. Pulver 
Cory Elizabeth Pustaver 

Carrie Ann Rawson 
Marci A. Reichbach*# 
Meredith Hillary Rhodes 
Dana Neil Rock 
Christopher F. Roller 
Samantha Anne Rose 
Katherine Ann Rossini 
Suzanne Elizabeth Rotz* 

Amy Lynn Schoeny 
Marc J. Schubmehl 
Eric T. Schwamb 
Ashley D. Scofield 
Jeffrey Senecal 
Danielle M. Shallah 
Ki Ariann Shaw 
Jennifer H. Shedd 
Benjamin Robert Sherman 
James Michael Simpkins, Jr 
Joshua Adam Slone 
Stephen Smith 
Garrett E. Sokoloff 
Janet E. Spittler 



165 



William George Stanton, III 
Gregory Carr Stolle 
Michael A. Sweeney 
Davida Michelle Sweeney 
Katharine Anne Sykes 

Canio Giovanni Tartaglia 
Joshua A. Tatelman 
Jason E. Taunton-Rigby 
Christopher M. Terrio 
Stephen Alexander Thoman 
Melissa Lauren Tischler*# 
Stephen G. Tsou 
Danielle Jeanine Tucker 
Nathan K. Turner 

Mark E. Verville 
Jonathan Paul Vizzini 

Erik W. Waardenburg 
Aason M. Walsh 
Carrie Ann Weigner 
Brodie Welch*# 
Kevin Connelly Wells 
Terence H. Welsh 
David H. Wharton 
Courtney Whipple 
Alison Jill Wiadro 
Stephanie Allegra Wiley 
Matthew Ryan Williams 
Jay M. Williamson 
Rachel Laurie Winer*# 
Willie Thomas Winston, Jr. 
Adrian Russell Winter 
Corrie Wood 
David Patrick Wren 
Karen Elizabeth Wright* 

*Cum Laude 
#Honors in History 

STUDENT EXCHANGE Ana Maria Larrea 
Juan Pablo Perez 
Ayako Nishine 



166 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1994 



1990 



TOTAL 



931 



1991 



888 



1992 



901 



1993 



1994 



Lincoln 


98 


93 


99 


102 


109 


Sudbury 


749 


710 


710 


704 


691 


METCO 


75 


68 


73 


71 


68 


Other (Tuition) 


9 


17 


19 


18 


19 



895 



887 



Boys 
Girls 



458 
473 



437 
451 



430 
471 



427 
468 



434 
453 



TOTAL 



931 



888 



901 



895 



887 



9th Grade 


224 


10th Grade 


218 


11th Grade 


237 


12th Grade 


252 


TOTAL 


931 


Tuition Pupils 




Attending 




Other Schools 


30 



212 
231 
220 
225 



888 



28 



230 


227 


226 


217 


228 


234 


235 


226 


226 


219 


214 


201 



901 



23 



895 



18 



887 



24 



167 





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168 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Treasurer's Report 

July 1, 1993 thru June 30, 1994 



Pauline M. Paste, Business Manager/Treasurer 
Total Cash Balance, July 1, 1993 



$ 2,397,707.98 



District Fund 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1993 

Receipts : 
Operating Accounts 

Sudbury Assessment 

Lincoln Assessment 
Total Assessments 

Chapter 70 

Transportation Aid 
Total State Aid 

Anticipated Receipts 

Miscellaneous Income 

Petty Cash Refund 

Tailings 

Total Sundry Income 
Total Operating Receipts 

Bond Issue 
Total Bond Issue 

Deduction Accounts : 

Federal Withholding Tax 

Massachusetts Withholding Tax 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 

Health Insurance 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 

Middlesex County Retirement 

Disability Insurance 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 

L-S Teachers' Association 

PEBSCO 

United Way 



Total Deduction Receipts 

Total District Fund Receipts 

TOTAL DISTRICT FUND INCOME 



$ 2,028,641.72 



$ 6,942,561.92 
991,208.17 



1,279,627.00 
175,000.00 



190,261.46 

72,134.32 

1,000.00 

0.00 



2,080,000.00 



852,016.23 
350,706.32 

36,696.01 
156,430.06 
320,101.61 
114,301.47 

30,987.75 
293,044.28 
405,522.45 

31,018.01 

9,400.41 

702.00 



7,933,770.09 

1,454,627.00 
190,261.46 



$ 73,134.32 
$ 9,651,792.87 



2,080,000.00 



$ 2,600,926.60 
$ 14,332,719.47 
$ 16,361,361.19 



169 



DISBURSEMENTS ; 



Operating Accounts 
Operating Budget 
Equipment Budget 
Capital Projects 
Debt Service - principal 

- interest 
School Choice Assessment 

Total Budget Disbursements 

FY ' 94 Encumbrances 

Petty Cash Advance 

Excess & Deficiency Fund 



$ 9 



221,278.62 

95,102.07 

0.00 

150,000.00 
38,632.59 

6,621.00 



55,812.00 

1,000.00 

0.00 



Capital Project (Boilers, et al) 2,564,036.21 

Deduction Accounts : 

Federal Withholding Tax 852,016.23 

Massachusetts Witholding Tax 350,706.32 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 36,696.01 

Health Insurance 155,916.80 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 320,101.61 

Middlesex County Retirement 114,301.47 

Disability Insurance 30,135.28 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 293,044.28 

Credit Union 405,522.45 

L-S Teachers' Association 31,025.21 

PEBSCO 9,400.41 

United Way 702.00 

Total Deduction Disbursements 

Total District Fund Disbursements 



$ 9,511,634.28 

55,812.00 

1,000.00 

0.00 

2,564,036.21 



2,599,568.07 
14,732,050.56 



Cash Balance District Fund June 30, 1994 1,629,310.63 

Cash Balance Revolving Accounts on June 30, 1994 353,370.41 

Total Cash Balance June 30, 1994 $1,982,681.04 



170 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Balance Sheet 

June 30, 1994 

ASSETS 



Bank of Boston 1 
Bank of Boston 2 
Baybank 1 
Baybank 2 
MMDT 

Boston Safe 
Boston Safe 

TOTAL ASSETS 



$ 254,582.85 
(29,524.98) 

8,974.48 

378,263.02 

1,202,358.08 

23,038.50 

144,989.09 

$1,982,681.04 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Surplus Revenue (Reserved for Assessments) 

Excess & Deficiency 

FY94 Encumbrances 

FY94 Ed Reform Carry-Over 

Tailings 

Health Insurance 

Disability Insurance 

Teachers ' Dues 

Adult Education 

Athletics 

Booster Club 

Building Use 

Cafeteria 

Capital Project 

Capital Outlay 

Computer Contract 

Damage to School Property 

Donations 

GAAD Grant FY94 

Library Copy Machine 

Lost Books 

Medical Claims Trust Fund 

Nursery School 

Tuition 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



634,484.07 

380,687.52 

69,816.00 

130,064.00 

700.78 

26,366.52 

8,335.92 

(7.20) 

7,301.24 

13,362.12 

8,038.50 

37,884.24 

(2,099.84) 

378,863.02 

916.98 

15,133.25 

(340.21) 

22,579.96 

858.37 

2,709.85 

13,203.31 

145,352.89 

2,887.49 

85,582.26 

$1,982,681.04 



171 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 

School Bonds 

(Final Payment 08/15/03, 3.77% interest) 2,080,000.00 

TOTAL DEBT $2,080,000.00 



EXCESS & DEFICIENCY FUND 

Cash Balance July 1, 1993 $ 279,289.42 

Approved Transfer 101,398.10 

Disbursements 0.00 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1994 $ 380,687.52 



$ 


0.00 
0.00 


$ 


0.00 



STABILIZATION FUND 

Voted establishment - Spring Town Meeting 1992 
FY93 Funding 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1994 



MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 

Interest Income $59,696.17 

Telephone 195.73 

Miscellaneous Refunds 10,673.42 

FY93 Sundry 1,569.00 

$ 72,134.32 



ANTICIPATED RECEIPTS 

Athletic User Fees $ 95,205.00 

Athletic Gate Receipts 9,200.00 

Building Rental 70,856.46 

Athletic Booster Account 15,000.00 

$190,261.46 



172 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Jim Birmingham 
Mikki Lipsey 
Linda Pejchar 

The Lincoln Scholarship Committee exists to assist all Lincoln 
residents, regardless of secondary school attending, with their 
higher education costs. Applications from high school seniors are 
accepted through the beginning of April. The trustees meet with the 
new graduates in June to see how and if the Committee can help the 
students fill in the gaps in their financial aid packages for the 
coming year. 

This year thanks to the generosity of the community, a matching 
grant from the Ogden Codman Trust, and the income from the town 
administered scholarship trust fund, we were able to award a total of 
$14,000 in aid to four very deserving students. 

Based on applications and essays sent to the Committee, special 
awards were made in June to three Lincoln students. Neil Miller 
received the Sumner Smith Community Service Award. Craig Champion 
and Marcia Calandra were both given the Fannie S. Campbell Academic 
Award . 

The Committee misses Mary Spindler, who has given many years to 
the Scholarship Committee, and thanks her greatly for all her work. 
We also wish to thank Terry Perlmutter, who served us all too briefly 
before taking on the greater challenge of the Lincoln School 
Commmittee. The Committee welcomes our two new appointees, Jim 
Birmingham (Moderator appointee) and Linda Pejchar (School Committee 
appointee) . 

We hope the Town will continue to support the Lincoln 
Scholarship Fund. The students we are fortunate to speak with have 
all been outstanding. They should make this town proud. We, and 
they, thank you all. 



173 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 

OFFICERS 

Patrick J. Mullen, Jr., President 
Emil J. Ragones, Treasurer 
Annalisa Notaro, Secretary 

DIRECTORS 

Sherry Dakss 
Janet Miller 
Marc Onigman 
Giselle Sampson 
Rita Zarella 

MEMBERS 

Eileen Berkel 
Thomas Danco 
Maureen Dolan 
Ann Kramer 
Alice Levine 
Eileen McEleny 

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES 

Meridth Mattison 
Dave Wright 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund, through the generous 
contributions of the citizens and businesses of Lincoln and Sudbury, 
and the faculty and staff of Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, in 
1994, increased the endowment to $807,193. This increase is a direct 
result of the phonathon and mail campaign held in November which 
raised $45,010 which is moving the capital campaign towards its goal 
of a $1,000,000 endowment. 

In FY94 the Sudbury Foundation matched the first $1,000 of 
each personal gift. Additional direct scholarship money, $7,500 was 
raised by Springthing which is held the second Saturday in May. The 
success of Springthing is directly attributed to the large group of 
friends who so generously donate their time and talents. 

Scholarships are funded by the net earnings of the endowment 
and the direct proceeds of Springthing. Additional scholarships are 
solicited from businesses. 

A faculty committee selects the recipients based on criteria 
of need, academic achievement and community involvement. The fund is 
available to Lincoln-Sudbury senior class members with definite 
college plans and financial need. 



174 



The recipients of the 1994 scholarship awards were: 
Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarships 



Craig Champion 
Yamini Koshy 
Aidan Murphy 
Meredith Rhodes 
Aaron Walsh 



Patricia Fiscale 
Brian Mahoney 
Amanda Piece 
James Simpkins 



Named Scholarship Awards 

Bramwell B. Arnold Physics Award 

Circuit City Scholarship 

Malcolm L. & Eleanor L. Donaldson 

Scholarship 
High Tech Council Classic Road Race 

Scholarship 
Frank Hayes Memorial Scholarship 
John R. Kirshner Memorial History 

Scholarship 
Virginia K. Kirshner Memorial Scholarship 
Massport Scholarship 

Edward J. McCarthy Memorial Scholarship 
Ninety-Nine Restaurant Scholarship 
Frank Pirrello Sr. Memorial Scholarship 
Ambika Ramachandra Foundation Scholarship 
Raytheon Company Scholarship 
Lily T. Spooner Memorial Scholarship 
Sterling Bank Scholarship 
Sudbury Foundation Scholarship 
Robert Wentworth Music Award Scholarship 
John K. Wirzburger Memorial Scholarship 



Linus Chen 
Allen Burnett 
Meghan McCarthy 

Dana Rock 

Tiffany Jost 
Brodie Welch 

Michael Dansereau 
Kristen Hoar 
Karen Gadarian 
Kris Koenig 
Megan Budds 
Ashley Scofield 
Parul Patel 
Marcia Calandra 
Alison Wiadro 
Rachel Winer 
Mamie Given 
Dylan DePeter 



175 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 
STATEMENT OF REVENUE, EXPENDITURES AND FUND BALANCE 



Revenue Years Ended 6/30 

Revenue ; 

Matching Funds Rec'd 
Contributions 
Investment Income 
Springthing 
Total Revenue 



1994 



$ 51,022 

53,800 

32,509 

7,500 

$144,831 



Expenditures ; 

Total Scholarships Awarded $ 35,400 

Operating Expense 19,141 

Provision for Uncollectable 

Pledges 1,885 

Total Expenditures $ 54,426 

Excess of revenue and support 
over expenses before net gain 
(losses) on securities $ 88,405 

Net gains (losses) on 

securities ( $ 8,012 ) 

Excess for year $ 80,393 

Fund Balance Ending $807,193 



1993 



$ 53,208 

52,994 

31,175 

7,500 

$144,877 



$ 33,500 
15,462 

26,000 
$ 74,962 



$ 69,915 

( $ 8,566) 
$ 61,349 
$726,800 



1192 



$ 54,038 

45,980 

39,915 

7,000 

$146,933 



$ 32,000 
8,508 



$ 40,508 

$106,425 

( $ 1,524) 
$104,901 
$665,451 



For information concerning the Lincoln-Sudbury Scholarship Fund, 
Inc., call the Regional High School at 443-9961 or Pat Mullen at 
443-3168. 



176 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 









Term 








Expires 


Acton 


Robert Wiltse 




1997 


Arlington 


John P. Donahue 




1997 


Belmont 


Herbert M. Yood 




1995 


Bolton 


Anita M. Ware 




1996 


Boxbo rough 


Kenneth Whitcomb 




1997 


Carlisle 


William Churchill, Vice- 


-Chairperson 


1997 


Concord 


Lawrence D. Lor ah 




1995 


Dover 


Nancy Dowd 




1996 


Lancaster 


Fred A. Reed 




1997 


Lexington 


Nyles N. Barnert, Chairperson 


1996 


Lincoln 


Harold A. Levey, Jr. 




1995 


Needham 


Kenneth D. Mullen, Jr. 




1995 


Stow 


Frances Hyden 




1996 


Sudbury 


Glenn L. Noland 




1995 


Way land 


Elaine Sweeney 




1996 


Weston 


Joseph J. Gazzola 




1996 



During the 1994-95 school year, Minuteman celebrates its 20th 
anniversary. New programs have been opened in Environmental 
Technology, Dental Assisting and Importing/Exporting, and the school 
has a new name. By a vote of the School Committee, we are now 
Minuteman Science-Technology High School and Adult Career Center. 
This name reflects the emphasis which Minuteman places on technical 
literacy for all of its students to equip them for success in today's 
workplace. 

For several years, Minuteman staff members and college/business 
partners have been implementing new school programs on the basis of 
three facts: 



1. Technical literacy is 
every career field. 



a basic skill now needed in nearly 



2. Many outstanding new career opportunities are emerging in 
fields related to science and technology (biotechnology, 
environmental technology, electromechanics, energy-saving 
construction, computer-controlled vehicles, etc). 

3. Successful careers must now be based on continuous learning 
and improvement. 

These facts have led Minuteman to begin technical literacy 
programs on the middle school level, to require all students to take 
a minimum of three years of science and learn total quality 
management procedures (TQM), and to integrate technical and academic 
learning in a way that helps many students to achieve much higher 
levels of academic proficiency. The school has also established 
school-business-college partnerships that are now recognized as among 
the best in the nation. 



177 



Dr. Rollin Johnson of Harvard University and Project Director 
for the Education Task Force of the Carnegie Commission on Science, 
Technology and Government has headed a Study Commission that has 
produced a strategic blueprint for the future that Minuteman 
Science-Technology High School is now pursuing. With the help of 
business and industry partners, Minuteman is seeking state and 
federal as well as private corporation assistance for its role as a 
science center for age-unlimited learning. 

Through its daytime, afternoon, evening and summer classes and 
its satellite technical literacy programs for middle school students, 
our school is dedicated to providing young people and adults with the 
skills for success in the college classrooms and careers of tomorrow. 

One of the most promising careers of tomorrow is biotechnology, 
and Minuteman will be opening a Biotechnology Career Academy for 
students in grades 10 through 12 under a grant award just announced 
by the National Science Foundation. The project is a collaborative 
effort designed to serve as a national model, giving students a 
coordinated learning spectrum from Minuteman to Middlesex Community 
College to Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

The Biotechnology Career Academy will operate as a school-within 
a-school at Minuteman with academic and technical teachers working 
together in teams. Instructors in the traditional academic areas of 
English, chemistry, biology, mathematics and other disciplines will 
be linked with technical teachers and will no longer teach in an 
autonomous fashion, but will be participating members of professional 
teams, with all instructors teaching the same group of students. 

Students will work on common projects that explore both academic 
and technical learning during common time. This broad-based approach 
to education will allow students to become familiar with multiple 
career paths within the biotechnology industry and to receive solid 
preparation for continuing their education at the post-secondary 
level. 

Scheduled to open in September, 1995, the Biotechnology Career 
Academy's program and curriculum will be developed jointly by 
Minuteman, Middlesex Community College and Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute and disseminated by the National Science Foundation as a 
national model. Admission to the new academy will be highly 
selective, based on testing, interviews and recommendations. 

Another National Science Foundation grant--a 4-year grant of 
$355,000 — will establish a "Math/Science Enhanced Manufacturing 
Technology Training Program" for females and minorities. The project 
is designed to address the declining achievement level of female and 
minority students in math and science as they progress through the 
educational system. 

The project will train up to 30 female and minority middle and 
high school teachers to become leaders in their schools, showing 



178 



them how to provide high interest manufacturing technology based 
hands-on activities to support and enhance challenging math and 
science instruction which can easily be incorporated into the 
participants' school curricula. These teachers are also expected to 
serve as role models/ helping female and minority students indentify 
and combat barriers which would prevent them from taking math and 
science courses and preparing for careers in math and science. 

The new program is an outgrowth of another National Science 
Foundation funded project at Minuteman — the "Math/Science Enhanced 
Manufacturing Project". During the past 3 1/2 years this project has 
linked traditional academic education in math and science with 
hands-on experiences in high technology manufacturing at Minuteman, 
combined with outreach to area middle schools. 

Through the NSF project/ Minuteman established a partnership 
with Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory/ 
Harvard University, Digital Equipment Corporation/ Raytheon 
Corporation/ Polaroid Corporation/ Vermont Circuits/ Inc., Middlesex 
Community College and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, 
which made possible the construction of a pilot manufacturing 
laboratory for Minuteman students. During the past 3 years this lab 
has also been used for NSF funded summer institutes which gave 120 
middle and high school students and 24 teachers from Minuteman 
district towns an opportunity to work together designing, building, 
testing and troubleshooting small programmable robots. Another 
outcome of this project has been the establishment of Math/Science 
Integrated Technology Laboratories in Lexington, Concord, Acton and 
Lancaster middle schools, staffed by Minuteman science teachers and 
serving students from these towns as well as Belmont, Bolton, Stow, 
Sudbury, Lincoln and Carlisle. 

During 1994, Minuteman students and staff continued to earn 
honors for the excellence of their skills. At the national Student 
Robotics Automation Contest sponsored by the Society of Manufacturing 
Engineers at Purdue University, freshman Courtney Eckhardt of 
Arlington and sophomore Hilary Prezblynski of Sudbury won the Robot 
Maze contest, junior Michael Ehman of Belmont won the Pick and Place 
competition with his Scorbot robot, and junior Steve Taliadouros of 
Dracut was third in the Robot Maze Open competition. 

At the national Vocational Industrial Clubs of America Skill 
Olympics, Eric Anderson of Arlington became the third Minuteman 
student to win the national championship in Collision Repair 
Technology. Other national winners from Minuteman were Wayne 
Hederstedt of Fitchburg, second place in the post-graduate Air 
Conditioning & Refrigeration competition and Julie D'Agostino of 
Wellesley, certificate of merit in the Nursing Assistant 
competition. For the ninth year in a row, Minuteman horticulture 
students won top honors for their exhibit at the New England Flower 
Show. 



179 



In athletics, a total of 25 Minuteman students were named to 
Commonwealth and Colonial Conference all star teams in football, 
soccer, swimming, wrestling, hockey, baseball, basketball and 
Softball. 

Minuteman 's Director of Special Needs Gerald Less received a 
special leadership and service award from the state association of 
vocational special needs personnel (M. A.V.E. S.N.P. ) • Minuteman 
Science instructor Dr. David Form received a national Access 
Excellence Award, given to outstanding Biology teachers by Gentech 
Corporation. Dr. Form is the current President of the Massachusetts 
Association of Biology Teachers. 

Minuteman Academics and Technology coordinator James Amara has 
been appointed to a state Math/Science Advisory Council which will 
review the state's mathematic and science curriculum frameworks. 
Minuteman Electromechanical Technology instructor Theresa Jay was 
invited to spend a week in Erlagen, Germany as a guest research 
scientist in the area of refractive micro lenses. Minuteman 
technology students benefit from her expertise in the laser 
technology program which she teaches. 

Minuteman Graphics Department Head Michael Ciccarelli is a 
member of the Board of Directos of the Boston Litho Club. Computer 
Technology instructor Patrick Meredith is currently Administrative 
Vice-President of the Merrimack Chapter of Toastmasters 
International. English/Communications Department Head David Reid is 
a cited reviewer in the current D.C. Heath grammar and composition 
textbook series. 

In this, our twentieth year, we are proud of the accomplishments 
of our staff and students and of the positive impact Minuteman 
Science-Technology High School and Adult Career Center is having on 
the lives of our students and on the economy of our state. 



180 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1994 



TOWN 



98 



97 



96. 



95 



PG 



TOTAL 



Acton 


2 


2 


9 


11 


13 


37 


Arlington 


35 


35 


28 


30 


24 


152 


Belmont 


7 


6 


11 


6 


8 


38 


Bolton 


2 





1 





2 


5 


Boxbo rough 


3 


1 


4 


2 


2 


12 


Carlisle 


1 


1 





3 


2 


7 


Concord 


7 


11 


3 


2 


7 


30 


Dover 








1 





1 


2 


Lancaster 


2 


6 


1 


8 


1 


18 


Lexington 


4 


6 


8 


9 


17 


44 


Lincoln 


2 


2 











4 


Needham 


13 


6 


8 


3 


5 


35 


Stow 


8 


10 


3 


1 


5 


27 


Sudbury 


4 


'6 


4 


4 


7 


25 


Way land 


1 


1 


3 


3 





8 


Weston 








1 





2 


3 


Tuition 


122 


_97 


77 


46 


43 


385 



TOTAL 



213 



190 



162 



128 



139 



832 



CLASS OF 1994 
MINUTEMAN TECH 



There were no Lincoln graduates in FY 1994 



181 



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183 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

VITAL STATISTICS 

48 Births, 41 marriages and 25 deaths have been recorded during the 
year 1994 as follows: 

BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



1993 

Oct. 6 

Oct. 21 

Oct. 21 



Jackson Paul Charrette 
Daniel Oliver Kraft 
Alexia G. Stamatopoulos 



Edmond III. & Ann Charrette 
Alfred Kraft & Madalon Meany 
George & Alexandra 
Stamatopoulos 



1994 



Jan. 


1 


Jan. 


21 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


6 


Feb. 


7 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


22 


Mar. 


3 


Mar. 


8 


Mar. 


9 


Apr. 


3 


Apr. 


7 


Apr. 


8 


Apr. 


23 


May 


19 


May 


26 


May 


28 


June 


8 


June 


20 


June 


22 


June 


24 


June 


27 


June 


30 


Aug. 


16 


Aug. 


17 


Aug. 


23 


Sept, 


, 13 


Sept, 


. 17 


Sept, 


. 25 


Sept, 


. 6 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


6 



Jamison Charles Billings 
Lance Matthew Grieman 
Megan Louise MacLean 
Megan Elizabeth Lord 
Daniel Anthony Von Staats 
Anna Pierce Williams 
Parker Severinson Mundt 
Jason Nathaniel Yanowitz 
Owen Thomas Nugent 
Caroline Anne Hopland 
Faith White Lobelson 
Nichole Angelina Leger 
Scott MacRae Broadbent 

Alexa Rose Vercollone 
Eleanor Catherine Jahrling 
Brian Arthur Eckhardt 

Lucy Catherine Kania 
Samuel Gus Beck 
Brian James Sullivan 
Corey Doyle Stock 
Ryan Douglas Fleming 
Glenn Anthony Matot 
Mitchell Alan McGinty 
Alyssa Cristine Kalams 
Edward Lionel Nardi 
Aaron Leonard Sliski 
Noah Jeffrey H. Whinston 
Kristina Natalia Ohl 
Sarah Locke Stoll 
Evan Stolow Sobkowicz 
Jeremy Buttolph Robson 
Robert Martin Danziger 
Steven Robert Ingard 



Thomas & Despena Billings 

Eric & Brenda Grieman 

Brian & Mary MacLean 

Michael & Mary Lord 

Aaron & Teresa Von Staats 

Benjamin & Elizabeth Williams 

Kevin & Jayne Mundt 

Joel Yanowitz & Amy Metzenbaum 

James & Sheila Nugent 

Jan & Barbara Hopland 

Jeffrey & Anne Lobelson 

David & Gina Leger 

Ericson Broadbent & Susan 

MacRae 
Carl & Joanne Vercollone 
Robert & Catherine Jahrling 
William Eckhardt & Carolyn 

Kinney 
John & Holly Kania 
Kenneth Beck & Wendy Gus 
James & Annamarie Sullivan 
James Stock & Anne Doyle 
James & Nancy Fleming 
Glenn & Gail Matot 
Robert & Kerry McGinty 
Spyros Kalams & Lisa Mendes 
Edward & Jean Nardi 
Alan Sliski & Susan Katz-Sliski 
Michael Whinston & Bonnie Honig 
John & Katrina Ohl 
Andrew Stoll & Carol Locke 
Mark Sobkowicz & Michelle Stolow 
Edwin & Ann Robson 
Michael & Elizabeth Danziger 
Sven & Susan Ingard 



18- 



Date 


of 


Birth 


Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


23 


Oct. 


27 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


15 



Name of Child Names of Parents 

Henry Corbett Cousins Daniel & Sarah Cousins 

Philip Tae Kyoon Lee Wook Lee & Helen Kwon-Lee 

Samuel Haywood Dubin Steven Dubin & Merrie Leighton 

Nathaniel Charles Hitchcock Michael & Nancy Hitchcock 

Melissa Jacqueline Goodman Bruce Goodman & Linda Shaw 

Kimberley Jayne Heller Thomas & Ann Heller 

Willis Lawrence Ashley Christopher & Christina Ashley 

Annie Jackson Hawkes Gregory & Elaine Hawkes 

Edward Daniel O'Brien Michael & Jane O'Brien 

Michael David O'Brien Michael & Jane O'Brien 

Ezekiel Solomon Desantis Joseph Desantis & Sheryl 

Solomon 

Dec. 2 Lucas Allsopp Hickok Jonathan & Debra Hickok 



185 



MARRIAGES 



Date 


of 


Marr i 


age 


1994 




Feb. 


14 


Mar. 


5 


Apr. 


30 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


22 


May 


27 


May 


28 


May 


29 


May 


29 


June 


5 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


12 


June 


18 


June 


18 


June 


25 


June 


26 


July 


2 


July 


5 


July 


15 


July 


16 



Names 



Residence 



Mark Ellis Jozwicki 

Gloria S. Sanchez-Hernandez 

Malcolm Lawrence Gefter 

Katherine Rossi Kirk 

James Calvert Watson 

Deborah Lee Speer 

Christopher Foster 

Hilary French 

Alexander Zenopoulos 

Odile Marie Cazenave 

Raymond Kevin Haarstick 

Marie Esther Andreottola 

John Thomas O'Connor 

Patrice Ann Peterson 

Stephen E. Braude 

Leigh H. Bonilla 

Richard Mark Lagiewski 

Clare Ann Ellison 

Emre Toker 

Mary Ann Greaves 

Bruce Duff Campbell 

Tina Ann Grotzer 

Paul Bryan D'Oliveira 

Marie Ann Boynton 

Beau Barry Ryan 

Susan Elizabeth O'Rourke 

Jessie W. Tucker 

Heidi Pearl 

Frederick William Sheldon 

Lisa A. Budd 

John Seymour Kerr, II 

Jennifer Goodwin Wolcott 

Abbie Bourgan 

Susan Elizabeth Kindlund 

Paulo Cabral Loura 

Norma Mercedes Chacon 

Bruce Gerald Goodman 

Linda Susan Shaw 

Victor Simon Brodney 

Stephanie Denise Holland 

David Bentley Rice 

Lavinia Jeryl Seide 

Francisco Jules Thebaud 

Beth Fortier Harrison 

Jonathan Miles Dwyer 

Carolyn Bradley Caswell 



Lincoln, 


MA 


Santa Fe 


deBogata, DC 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Federal 1 


rtay, WA 


Federal 1 


tfay, WA 


Way land, 


MA 


Way land, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Knoxvill 


B, TN 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Rocheste 


r, NY 


Burlingt 


on, VT 


Tucson, 


AZ 


Waltham, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


New York 


, NY 


New York 


/ NY 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Orleans, 


MA 


Nashua, 


NH 


Nashua, 


NH 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Providence RI 


Concord, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Maynard, 


MA 


Maynard, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


Ma 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Lincoln, 


MA 


Charlestown, MA 


Charlestown, MA 



186 



Date 


of 


Marriacre 


July 


25 


Aug. 


13 


Aug. 


15 


Aug. 


20 


Aug. 


21 


Aug. 


27 


Sept 


. 3 


Sept 


4 


Sept 


17 


Sept 


24 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


22 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


26 


Dec. 


15 


Dec. 


30 



Names 



Residence 



Jeffrey Stephen Allen S. Ryegate, VT 
Cheryl Anne McCabe Somerville, MA 

Joseph Michael Campagna Marlboro , MA 
Susan Eileen Hart Lincoln, Ma 

Maksim Vladimirovich Tkachenko Somerville/ MA 
Carrie Christine Frankenberg Lincoln, MA 



Peter David Lawrence 
Michelle Jean Seville 
Peter Adrian Thomas 
Nancy J. Coons 
Bernard Charles Welch, 
Celia Girard Pastoriza 
Chris A. Hales 
Michele Lynn Racicot 
John Leslie Perdue 
Dawn Theresa Ferrara 
Mark Steven Wilkins 
Tracie Lynn Burt 
Matthew Stone Kitner 
Tracy Lee Morton 
Steven James Tyrrell 
Elisa Marie Sartori 
Willard Lee Umphrey 
Anne Marie Latcham 
Roger A.K. Burton 
Peggy W. Burton 
Jon Michael Shisler 
Lisa Anne Boyce 
Kaizad Rumy Mis try 
Leslie Elliott Armijo 
Jonathan Eric Snider 
Jennifer Rachel Revis 
Peter Alan Barnes 
Jeanne Estelle Morrill 
Thomas Patrick Dougherty 
Janice B. Foust 



CA 



Fraser, CO 
Fraser, CO 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
JR. New York, NY 
New York, NY 
Lincoln, MA 
Sudbury, MA 
Corona Del Mar, 
Lincoln, MA 
Epping, NH 
Epping, NH 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Essex Junction, VT 
Essex Junction, VT 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Maiden, MA 
Lincoln, Ma 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
New York, NY 
New York, NY 
Lincoln, MA 
Lincoln, MA 
Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia, 



PA 
PA 






187 



DEATHS 



Date 


of 


Death 


1993 




Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


20 


1994 




Jan. 


12 


Jan. 


12 


Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


22 


Apr. 


2 


Apr. 


6 


Apr. 


26 


May 


1 


June 


15 


June 


23 


July 


1 


July 


3 


July 


21 


Aug. 


7 


Aug. 


26 


Sept. 


10 


Sept. 


18 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


18 


Oct. 


21 


Nov. 


9 


Nov. 


19 


Nov. 


24 


Nov. 


30 



Name 



Charles A. Newcombe, 
Nicholas L. D'Urso 
Katherine R. O'Brien 



III 



Sarah M. Corey 
Elizabeth Ann Sheehan 
Marion E. VanZilen 
Hazel Griffin Barber 
Charles Andrew Maloney 
Roger Williams Harris 
Lawrence Bernhart Anderson 
Philip J. Farrell 
Muriel H. Bradford 
Madge Kenyon Fisher 
James J. Panetta 
Francis Davie Edes 
Ina G. Peterson 
Marie Alice Lester 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Zenobia Sidberry 
Ronald Charles Davis 
David Marbury Donaldson 
Phyllis C. Swift 
Charles H. Flanigan 
Alan Bruce Courage 
Carl Leonard Anderson 
Edwin Muncks Cole 
Frederick Thomas Murphy, Jr 
Gertrude W. Todd 



Years 



34 
72 
86 



65 
54 
30 
91 
43 
73 
87 
78 
84 
69 
73 
74 
80 
70 
83 
69 
70 
56 
75 
71 
46 
81 
90 
74 
88 



188 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Stephen V. Gray 

Conrad H. Todd 

Virginia M. Niles, Chairman 

During fiscal year 1994, which ended June 30, 1994, the 
principal, income and bequests available for future investment were 
invested in U. S. Treasury securities. The policy of selecting 
various maturity dates to provide flexibility with respect to the 
investment needs of each trust fund has been continued this past 
year. By adhering to this policy an average yield of 7.47% was 
maintained for the fiscal year. 

In December, 1994, as in previous years, the Commissioners 
forwarded to the administrators of each trust fund the financial 
statements for the previous fiscal year ended June 30, 1994, together 
with a cover letter highlighting the Fund's purposes, the operating 
activity for the year and the accumulated income available. 

Again we recognize the valuable assistance of Cynthia Bouchard, 
Assistant Treasurer, whose efforts and commitment account for the 
timely and accurate financial reporting. 

Individual statements of each trust fund for the year ending 
June 30, 1994 are submitted with this report. 

On June 27th Richard H. Churchill, Jr. submitted his 
resignation to the Selectmen since he and his family were moving to 
Concord. At a later date in fiscal 1995 the Selectmen appointed 
Stephen Gray to serve for the remainder of Mr. Churchill's term. 



189 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 
Administered by three elected Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $13,088.61 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 3,656.36 

Transfer from John Todd - FY94 2,038.15 

Securities Matured 5,947.50 

Interest Applied to Amortize 432.18 

Capital Gain 93.90 

$25,256.70 

Payments: 
Honoraria per order of Trustees 

Jean Kilbourne, Imago, 

Allen Wilson and 

Theatreworks/USA 6,587.50 

Lecture Expenses 2,027.77 

Printing and Postage 1,493.49 

Purchase of Securities 6,118.13 

Ace. Interest 130.56 

16,357.45 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $8,899.25 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 8,899.2 5 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 3,000.00 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 7.75% 02/15/95 14,000.00 

$3,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 4.00% 10/1/95 3,000.00 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 2,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 977.82 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 2,965.31 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 10/15/97 3,000.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 12/31/97 3,000.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 7.125% 10/15/98 6,000.00 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 6,000.00 

$52,842.38 

Accumulated Income 20,715.31 

Principal 32,127.07 

$52,842.38 



190 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 
Administered by the Cemetery Commissioners 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $33,436.75 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 3,217.37 

Sale of Lots 6,490.00 

Capital Gain 4.68 

Securities Matured 2,995.32 

Interest Applied to Amortize 59.06 

$46,203.18 

Payments : 

Transfer to Town per Town Meeting Vote 650.00 

New Cemetary Maps 2,000.00 

Purchase Securities 3,059.06 

Accrued Interest 65.27 

$5,774.33 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $40,428.85 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $40,428.85 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 10,000.00 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 4,978.13 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 9,778.10 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 3,000.00 

$68,185.08 

Accumulated Income 25,197.13 

Principal 42,987.95 

$68,185.08 



191 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $ 480.51 

Receipts : 

Interest Income 99 . 56 

$ 580.07 

Payments: 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $580.07 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 580.07 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 1,000.00 

$1,580.07 

Accumulated Income 355.02 

Principal 1, 225.05 

$1,580.07 



192 



JOHN TODD TRUST FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen and 

the Bemis Lecture Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $1,175.00 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 2,103.42 

Securities Matured 3,000.00 

Interest Applied to Amortize 59.06 

6,337.48 

Payments: 

Purchase Securities 3,059.06 

Accumulated Interest 65.27 

Transfer to Bemis FY94 2,038.15 

$5,162.48 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $1,175.00 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1,175.00 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 14,000.00 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 03/31/97 2,000.00 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 05/15/97 5,000.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 3,000.00 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 11/15/08 5,000.00 

$30,175.00 

Accumulated Income 0.00 

Principal 30,175.00 

$30,175.00 



193 



TRICENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $ 716.16 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 280.05 

$ 996.21 

Payments: 

None 0.00 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $ 996.21 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $ 996.21 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 3,000.00 

$3,996.21 

Accumulated Income 2,996.21 

Principal 1,000.00 

$3,996.21 

DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $5,370.97 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 638 . 14 

$6,009.11 

Payments: 

None 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $6,009.11 

Cash and Securities at Cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 6,009.11 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 1,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 02/15/96 1,000.00 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.00% 10/15/96 1,955.64 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 03/31/97 1,000.00 

$10,964.75 

Accumulated Income 5,708.68 

Principal 5, 256.07 

$10,964.75 



194 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $1,252.44 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 32.08 

$1,284.52 
Payments : 

None 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $1,284.52 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $1,284.52 

Accumulated Income $1,284.52 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $109.17 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 307.22 

Securities Matured 3,000.00 

Interest Applied to Amortize 59.06 

$3,475.45 

Payments: 

Transfer to Scholarship FY94 241.95 

Purchase Securities 3,059.06 

Accumulated Interest 65.27 

$3,366.28 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $109.17 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 109.17 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 3,000.00 

$3,109.17 

Accumulated Income 1,874.17 

Principal 1,235.00 

$3,109.17 



195 



JOSEPH BROOKS GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $235.71 

Receipts : 

Interest Income 93 .36 

$329.07 

Payments : 

Transfer to Town FY94 93.36 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $235.71 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 235.71 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 981.56 

Principal $1,217.27 

LAWRENCE H. GREEN FUND 

Administered by the President of the Lincoln PTA, the Chairman of 
the Lincoln Elementary School Committee and the Superintendent of the 
Lincoln Elementary Schools. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $1,236.02 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 118. 92 

$1,354.94 

Payments : 

None 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $1,354.94 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 1,354.94 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 981.56 

$2,336.50 

Accumulated Income 1,028.85 

Principal 1,307.65 

$2,336.50 



196 



CHRISTINE PATTERSON FUND 

Administered by the Principal of the Brooks or Hartwell School, a 
staff member of the Brooks or Hartwell School, and a parent selected 
by the Board of Directors of the Lincoln PTA 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $2,669.24 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 1,030.95 

$3,700.19 

Payments : 

None 0*00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $3,700.19 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 3,700.19 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 9,815.65 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 1,000.00 

$14,515.84 

Accumulated Income 3,090.79 

Principal 11,425.05 

$14,515.84 

LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $4,314.52 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 1,290.95 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $5,605.47 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $5,605.47 

Accumulated Income $5,605.47 



197 



DE CORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 



$377.82 



Receipts : 

Interest Applied to Amortize 
Interest Income 
Securities Matured 
Capital Gain 



59.06 

2,033.82 

5,946.56 

74.14 

$8,491.40 



Payments: 

Transfer to Town - FY94 
Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest 



1,968.55 

3,059.06 

65.27 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 



5,092.88 
$3,398.52 



MMDT Compoj 
$2,000 U.S 
$2,000 U.S, 
$3,000 U.S, 
$2,000 U.S 
$2,000 U.S 
$4,000 U.S 
$1,000 U.S 
$3,000 U.S 
$3,000 U.S 

Principal 



ite Trust 
Treasury 
Treasury 
Treasury 
Treasury 
Treasury 
Treasury 
Treasury 
Treasury 
Treasury 



Fund 

8.625% 8/15/94 
12.625% 5/15/95 
8.625% 10/15/95 
8.875% 2/15/96 
6.125% 12/31/96 
6.875% 3/31/97 
8.50% 5/15/97 
6.00% 10/15/99 
8.75% 11/15/08 



3,398.52 
2,000.00 
1,962.50 
3,000.00 
2,000.00 
2,000.00 
4,000.00 
988.44 
3,000.00 
2,925.00 

$25,274.46 



198 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Administered by three Trustees, one each appointed by the 
Selectmen, the Lincoln School Committee and the Town Moderator 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 



$31,884.60 



Receipts: 

Interest Income 

Interest Applied to Amortize 

General Appeal 

Securities Matured 

Transfer from Jane Poor Fund 

Capital Gain 

Ogden Codman Grant 



9,976.90 

676.89 

8,795.00 

26,652.51 

241.95 

450.99 

5,000.00 

$83,678.84 



Payments : 

Grants per order of Trustees 

Awards 

Printing and Postage 

Purchase of Securities 

Accrued Interest 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 



17,000.00 
1,500.00 

646.81 
15,295.31 

326.37 



34,768.49 
$48,910.35 



Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 
$15,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 
, Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 
Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 
$5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% 1/1/96 
$9,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 
Treasury 6.875% 03/31/97 
, Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 
, Treasury 6.00% 12/31/97 
Treasury 7.875% 1/15/98 
$15,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 
320 Shares Exxon Corporation 
100 Shares NIPSCO Industries, Inc. 

Principal 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 
Eleanor Tead Fund 
Ogden Codman Endowment Fund 

Accumulated Income 



$10,000 U.S 
$4,000 U.S. 



$1,000 U.S. 
$10,000 U.S 
$11,000 U.S 
$6,000 U.S. 



1,000.00 
1,770.00 
6,005.00 
1,120.00 
9,645.00 



48,910.35 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

15,000.00 

9,956.24 

3,926.24 

987.50 

000.00 

000.00 

943.75 

11,000.00 

5,934.38 

15,000.00 

3,016.85 

2,973.63 

$151,648.94 



19,540.00 

132,108.94 

$151,648.94 



199 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen and managed by the 
Pierce Property Committee 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 

Receipts : 

Interest Income 

Use of Pierce House - Fees and Deposits 

Elsie Pierce Trust 

Securities Matured 

Interest applied to amortize 

Capital Gain 



$30,931.19 



6,847.93 

54,912.00 

3,304.44 

26,000.00 

2,994.69 

215.00 

$125,205.25 



Payments : 

Grants per order of the Selectmen 

COA - Podiatry Clinic 

60+ Health Clinic 
Pierce House Expenses 

Supplies and Furnishings 

Repairs and Maintenance 

Manager Compensation 

Gas for Heating 

Other Utilities 

Mowing Pierce Park 

Rubbish Removal 

Return of Deposits 

Purchase of Securities 

Ace. Int. 



1,875.00 
1,776.00 

5,135.57 

2,602.46 

9,190.00 

4,997.30 

4,915.84 

4,092.20 

1,969.00 

15,900.00 

24,200.95 

608.11 



77,262.43 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $ 47,942.82 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

Unrestricted as to Principal and Income 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 44,213.78 

44,213.78 



200 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 

Restricted as to Principal 

MMDT - Cash 3,729.04 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 8.625% 8/15/94 1,000.00 

$10,000 U.S. Treas. 5.50% 2/15/95 10,000.00 

$20,000 U.S. Treas. 9.50% 11/15/95 20,000.00 

$10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% 1/1/96 9,975.00 

$10,000 Pac. Gs & Ele. Co. 4.625% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

$20,000 U.S. Treas. 8.75% 10/15/97 20,000.00 

$10,000 Am. T & T Co. 4.75% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 6.00% 10/15/99 1,000.00 

$20,000 U.S. Treas. 7.875% 11/15/99 21,606.26 

$10,000 S.W. Bell Tel. Co. 8.25% 3/1/14 9,503.50 $116,813.80 

$161,027.58 



Accumulated Income 44,213.78 

Principal - 116,813.80 

$161,027.58 



201 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 
Administered by the Library Trustees 
Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 $22,748.62 



Receipts : 

Interest Income by Fund 

Codman Library Trust Fund 
Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth, 
& Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 
Alice Downing Hart & 

Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 
John H. Pierce Library Fund 
George Russell Library Fund 
Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

Int. Applied to Amortize 
George G. Tarbell Fund 
C. Edgar Wheeler & 
Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
Int. Applied to Amortize 
George C. Tarbell & 
Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
Int. Applied to Amortize 
Lincoln Library Fund 
Katherine S. Bolt Fund 
John W. Carman & 

Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 

Int. Applied to Amortize 
Herschbach Library Fund 
Virginia S. Dillman Fund 
West Abrashkin Fund 
Capital Gain 
Securities Matured 



27.64 



66.47 



37.53 






44.33 






28.45 






121.93 






19.69 






262.09 






107.98 






19.69 






394.04 






787.50 






45.03 


v 




6.79 






2,447.41 






130.92 






39.38 






266.50 






455.12 






18.46 


5,326. 


,95 




534, 


.38 




28,595, 


,62 




$57,205, 


,57 



Payments: 

To Librarian from J.H. Pierce - 

Library Fund 
Purchase of Books, Tapes & Video: 
Purchase Furniture 
Writer's Workshop 
Purchase Computer Equipment 

and Software 
Acoustical Tile 
Entry Design 
Purchase Securities 
Accumulated Interest 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 



58.52 
482.02 
869.01 
400.00 

3,050.00 
2,000.00 

488.51 
15,669.38 

380.21 



23,397.65 
$33,807.92 



202 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 
Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 
Codman Library Trust Fund 
Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth & 

Murray F. Farnsworth Fund 
Alice Downing Hart & 

Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 
John H. Pierce Library Fund 
George Russell Library Fund 
Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 
George G. Tarbell Library Fund 
C. Edgar Wheeler & 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
George G. Tarbell & 

Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

*Lincoln Library Fund 
*Katherine S. Bolt Fund 
John W. Carman & 

Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
Lucretia Jones Hoover Fund 
*Herschbach Library Fund 
Virginia S. Dillman Fund 
West Abrashkin Fund 



Accumulated 






Income 


Principal 


Total 


39.04 


1,000.00 


1,039.04 


1,777.63 


1,000.00 


2,777.63 


570.51 


1,000.00 


1,570.51 


44.33 


1,000.00 


1,044.33 


189.91 


1,000.00 


1,189.91 


437.57 


500.00 


937.57 


1,569.58 


2,000.00 


3,569.58 


354.49 


0.00 


354.49 


(908.65) 


72.50 


(836.15) 


44.73 


1,000.00 


1,044.73 


1.49 


0.00 


1.49 


2,841.21 


12,707.82 


15,549.03 


277.24 


206.26 


483.50 


694.90 


3,000.00 


3,694.90 


593.64 


21.87 


615.51 


36.85 


735.00 


771.85 


$8,564.47 


$25,243.45 


$33,807.92 



203 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Securities Principal 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 1,000.00 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 1,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 7.125% 10/15/98 1,000.00 
George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

$10,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 11/15/99 10,803.12 
C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 1,000.00 

John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 

$6,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 6,000.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 10/15/95 2,944.68 

$9,000 U.S. Treasury 6.875% 3/31/97 9,000.00 

*Herschbach Library Fund 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.625% 8/15/94 2,000.00 

Lucretia J. Hoover Fund 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 6.00% 10/15/99 2,000.00 
Virginia S. Dillman Fund 

$5,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 7/15/95 4,978.13 



41,725.93 
$75,533.85 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



8,564.47 
66,969.38 



* Unrestricted 



$75,533.85 



204 



NORMAN HAPGOOD FUND 
Administered by Roy Raja 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 90.80 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 2.32 

$93.12 

Payments: 

None 0.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $93.12 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $93.12 

Accumulated Income $93.12 

ALFRED CALLAHAN FUND 

Administered by the principal of Brooks School and the Brooks 
School Eighth Grade Teaching Team 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1993 99.58 

Receipts: 

Interest Income 170.18 

$269.76 

Payments: 

None 0.00 

$ 269.76 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1994 $269.76 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1994 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $269.76 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 5.50% 02/15/95 3,000.00 

$3,269.76 

Accumulated Income $253.83 

Principal 3,015.93 

$3,269.76 



205 



VALUATION LIST 1994 



As of the deadline for this Town Report, the official valuations 
for properties in Lincoln are just what they were in last year's 
report. Properties may have new owners, but the values cannot be 
legally changed and made public without certification by the Common- 
wealth's Department of Revenue. The DOR has yet to certify us 
because we have not completed putting all the necessary real property 
data for the Town onto our new computer system. 

When this process is finished and the state DOR has made our 
valuations official, then the results will be published in the local 
press — making possible one of Lincoln's favorite indoor winter 
sports — before the season is over. 



206 




FINANCIAL SECTION AND WARRANT FOR THE 

1995 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 






COVER: Shy kid, chicken farmer, gardener, family man, lay preacher, 
leading lawyer, mentor, and Town Moderator, David Donaldson reminded 
us by example that Lincoln is above all else our hometown, and that as 
such, we each owe it our best. 



(Photo courtesy of the Lincoln Journal ) 



REPORT 

of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 
1995 - 1996 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Rosamond P. Delori 

Rainer L.C. Frost 

Georgene B. Herschbach 

Marcia A. Roehr 

Gary A. Taylor 

Peter J. Watkinson 

Alvin L. Schmertzler, Chairman 



REPORT 
of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

FOR THE YEAR 
1995 - 1996 



LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1995 - 1996 

CONTENTS 

I. Introduction 
II. Overview 
III. Revenue Estimates 

A. Tax Levy 

B. Non-Tax Revenues 

C. Taxation 

D. Free Cash 

E. Stabilization Fund 

IV. Operating Budgets 

A. Salaries 

B. Expenses 

C. Non School Expenses 

D. Summary 

E. Education 

1. Elementary Schools 

2. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

3. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 

F. Department of Public Works 

G. Public Safety 

H. Water Department 

I. Conservation Commission 

J. Library 

K. Debt 

L. Pensions and Insurance 

V. Proposition 2 1/2 Budget and FY96 Projections 

VI. Five-Year Capital Plan 

VII. School Building Project 

VIII. Public Safety Building 

IX. Conclusion 

Exhibits 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 
1995-1996 

I . INTRODUCTION 

This year's budget process has had two components. The first was 
to develop an operating budget. The second was to integrate payment 
for the four (4) major capital projects into the Annual Budget. The 
projects are: The Public School Buildings Renovation; The Public 
Safety Building Renovation; the procurement of technological systems 
in the schools and in the various Town departments; and the 
replacement of deteriorating rolling stock in the public safety 
department (excluding police cruisers which have been systematically 
replaced) . 

Our plan is to fund these projects in as predictable and orderly 
a manner as possible. From comments made by the few citizens who 
attended our meetings and in conversations with others, we were urged 
to consider controlling large swings in the tax rate, to keep tax 
rate increases as close to the rate of inflation as possible and to 
maintain the level " of excluded debt by carefully timing the new 
financing. Our goal has been to keep the cost of staying in Lincoln 
within the reach of our citizens while bringing our well-used 
facilities into a condition that will allow them to continue to serve 
us. 

The scheduling of the construction and financing of these 
projects requires that we balance the effects of delays that result 
in rising costs against the ability of the Town's citizens to pay now 
for what we need. We believe that the schedule of construction and 
financing we are supporting does balance these factors. 

As the Town undertakes new commitments under the direction of 
volunteer committees, we believe it is important to acknowledge the 
leadership and expertise of the School Building Committee volunteers 
and all those who worked with them. Their predictions have impressed 
us with their accuracy. 

As they planned and predicted, the School Facilities and 
Management Services Bureau (SFSB) funds did come in and sooner than 
anticipated. Construction costs have gone up significantly since we 
bid and started the project so the timing was correct in that 
regard. Short term interest rates have also risen sharply so we were 
fortunate on the timing of that transaction as well. 

Tax rate increases in the last two years have been kept below 5%, 
helped by the stabilization funds set aside last year. We believe, 
based on the projections provided to you, that tax rates will remain 
below 5% including the override that is being proposed. With the 
reasoned and prudent leadership of the Public Safety Building 
Committee and the Selectmen we expect that project to be similarly 
successful. The other two projects, technology and public safety 
rolling stock, are being given the same scrutiny as their proven 



predecessor, the School Building project. We look forward to their 
completion. 

As part of a long-term plan to minimize the impact of financing 
too many major programs in a short space of time, the Committee is 
looking to practices employed in the private sector for methods of 
coping with obsolescence and allowances for depreciation. We are 
planning to pursue preventative maintenance and set-aside programs 
more vigorously than in the past. We have discussed with the 
Selectmen the necessity of reinstituting a Long Range Capital 
Planning Committee. These steps are all part of the process of 
simultaneously operating the Town, protecting its assets and 
preparing for the future. 

During the past year, the Finance Committee has had the benefit 
of the freguent counsel of several citizens who, until this year, had 
chosen not to participate in Town government. By their making the 
effort to participate in the budget process, both we and they have 
gained. We have urged each other to be forthright and we have 
attempted to be so. With that thought in mind, we want to bring to 
everyone's attention that last year, in this section of The Report, 
we recommended - for the second year in a row - "a modest tax 
increase and no override. It has also helped us prepare for the 
future overrides that we believe will be necessary to provide the 
level of services that we have come to expect and depend on". 

That time has come and we hope you will support the budget we 
have prepared and the override that is part of the plan. 

II. OVERVIEW 

The Finance Committee recommends a Town budget of $14,069,530.92 
for FY96, an increase of $975,636.21 or 7.46% over FY95. This budget 
does NOT include the warrant articles. A significant portion of the 
overall increase is due to rising debt service which will climb from 
$1,075,362.51 in FY95 to $1,596,717.50, an increase of 48.48%. 
Increases include $219,022.00 (5%) for the Lincoln Elementary 
Schools; $154,155.21 (14.37%) for the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School which is based on increased attending populations; $32,754.00 
(7.44%) for the Library; $37,276.00 (3.81%) for General Government. 
Decreases include $33,609.00 (33.98%) for Minuteman Vo-Tech High 
School largely due to decreased enrollment. 

III. REVENUE ESTIMATES 

The net estimated revenues for FY96 are $15,174,000.00, up over 
FY95 ($13,691,000.00). The reasons are: a) State aid is estimated 
to be increased to $1,013,000 from $974,000 in FY95; b) An increase 
in estimated local receipts of $148,000.00; c) A recommendation to 
use $1,055,330 from Free Cash (see a detailed review of Free Cash 
later in the report); d) SFSB reimbursement of $681,000 to offset 
school construction debt. 



Here follows a detailed explanation of the budget together with 
appropriate tables and charts: 

TABLE I 

Revenue Comparisons Fiscal Years 1994, 1995, and 1996 - (OOP's) 



Levy Limit 

New Construction 

Excluded Debt 

Override 

Tax Levy 

Local Receipts 

State Aid 

Free Cash 

SFSB Funds 

Other Available Funds 



Total Assessments 

Net Available Revenues 



FY94 


FY95 


FY96 


(Actual) 


(RecapHl) 


(Projected) 


$ 8,830 


$ 9,213 


$ 9,545 


158 


100 


204 


960 


1,112 


1,121 
160 


$ 9,943 


$10,425 


$11,030 


1,100 


1,435 


1,583 


945 


974 


1,013 


1,000 


910 


1,055 
681 


685 


348 


210 


$13,673 


$14,092 


$15,572 


$ (388) 


$ (401) 


$ (398) 



(1) Taken from the Recapitulation Sheet which all towns have to file 

with the State Department of Revenues at the end of the prior 

fiscal year: it is the data used by the Assessors to calculate 
the tax rate, which has to be certified by the DOR. 

A. Tax Levy 

The tax levy is set by the Assessors after the Appropriations (to 
cover anticipated expenditures) are voted at the Town Meeting. The 
Appropriations represent monies to fund the various Town services, 
while the tax levy contributes to the revenues required to pay for 
these services. While there are some non-tax revenues the Town can 
count on, in years when there is a gap between all revenue sources and 
the appropriations voted at Town Meeting, this gap has to be bridged 
by the approval of an override, the amount of which is set by the 
Selectmen. We believe an override, this year, is a prudent decision. 
The Town needs to replace aged pieces of fire apparatus. In 
recommending an override for this specific purpose the Finance 
Committee thinks that the purchase at this time will moderate "spikes" 
in taxes. The "spikes" would occur were we forced to make the 
acquisition in the next several years when there will be extreme 
pressure on the tax rate as we start making payments on the debt for 
the School Building and Public Safety projects. The use of an 
override to effect this purchase will also help to moderate tax 
increases in future years, as part of our tax management program. 



B. Non-Tax Revenues 

This year, some non-tax revenues are estimated at a higher level 
than they were in FY95. With the Selectmen, we examined the 
historical record of these sources of funds. It was agreed that 
modest increases in selected categories of non-tax revenues was 
reasonable. For this year only , the amount of revenue from new 
construction will be 50% higher than historic averages due to the 
allowed use of an additional six months of new construction growth. 
All current indications are that State Aid, including funds for the 
Education Reform Act, will remain at approximately the same level as 
last year. 

C. Taxation 

The general level of taxation has been close to the rate of 
inflation on a long term basis. If our recommendation for a $160,000 
override is accepted, we will have a tax rate increase of 3.84%. 
Employing a managed tax rate strategy that will keep the tax rate 
just slightly above inflation for the next several years will require 
several overrides. However, by keeping tax rate increases below 5%, 
we will be doing better than we stated last year in The Report when 
we said "There are going to be years ahead when we can expect our 
taxes to increase 5-6% annually." 

Planning is the key. The Finance Committee continues to examine 
budgets looking ahead up to five years at a time and taking into 
consideration such capital plans as the various town boards and 
committees may prepare in response to our requests. We intend to 
continue to hold periodic open discussions with the citizens to hear 
their views and receive their input for the establishment and 
modification of the Town's long term policies. 

D. Free Cash 

Free Cash comprises turn-backs which result from budgetary 
surpluses in various budget line items together with additional and 
unforeseen revenues. These monies are certified by the State in the 
fall of each year and are then returned to the General Funds for use 
in a future budget. The Finance Committee agreed with the Selectmen 
in establishing a coherent approach for the use of Free Cash based on 
discussions with bond rating agencies and some financial 
institutions. As a result we now have a consistent policy in place 
to sustain a reasonable level of Free Cash. The intent of the policy 
is to maintain a reserve in the Free Cash account equal to a minimum 
of 5% of the operating budget. In addition, we believe that it is 
prudent to spend no more than approximately 50% of the available Free 
Cash. These policies should maintain our current rating of Aal. It 
is that quality rating that helps keep down the cost of borrowing. 

Last fall, Free Cash was certified at $2,013,168. This year we 
have recommended the use of $1,055,330 from Free Cash for the 



operating budget and warrant articles. (See Table II for amounts of 
Free Cash certified/ used and retained on a year to year basis). 

TABLE II 

Amount of Free Cash Used 

FY CERTIFIED EXPENDITURES BALANCE 

07/01/87 $ 535,751 $ 435,751 $100,000 

07/01/88 600,284 452,000 148,284 

07/01/89 866,079 600,000 266,079 

07/01/90 1,093,858 510,000 583,858 

07/01/91 1,531,461 890,797 640,664 

07/01/92 1,837,741 1,000,000 837,741 

07/01/93 2,061,108 1,150,000 911,108 

07/01/94 2,013,168 1,055,330 957,838 

E. Stabilization Fund 

The mechanism exists, by law, for Towns to put aside certain 
monies in a "Stabilization Fund" to be used in later years for a 
variety of purposes and at times when funds may be tighter. This 
year we are NOT recommending that funds raised from taxes be added to 
those set aside last year*. However, as part of the plan to "manage" 
the tax rate, we will be asking for such funds in future years to 
keep rate increases below 5% in what would otherwise be "peak" years 
(see Graph 1). The intent, as stated last year, "is to keep the Fund 
in existence for 3-4 years and feed the money back into the revenue 
stream to help keep the tax rate from increasing inordinately." 

IV. OPERATING BUDGETS 

The operating budget for FY96 is $14,069,530.92. As predicted 
last year, we are recommending an override this year but NOT to 
finance the operating budget. 

Enrollment increases at the Elementary School were modest this 
year. At this time the School Committee is not requesting extra 
sections. Increases in "steps" and contractual agreements plus 
greater fuel costs account for the bulk of the increase in their 
budget. There are to be more students at the High School and a 
larger proportion of the student body will come from Lincoln. As a 
result, our assessment will grow accordingly. A reduction in our 
population at Minuteman will result in a drop in that assessment. 

*Note: Most of this year's SFSB payment will be used to pay 
interest charges on the short term borrowing for the School Building 
project. The remainder will be added to the existing Stabilization 
Fund and used when we begin to retire the bonded debt. 



The Town was again able to bring in a budget that was just about 
at the level of inflation while maintaining level service, a tribute 
to the hard work of the entire staff. 

There are three items that do NOT appear in municipal operating 
budgets but have a marked impact on them. They are: reserve for 
depreciation, non-daily maintenance and capital improvements. In 
municipal finance, there is no standard, private sector style method 
to deal with the first issue. The Finance Committee has placed this 
issue on its agenda of problems to be solved in consultation with the 
Selectmen, the Executive Secretary and the Finance Director. 
Non-daily maintenance and capital improvements are dealt with as 
warrant articles and are major expenditures on this year's warrant. 

We believe through well conceived financial planning and the 
judicious introduction of labor saving technology, as proposed in 
this year's budget, we will keep operating budgets manageable in the 
future . 

A. Salaries 

Salaries are a major item for both the Town and School budgets. 
Cost of living raises for employees are part of the year-to-year 
salary increases. Step increases, as well as longevity increases, 
are also given annually to those employees who qualify under terms 
contained in the Personnel Board's guidelines. The salary figures 
below include steps, longevity, and cost of living increases for all 
Town employees. This marks a change from prior years when cost of 
living increases for non-union Town employees were included 
separately in a warrant article to be voted each year by the annual 
Town Meeting. 

Table III details all salary line items other than those for 
School personnel. While there are no additions or reductions of 
positions in the Town's FY96 budget (exclusive of School personnel), 
it should be noted that several long time department heads, including 
the Town's Executive Secretary, Town Accountant and Chief of Fire and 
Police, departed during 1994. 









TABLE 


III 














Distribution 


of 


Town 


Salaries 










(000's 


omitted/ rounded) 










FY 


94 




FY 95 






FY 


96 


% 




Actual 




Budaet 




Propo 


sed*(l) 


Inc/(Dec) 


Salaries 






















Town Offices 


$ 


578 




$ 


585 






$ 


591 


1.0 


Conservation 




88 






94 








99 


5.3 


Assessors 




40 






45*(2) 






51*(2) 


13.3 


Police 




575 






605 








622 


2.8 


Fire 




536 






563 








587 


4.3 


Ambulance 




17 






18 








19 


5.6 


Communications 




121 






120 








124 


3.3 


Building Dept. 




61 






68 








72 


5.9 


Board of Health 




67 






72 








75 


4.2 


Council on Aging 




44 






54*(3) 






60*(3) 


11.1 


Public Works 




367 






406 








413 


1.7 


Library 




307 






330 








355 


7.6 


Recreation 




137 






152 








154 


1.3 



TOTAL 



$2,938 



$3,112 



$3,222 



3.5% 



Notes: 

(1) The FY96 salary figures above include a 4% cost of living increase 
for the final year of contracts as negotiated with the Town's unions. 
The departure of several long time Town employees in 1994 is reflected 
in an overall increase of only 3.5% in FY96 salaries for Town 
employees. 

(2) The FY94 budget provided for a position of Assistant Assessor for 
the first time. Following a two year experience with the new 
position, it became apparent the qualifications in a two grade upgrade 
for the position would better provide for the services required by the 
Town. The FY96 salary reflects that increase. 

(3) FY96 salaries for the Council on Aging is the result of an 
increase from a 37 1/2 hour week to a 40 hour week in the 
administrator position plus the other Personnel Board guideline 
increases including COL increases. 

B. Expenses 



Fixed costs, excluding debt service, declined again in FY96. 
This year, pensions, property insurance and health insurance all 
declined for a total reduction of $180,000 or 9.4%. 



Debt service increased this year as payment begins on the School 
Building project. Also included, in the event that it may be needed, 
is an amount of $150,000 for interest on temporary borrowing for the 
Public Safety Building. 

C. Non School Expenses 



General Government 
Public Safety 
Health and Sanitation 
Public Works 
Library 
Recreation 
Cemetery 
Unclassified 
Subtotals 

Reserve Fund 



TABLE 


IV 










Non-School Expenses (000 


*s) 


f96 




FY94 


FY9 5 


Fl 


% 


Budaet 


Budaet 


Proposed 


Inc/(Dec) 


$ 255 


$ 


255 


$ 


272 


6.70 


160 




162 




175 


8.02 


28 




28 




25 


(10.71) 


554 




500 




529 


5.80 


99 




110 




118 


7.27 


47 




52 




50 


(3.85) 


15 




16 




16 


0.00 


60 




50 




44 


(12.00) 


$1,218 


$1 


,173 


$1 


,229 


4.77 


250 




150 




250 


66.67 



TOTALS 



$1,468 $1,323 



$1,479 



11.79 



The main element in the greater amount of Non-School Expenses is 
the recommendation of the Finance Committee to increase the Reserve 
Fund to $250,000. The reason is as follows. 

The Committee believes that not every negative possibility that 
is anticipated, and provided for in a budget, will occur. Therefore, 
instead of requesting enough funds for every contingency in every line 
item, we believe it is more reasonable to provide line item budgets 
with funds only for issues that are at least 50% likely to occur. To 
deal with all the other possibilities, an increase is requested for 
the Reserve Fund to be allocated for the few unlikely contingencies 
that do occur. In so doing, we anticipate reducing the total amount 
requested for unpredictable expenses. It is hoped that even some 
fraction of this fund will not be needed and will return to Free Cash 
just as unexpended line item balances have in the past. We will 
revisit this plan at the end of the year to evaluate its effectiveness. 

D. Summary 



Table V is a summary of appropriations and indicates an overall 
increase of 7.6%; for the Elementary Schools 5%; for the three school 
systems combined 6.1%. 



Removing the three school systems from the calculations results 
in a net increase in the budget of $634,000 or 8.8%. Of that amount 
($634,000)/ $522,000 is for debt service and $100,000 is for the 
increase in the Reserve Fund. Absent those two items, the change in 
the Town's budget is $12,000 or .16%. Keeping costs down and still 
delivering an acceptable level of service, is the result of the hard 
work and dedication of the Selectmen and the Town staff. 







TABLE 


7 






Distribution of Budcret - Comparisons 






FY94, 


•95, and 


•96 (000' 


s) 








FY94 


FY95 


FY96 


% 






(Actual) 


(Recap) 


(Proposed) 


Inc/(Dec) 


General Government 


(1) 


$ 978 


$ 979 


$1,013 


3.5 


Public Safety (2) 




1,484 


1,535 


1,597 


4.0 


Health & Sanitation 


(3) 


129 


146 


156 


6.8 


Public Works 




915 


906 


942 


4.0 


Library 




406 


440 


473 


7.5 


Recreation 




180 


205 


204 


(0.5) 


Housing Commission 




37 


26 


11 


(57.7) 


Other 




43 


39 


52 


33.3 


Debt Service 




1,290 


1,075 


1,597 


48.6 


Pensions 




464 


487 


409 


(16.0) 


Employee Health Ins 


. 


837 


1,008 


986 


(2.2) 


Prop. & Indem. Ins. 




162 


201 


141 


(29.9) 


Elementary School 




4,209 


4,380 


4,599 


5.0 


LSRHS & Vo-Tech 




1,072 


1,172 


1,293 


10.3 


Reserve Fund 




250 


150 


250 


66.7 



Total Budget Expenses $12,456 $12,479 $13,723 



10.0 



Budget Total Without 
Elementary Schools $ 8,247 $ 8,369 $ 9,124 



9.0 



Notes: 

(1) Includes Town Offices, Conservation, Assessors. 

(2) Includes Police, Fire, Ambulance, Communications, Building 
Department. 



(3) Includes Board of Health, Council on Aging. 



E. Education 



TABLE VI 
Education Budcrets (000' 


_sl 




FY94 
Actual 


FY95 
Budcret 

$4,380 

1,072 

99 


FY96 
Proposed 

$4,599 

1,227 

65 


Change 
Amount % 


$4,209 

il 991 

81 


$219 5.00 
155 14.46 
(34) (34.34) 



Elementary 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
Vo-Tech 

1. Elementary Schools 

The School Committee has presented a budget of $4,599,456 for 
FY96, representing a 5.0% increase over its FY95 budget of $4,380,434. 

Forty-six percent (46%) of the difference is attributable to 
contractual and "step" increases in faculty salaries while another 
twenty-three percent (23%) comes from the greater cost of utilities. 
Special Education (SPED) increases, while much less than last year, 
accounted for seventeen percent (17%) and reinstitution of funds for 
general equipment - which were deleted last year to reduce the budget 
increase - accounted for another nineteen percent (19%). These were 
partially offset by a decrease of fifteen percent (15%) in 
transportation costs. These few accounts represent the line items 
having the largest dollar impact. 

In addition to these increases, the School Committee has included 
new technology equipment in the FY96 operating budget in order to 
enhance its proposed implementation of the technology portion of the 
School Building project. The Finance Committee supports this 
commitment to technology and technology education in our schools and 
will work with the schools to accurately project the long-term costs 
associated with this decision. 

2. Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School 

The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School has presented a budget 
of $10,948,618 for FY96, representing a 5.88% ($608,270) increase over 
its FY95 budget of $10,340,348. 

The level-service budget for the high school would be $10,633,974 
or 2.84% ($293,626) more than last year's total. A further increase 
of $138,996 has been proposed for staff salaries to address 1) the 
expected increase in student enrollments (1.0 FTE, $42,768); 2) the 
change in school schedule (1.5 FTE, $64,152), and the maintenance and 
expansion of the LS computer network (.75 FTE, $32,076). Proposed 
increases in the program budget include $54,000 for computer and 
networking equipment, $17,155 for instructional supplies due to the 
expected enrollment increase, $20,000 for fitness equipment, and 
$25,000 for a new tractor to replace the current 20-year-old vehicle. 



10 



Lincoln's share of the FY96 Regional High School budget will be 
larger compared with FY95 because our proportion of the student body 
(based on average enrollments during the last three years) has grown 
from 12.72% to 13.34%. After application of State Aid and savings 
from the previous year, Lincoln's apportionment of the FY96 budget is 
estimated to be $1,226,579.42, an increase of $154,155.21 (+14.37%) 
over last year. 

3. Minuteman Vo-Tech High School 

The Minuteman Tech School Committee has presented a budget of 
$11,485,208 for FY96, representing a 2.56% increase ($286,694) over 
its FY95 budget of $11,198,514. 

Salaries account for the largest line item increase in the 
schools' s budget ($459,252). Among others, there also are increases 
proposed for academic supplies ($50,878) and technology ($11,633). 
The major offsetting line item is a reduction in the cost of employee 
benefits (-$162,698). 

The regular day pupil enrollment at Minuteman Tech has increased 
over the last year by 6.4%. Enrollment by students from Lincoln, 
however, has decreased from 8.25 to 4.50 FTE. This translates to a 
decline in Lincoln's assessment from $98,898.00 to $65,289.00 
(-$33,609.00 or -33.98%). 

F. Department of Public Works 

FY96 Change 
Proposed Amount % 



FY94 


FY95 


Actual 


Budget 


$915,000 


$906,000 



Public Works $915,000 $906,000 $942,000 $36,000 4.0% 

Contractual agreements and "steps" account for the majority of 
the increase in the Department's budget; small increases in several 
areas account for the remainder. Most of those changes cover the 
increased cost of the parts and supplies used. The only personnel 
change is an intern to work on a road survey at a cost of $2,000. 



Public Safety 



FY94 FY95 FY96 Change 
Actual Budget Proposed Amount ' 



Public Safety $1,484,000 $1,535,000 $1,597,000 $62,000 4.0% 

The Public Safety Department's 4% increase is due largely to 
contractual agreements and "steps". A small amount ($5,000) has been 
included in the Police expense budget to allow the new Chief some 
flexibility in scheduling training and the possibility of acquiring a 
small amount of equipment. A similar situation applies to the Fire 
Department. 



11 



For the past several years the Selectmen have discussed and set 
aside consideration of the purchase of a new pumper. This year, 
there have been several requests for Reserve Fund transfers to cover 
emergency repairs. In addition, there have been repairs done by the 
Town's mechanics. This has become increasingly costly. To put an 
end to this type of unending and indeterminate expense, the Selectmen 
have decided to request a new engine and it appears as a warrant 
article. The new equipment will reduce the time and cost of "patch 
up" repairs and provide better coverage in fire emergencies. 

H. Water Department 

FY94 FY95 FY96 Change 
Actual Budget Proposed Amount % 

Water $345,530 $344,202 $347,528 $3,326 0.97% 

The Water Department has presented an operating budget of 
$347,528 for FY96, representing a 0.97% increase over its FY95 budget 
of $344,202. The Water Department funds all capital projects and 
operating budgets through water fees. The FY96 change in the Water 
Department operating budget is due to adjustments in Water Department 
debt and increased expenses associated with the operation of the new 
contact chamber facility. 

The capital expenditures for FY96 are projected to be $464,000 
and will be funded from the Water Department surplus from past 
years. Of this $60,000 will be used to pay down the $975,000 debt of 
the contact chamber/filtration system. Additional principal payments 
in future years will retire this debt. $300,000 will be used to 
cover cost overruns during the construction of the contact chamber 
due to ledge at the site, soil contamination testing, required change 
orders and increased engineering costs. The remaining capital 
expenses include $31,000 for a new water vehicle and $20,000 to pay 
the Town's share of upgrading the Route 2 water main between Bethany 
Drive and Crosby's Corner. There will be an additional Water 
Department expense of $75,000 to reimburse the Town for the use of 
conservation land for the proposed contact chamber. If such an 
expense is approved, it will be paid from water surplus. 

The construction of the contact chamber resulted in an unforseen 
cost of $172,000 for contaminated soil removal along Sandy Pond 
Road. The Finance Committee, the Selectmen and the Water 
Commissioners have agreed that this cost is a Town expense rather 
than a Water Department expense. Therefore, this sum will be asked 
for in a warrant article, to be raised by taxation or free cash, 
rather than water fees. 



12 



I. Conservation Commission 

The FY96 Conservation Commission budget has been increased by 
$11,009 or 10.5%. 

FY94 FY95 FY96 Change 
Actual Budget Proposed Amount % 

Conservation Commission $ 97,120 $105,150 $116,159 11,009 10.5% 

Several years ago the legal fee line item was removed from the 
Conservation Commission's budget. The Commission thus had to rely on 
funds being available in the Reserve Fund Transfer account to cover 
their legal expenses. $5,000 of the increase in the Conservation 
Commission's FY96 budget restores this line item. Also, an 
additional increase of $1,800 has been included to provide Lincoln's 
share (along with Walden Pond, Lexington, and others) in covering the 
cost of a portion of aerial survey photographs being taken of the 
Town. This will allow the Conservation Commission and other 
departments in Town (for example the Assessors) to have access to the 
photographs for use in their work. 

The Finance Committee again commends the staffs of the 
Conservation Commission, Public Works and Water Department for their 
on-going cooperation and efficiencies in sharing resources. This 
continues to work well for the Conservation Commission's year-to-year 
maintenance projects in caring for the Town's conservation lands. 
The heavy use of conservation land in Lincoln by the public continues 
to grow and preservation of these sizeable and valuable assets of the 
Town needs to be maintained. 



Library 



FY94 FY95 FY96 Change 
Actual Budget Proposed Amount %_ 



Library $405,920 $440,147 $472,901 32,754 7.4% 

The Library has presented a budget of $472,901 for FY96, 
representing a 7.4% increase over its FY95 budget of $440,147. This 
increase will allow the Library to offer a modest improvement in the 
level of service provided to the Town. It also covers the standard 
Lincoln non-unionized personnel salary increases for Library 
employees. This budget adds more Library staff coverage during the 
increased hours open to the public (15.4% more hours since FY93). 
The Library will add four hours per week each for the reference 
librarian and a circulation assistant. The budget continues the 
restoration of the book budget to within $1,000 of its FY90 level and 
provides two additional Minuteman Library Network access terminals. 

In addition to the proposed operating budget, the Library has 
requested $7,500 for the purchase of three personal computers and 



13 



printers. This amount has been included in the Town's technology 
warrant article. 

The Finance Committee supports this level of expenditure on 
Library services as a means of maintaining the restored hours open to 
the public and providing residents with up-to-date access to Library 
resources . 









TABLE VII 
















Librar 


y Statistics 


(000' 


s) 








Fiscal Yr 


1990 


1991 


1992 




1993 




1994 


1995 


1996 


Book Budget 


$ 56 


$ 60 


$ 45 




$ 30 




$ 42 


$ 50 


$ 55 


FTE Staff 


12.1 


10.3 


10.23 




10.6 




10 


10.1 


10.3 


Hr/Wk Open 


59.5 


59.5 


48 




49 




53 


57 


57 


Circ. 


81,904 


93,034 


113,226 


114,096 


122,641 


131,764 




K. Debt Service 



















The FY96 Debt Service budget has increased from FY95 by a total 
of $521,355 or 48.5%. 

FY94 FY95 FY9 6 Change 
Actual Budget Proposed Amount % 



Debt Service $1,290,252 $1,075,363 $1,596,718 521,355 48.5% 

Interest on short term borrowing for the School Building project 
is the primary reason for the FY96 Debt Service budget increase. In 
addition, an interest payment of $150,000 on temporary borrowing for 
the Public Safety Building project may be needed and therefore has 
been included in the budget should the 1995 March Town Meeting approve 
the proposed project. 

The decision about when permanent bonding of the School Building 
Construction project (approved by the 1993 March Town Meeting) and 
Public Safety Building project (if approved at the 1995 March Town 
Meeting) would be implemented is still open at the time of this 
report. In an effort to avoid dramatic increases in tax rates 
resulting from these projects in any given year, the Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee have spent considerable time studying a number of 
financial tax impact plans to determine their long-term effect on 
future budgets and tax rates. It is now known that the Town will 
begin to receive annual State Aid reimbursements of $681,000 in FY96 
for the School Building project. At the time of this report, it 
appears that principal payments on the permanent bonding for the 
School project and/or Public Safety Building project would most likely 
begin in FY97 or FY98. 



14 



L. Pensions and Insurance 

FY96 Pension and Insurance budgets have decreased from FY95 by a 
total of $159/666 or 9.42%. 



Midd. County Pension 
Health & Other Ins. 
Prop. & Indem. Ins. 



TABLE 


VIII 






Pension and 


Insurance 






FY94 


FY95 


FY96 


% 


Actual 


Budget 


Proposed 
$ 409,200 


Inc/Dec. 


$ 463,963 


$ 487,244 


(16.02) 


836,646 


1,008,000 


986,000 


(2.18) 


162,076 


200,575 


140,953 


(29.73) 


$1,462,685 


$1,695,819 


$1,536,153 


(9.42) 



The decrease reflected in these budget items are due primarily 
to the introduction of an actuarial funded pension system by 
Middlesex County Retirement System, the stabilization of health 
insurance and worker's compensation rates, and a drop in rates for 
property and indemnity insurance. 

V. PROPOSITION 2 1/2 BUDGET AND FY97 PROJECTIONS 

Budget figures for revenues limited by Proposition 2 1/2 are 
set out for FY96 in Table IX along with projections for FY97. The 
Finance Committee is recommending a modest override in FY96 in order 
to provide additional revenues to cover deferred capital needs and to 
smooth the tax rate increases that would otherwise occur as a result 
of debt service from the School Building project and, if it is 
approved, the Public Safety Building project. The recommended budget 
with an override is identical to the Proposition 2 1/2 budget except 
for an additional expenditure of $160,000 for the purchase of a fire 
truck sought in Article 9. A Proposition 2 1/2 budget (without an 
override) would result in a tax rate increase of 2.3% for FY96 over 
FY95. Including the proposed override, the tax rate increase for 
Lincoln residents would be approximately 4%. 

The revenues and operating expenses for the FY96 budget have 
been set out in detail in the previous sections. Revenues are based 
upon the Proposition 2 1/2 formula using the most current information 
available on growth in the tax base, excluded debt and non-tax 
revenues from state and local sources. Operating expenses have been 
developed from budgets submitted by Town departments and agencies and 
the schools according to Finance Committee guidelines. Projections 
for FY97 are based upon the Proposition 2 1/2 formula and expected 
changes in the various revenue and expense line items. 

While revenues exceed operating requirements by a considerable 
margin in FY96, they are insufficient to cover the expenditures 
required to fund the level of spending under warrant articles 
supported 



15 



by the Fincom. This rather extraordinary level of warrant article 
spending is due in large part to capital items deferred in previous 
years because of tight budget conditions (such as the fire engine and 
the computerization of Town Hall) and expenses related to 
environmental problems uncovered during construction of the contact 
chamber for Lincoln's water system. Furthermore, $300,000 of the 
warrant article expenditures recommended, those for road repairs and 
the salt shed, are reimbursable and would be recovered from the State 
next year. 

The Finance Committee believes that deferral of some of the 
warrant article expenditures into future years will only make matters 
worse for Lincoln's citizens. Delaying the purchase of the fire 
engine for a year, for example, would yield a small tax rate increase 
for FY96 of about 2.3%, but it would cause an increase of about 6.3% 
in FY97, based upon expected warrant article spending. By purchasing 
the fire engine this year the FY96 increase can be kept below 5%. 
"Managing" tax rate increases in this manner seems the prudent course. 

The Town's cooperation in managing the rate of tax increases is 
particularly important at this time because of the debt that Lincoln 
residents have undertaken to finance much needed construction 
projects. Even on a net basis (that is, reduced by the amount of 
state reimbursement for the SBP) Excluded Debt is expected to 
increase from $1,121,000 in FY96 to nearly $1,700,000 in FY98 and 
FY99. Fincom projections indicate that without any attempt to smooth 
the growth in taxes, this would result in year-to-year tax rate 
increases of as much as 11%. The magnitude of such increases and 
their high degree of fluctuation from year-to-year make tax planning 
and personal budgeting difficult for Lincoln citizens, particularly 
those on fixed incomes. For this reason the Fincom is recommending 
that tax rate increases be smoothed through an override in FY96 and 
the use of Free Cash in FY97 and FY98 to reduce Excluded Debt and, 
hence, the tax rate. Through these actions tax rate increases can be 
held between 3.5% and 5% through FY2000 and at even lower levels 
thereafter. 

Lincoln voters should also understand that an override in FY96 
makes unnecessary an even larger override next year. The Fincom 
would like to emphasize that an override this year will not increase 
overall amount of taxes Lincoln citizens will pay over the next 
several years. It will, however, alter the timing of tax payments so 
that tax rate increases are level and at about the expected rate of 
inflation. The timing of the override is part of a conscious 
strategy of moving expenditures out of FY97 and FY98 when 
construction-related debt service will be reaching its peak so that 
tax rate increases in those years will not be unreasonably large. 



16 



TABLE IX 

BUDGET PROJECTIONS 
(000's) 



REVENUES 

Levy Limit 

New Construction 1) 

Excluded Debt (2) 

Override 

Tax Levy 

Local Receipts 
State Aid (3) 
Free Cash 
Other Funds 
Assessments 
Net Revenue 



FY96 



FY97 



$ 9,545 


204 


1,121 


$10,870 


1,583 


1,694 


1,055 


210 


(398) 



$ 9,993 


130 


1,381 


$11,503 


1,623 


1,705 


998 


215 


(408) 



$15,014 



$15,636 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Town Expenditures 
Debt Service (4) 
Pensions 
Insurance 
Elemetary School 
L/S-VoTech 
Warrants 
Total Expenses 



$ 4,696 
1,597 
409 
1,127 
4,599 
1,293 

$13,722 



$ 4,832 
2,311 
429 
1,183 
4,829 
1,358 

$14,942 



Available Funds 
Tax Levy Increase 
Tax Rate Increase 



$ 1,292 
4.27% 
2.31% 



694 
5.82% 
4.63% 



Expected Warrants (5) 
Excess/Deficit 



1,452 
(160) 



878 
(184) 



Notes to Table IX: 

1. The FY96 figure represents 18 months of growth. 

2. Net of $681,000 in reimbursement from the State. 

3. This includes the $681,000 in reimbursement funds for the 
School Building Project. 

4. This includes debt service for the Public Safety Building. 

5. The FY96 figure represents recommended warrant article funding 
including the fire engine. For FY97 the amount reflects 
expected warrant article spending net of planned application of 
reserve funds to limit the tax rate increase. 



17 



VI. FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL PLAN 

All departments continue to update their five-year capital plan 
while reviewing their current budgets. Again this year, the Finance 
Committee has urged everyone to make sure they are considering their 
capital needs, particularly in regard to new technology that is 
becoming available. Our goal is to have a town-wide capital plan in 
place by the next Annual Town Meeting. 

VII. SCHOOL BUILDING PROJECT 

Work on the $11,850,000 K-8 School Building project (approved 
by Town Meeting in 1993) began in summer of 1994. At the time of 
this report, construction work is on schedule and should be 
substantially complete by the opening of school in September 1995. 
The State has approved a 54% reimbursement for this project to be 
paid to the Town in annual installments of $681,000 beginning in FY96. 

Planned as part of the Building project's furniture and 
equipment budget is $400,000 for technology equipment. This includes 
$200,000 for student/teacher workstations; $140,000 for computer 
labs/library workstations including an automated card catalogue 
system; $25,000 for Head End (a file server and related equipment); 
$12,000 for printers; $7,000 for software; and $16,000 for 
equipment for the administration offices. 

The Selectmen and Finance Committee have spent considerable 
time studying a number of financial tax impact plans to determine 
their long-term effect on future budgets and tax rate increases 
resulting from both the permanent bonding of this project as well as 
other needs in the Town. In an effort to avoid dramatic tax rate 
increases when principal payments on the permanent bonding of the 
School Building project begin (most likely in FY97 or FY98), certain 
steps need to be taken that we believe will keep year-to-year tax 
rate increases under 5%. 

A portion of the State Aid reimbursement funds received in FY96 
for the School Building project will be applied to payments due on 
temporary borrowing used this year to fund the construction. In 
order to fulfill State requirements that annual reimbursement funds 
received by the Town be applied to payments on the School Building 
project, the Selectmen and Finance Committee propose that the amount 
of $168,036, not needed for payment in FY96, be added to the existing 
Stabilization Fund to help offset the School Building project's debt 
payments in the future. 

VIII. PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING 

For two years the Public Safety Building Design Committee has 
been assessing Lincoln's needs and developing a plan for renovating 
and improving the Town's public safety facilities in order to meet 
those needs. At last year's Town Meeting the Committee reported that 
it was seeking to define a "Lincoln Plan" that in addition to meeting 



18 



applicable building and safety codes would reflect nationally 
recognized public safety standards, but in a fashion that would be 
consistent with the Town's character and circumstances. This year 
has been spent completing that definition and translating it into a 
conceptual design for an update of our forty year old Police and Fire 
Station that would permit it to serve Lincoln adequately for another 
twenty to thirty years. 

In this process the Public Safety Building Design Committee has 
had to address increased facility demands arising from development of 
Lincoln and surrounding communities, heightened demands upon public 
safety agencies due to a more complex and more regulated society and 
the need for fiscal restraint, that is, to limit the project to only 
those improvements the citizens require and can reasonably afford. 
The Fincom has monitored the progress of the Public Safety Building 
Design Committee closely and believes that it has done a commendable 
job of balancing these countervailing interests and of communicating 
difficult tradeoffs to Lincoln's governing boards and citizens. 

It is the position of the Fincom that the Town should proceed 
with the Public Safety Building project at this time as proposed by 
the PSBDC and the Selectmen. The PSBDC has been diligent in 
including in the proposal only those expenditures genuinely required 
to meet Lincoln's needs. Delaying the project will force the costs 
of the renovation up by approximately 10% per year due to rapidly 
escalating construction costs. While delaying the project might in 
principle assist in spreading out the debt service faced by the Town, 
the delay required to be of much help in this regard would be 
imprudent from a public safety standpoint and would to a large degree 
be negated by the cost increases just noted. If citizens cooperate 
in managing tax rate increases as the Fincom has outlined elsewhere 
in this Report, the debt required to finance the Public Safety 
Building project at the $2.5 million level can be absorbed in 
Lincoln's budgets over the next few years while holding tax rate 
increases to about 5%. In summary, the Fincom applauds the work of 
the Public Safety Building Design Committee and recommends proceeding 
with the Public Safety Building project as proposed. 

IX. CONCLUSION 

With a remarkably minor amount of disruption and confusion, the 
Town has absorbed a formidable number of personnel and physical 
changes since last year. The School Buildings project is well 
underway and the Finance Committee believes that sound financial 
plans are in place to address the three other major projects before 
us. The maintenance program for Town buildings is in progress. 
Plans are being considered for long-term, comprehensive maintenance 
programs for other Town assets and the Long Range Planning Committee 
is being reconsidered as an active participant in the operation of 
the Town. 



19 



With the help of the Executive Secretary, we are planning an 
in-depth review of all the major Town departments. The purpose is to 
help us better understand the functions and the missions of the units 
and how they relate to the building of a budget. We will be 
undertaking a similar review of the various school systems and expect 
the entire project to take several years. 

We are presenting a slightly-improved services budget for 
FY96. This year, however, the Committee is supporting an override as 
part of the plan to maintain modest and relatively even tax rate 
increases as we undertake the capital plans previously described in 
the Report. The override does NOT mean a big increase in taxes but 
it will help us acquire equipment that will have to be purchased in 
the very near future and it will do it in a planned and controlled 
way. 

We are delighted with the input we received from the few 
citizens who attended our meetings during the year. They suggested 
that the report be more "user friendly" and we hope you find it so. 
Some of their other contributions are reflected in the plans that are 
presented in this document. We look forward to their continued 
participation and urge others to join them. 

We wish to thank the Governance Committee for their efforts. 
Their recommendations have improved the interaction among Town boards. 

We believe that the budget for FY96 is sensible and fair. It 
is part of a multi-year strategy designed to accomplish well-defined 
goals. We look forward to your support at the Town Meeting and at 
the ballot box. 



20 



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38 



WARRANT 
1995 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the 
legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town 
Meeting for the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks 
School Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday, the twenty-fifth day 
of March next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following 
articles, except Article 1, and also to meet at the Smith School 
Gymnasium on Monday, the twenty-seventh day of March next, at 7:30 
a.m., then and there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a 
copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, seven days at 
least before the twenty-fifth day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March 
twenty-seventh, will be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 
8:00 p.m. 



ARTICLE l. To bring in their votes for one or more members for each of 
the following offices: 

Town Moderator for one year to complete term 

Town Clerk for one year 

Selectman for three years 

Treasurer for one year 

Assessor for three years 

Tax Collector for three years 

School Committee member (2) for three years 

School Committee member for one year to complete term 

Water Commissioner for three years 

Board of Health member for three years 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

Planning Board member for five years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for one year to complete 

term 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

Library Trustee for three years 

DeCordova & Dana Museum and Park Trustee for four years 

Housing Commission Member (2) for three years 

Housing Commission Member for 2 years to complete term 



39 



Recreation Committee member for three years 
Regional School Committee member (2) for three years 

and also the following question: 

(1) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to assess an additional 
$160,000 in real estate and personal property taxes for the 
purposes of purchasing a fire pumper and accessories for the 
fiscal year beginning July first nineteen hundred and 
ninety-five?" 

(2) "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to exempt from the 
provisions of Proposition two and one-half, so called, the 
amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to design 
and carry out renovations and additions to the Town's Public 
Safety Building including the purchase of equipment and the 
incurring of related costs?" 



ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 

Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of the Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any 
Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 
compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 



40 



ARTICLE 6. To hear a report on the implementation of the 

recommendations contained in the 1994 report to the Town 
of the Task Force on Town Governance, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Governance Committee 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof in order to design and carry out 
renovations and additions to the Town's Public Safety Building, 
including the purchase of equipment and the incurring of related costs 
for the fiscal year beginning July first nineteen hundred and 
ninety-five contingent upon the passage of a proposition 2 1/2 debt 
exclusion referendum, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Public Safety Building Design Committee 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, said monies to be put into the 
Town's Stabilization Fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum of 

money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the purposes of purchasing a 
fire pumper and accessories for the fiscal year beginning July first 
nineteen hundred and ninety-five contingent upon the passage of a 
proposition 2 1/2 levy limit override referendum, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used by the public safety 
departments for the purchase of vehicles and/or equipment, and to see 
if the Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of excess 
vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



41 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen 

and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary 
school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

School Committee, Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the purchase of new computer 
equipment for Town departments including hardware, software, 
installation, training, maintenance and other related costs, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the acquisition, 
installation, and operation of a public switched telephone network 
that will connect School and Town buildings with a common telephone 
system, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, School Committee 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used to pay for removal of 
contaminated soil discovered in the excavation of a trench along Sandy 
Pond Road dug for purposes of installing water mains to the new CT 
disinfection facility, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of undertaking a 
site assessment of that area of Sandy Pond Road adjacent to a 
contaminated soil exposure, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



42 



ARTICLE 16, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof to pay for the additional 
construction costs for completion of the CT disinfection facility at 
Flint's Pond, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money, distinct from that authorized under Article 5 of 
the Warrant, to provide educational program enhancement consistent 
with the intent of the State Education Reform Act as determined by the 
School Committee. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and apropriate a sum 

of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and maintenance of 
certain Town buildings, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used for the design and 
construction of a salt shed at the Public Works Garage and to 
authorize the Selectmen to accept any and all grants, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof to be used for studies, design, 
engineering, construction, reconstruction, and/or maintenance and 
repair of the Town's roads, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



43 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used for the construction, 
reconstruction, and/or maintenance and repair of roads and bridges, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, in order to supplement $20,000 
previously appropriated from Free Cash under Article 21 at the March 
26, 1994 Town Meeting for use by the Department of Public Works for 
the purchase of vehicle fuel pumps and/or equipment including 
installation and other related costs, and to see if the Town will 
authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of excess vehicle fuel 
pumps and equipment, said appropriation to be used to cover the 
increased costs of undertaking the aforementioned work, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of providing a 
matching contribution for a Commonwealth of Massachusetts tree 
planting grant program, and conducting an inventory and assessment of 
town trees, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Tree Warden 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the purpose of undertaking 
necessary remodeling and/or repairs to the Town's buildings in order 
to improve access to handicapped persons, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



44 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof for the repayment to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts of Lincoln's portion of the cost of 
improvements to the Route 2 crossing at Bethany Drive area, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or any combination thereof, to be used for the purchase of 
vehicles and/or equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the 
disposal . by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town, in accordance with the sense of the 

March 27, 1993 Special Town Meeting expressed under 
Article 2 of the Warrant for that Meeting, will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money from the Water Department surplus of July 1, 1995, to be 
placed in the Town's Land Conservation Fund, in consideration for the 
previously approved transfer under said Article 2 of 2.5 acres of land 
from Conservation Commission jurisdiction to the Water Commissioners 
for the CT disinfection facility, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen, Conservation Commission, Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to recommend that funds 

(including funds appropriated under Article 27 of this 
warrant) in the Town's Land Conservation Fund be used by the 
Conservation Commission to purchase the property, or rights therein, 
associated with the Adams estate on Sandy Pond and Baker Farm Road and 
consisting of approximately 14 acres of land identified as Assessor's 
maps and parcel numbers 42/6 and 39/5 to be permanently conserved with 
public access, or take any other action thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



45 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to further alter the sources 

of funding for the construction of a CT disinfection 
facility for Flint's Pond water supply, authorization for which 
construction and funding was previously given by vote adopted under 
Article 1 of the Warrant for the March 27, 1993 Special Town Meeting, 
and subsequently amended by vote adopted under Article 30 of the 
Warrant for the 1994 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 30. Resolution that the Town of Lincoln request that a segment 
of the Sudbury River flowing through the Town of Lincoln 

be designated for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers 

System. 

Resolved: 

Whereas: The Sudbury River flows through the Town of 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, and is a natural resource of great 
importance to the Town and State of Massachusetts. 

Whereas: The quality and quantity of its water are 

essential to the maintenance and enhancement of the 

ecology, recreation, ground water supplies, and the 
physical beauty of the landscape. 

Whereas: The National Park Service has determined that 
portions of the Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord Rivers are 
eligible for Wild and Scenic River designation based on 
their outstanding wildlife, recreational, cultural, 
historical, and scenic values. 

Whereas: The people of Lincoln recognize the importance 
of this irreplaceable natural asset and hereby express a 
commitment to the protection and preservation of the 
Sudbury River and its outstanding values. 

Whereas: The Town of Lincoln, the Sudbury, Assabet, and 
Concord Rivers Study Committee, and the National Park 
Service have worked cooperatively to develop an effective 
locally-based river conservation plan that will ensure the 
necessary protection of the river and its related 
resources. 

Whereas: The Wild and Scenic designation would provide 
further protection of the river and would retain local ! 
control and regulation by the towns within the designated 
river segment. 



46 



Therefore: Be it resolved that the people of the Town of 
Lincoln petition the Congress of the United States of 
America to enact legislation designating the Sudbury River 
as a Wild and Scenic River in accordance with the locally 
developed Sudbury, Assabet and Concord River Conservation 
Plan, provided that the Wild and Scenic River designation 
shall not involve federal acquisition or management of 
lands. 

Therefore: Be it further resolved that the townspeople 
urge our town officials to consider, and wherever 
appropriate, to adopt additional local measures that will 
strengthen the Town's protection of this critical resource. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen, Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to approve an addition to its 

general by-laws in order to establish a mandatory 
recycling program, consisting of a new Section 15 of Article XI , 
Miscellaneous , reading substantially as follows: 

Section 15 . All Lincoln residents or other persons using 
the Town's transfer station facility shall comply with all 
requirements imposed by the Selectmen from time to time 
for the physical separation and separate disposal of 
recyclable waste materials. Categories for such mandatory 
recycling may include, but are not limited to: glass, 
cans and other metal, paper and newspaper, and other 
wastes. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Recycling Committee, Selectmen 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning Bylaw, 

including Section 14.3.2 (f) and Section 14.3.8 to allow 
the granting of special permits for accessory apartments in 
residential buildings constructed at least ten (10) years prior to the 
date of the application for the apartment permit, or in certain 
building additions which are constructed less than ten (10) years 
prior to the date of such application, the text of which proposed 
by-law is available for inspection at the Office of the Town Clerk, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



47 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend various provisions of 
its Zoning By-law, including Section 5.3 thereof, in order 
(i) to clarify and confirm that all religious and public or non-profit 
educational uses, including museums and libraries, are permitted as of 
right in each zoning district, and (ii) to impose upon land or 
structures devoted to such religious and public or non-profit 
educational uses, including museums and libraries, reasonable 
regulations concerning the bulk and height of structures and 
determining yard sizes, lot area, setbacks, open space, parking and 
building coverage requirements, to the extent permitted by Chapter 
40A, Section 3 of the Massachusetts General Laws, the text of which 
proposed By-law amendments is available for inspection at the Office 
of the Town Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XI , 

Miscellaneous of its general by-laws by deleting Section 3 
(c) thereof in its entirety and by adding to Article XI a new Section 
3A, entitled " Public Way Access Permits ", the text of which proposed 
By-law amendment is available for inspection at the Office of the Town 
Clerk, or take any other action relative thereto. 



Selectmen, Planning Board 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to permanently dedicate and 

restrict for active and passive recreation and open space 
purposes a certain parcel of land which has been used as the Town's 
landfill and has now been been deactivated and closed, as part of the 
Town's satisfaction of conditions or requirements for receiving a 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Landfill Capping Grant for a portion of 
the costs of such landfill closure, said parcel being situated on the 
southwesterly side of Mill Street adjacent to the southerly boundary 
on the Minute Man National Historical Park and being a portion of the 
parcel taken by the Selectmen pursuant to authority granted under 
Article 3 of the warrant for the October 12, 1972 Special Town 
Meeting, and also being shown on a plan of land on file with the Town 
Clerk, saving and reserving, however, such rights of way or access 
easements for the benefit of any abutter of the aforesaid parcel which 
the Town may authorize to be granted under this article, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



48 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to rename a portion of Ridge 

Road/ a public way, as "Greenridge Lane"/ or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept gifts of money, or 

real or personal property for enhancement of its 
recreation facilities, or for any other purpose, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law in 

order to establish a North Lincoln Planned Development 
District within the* NO-North Lincoln Planning District, pursuant to 
the provision of Section 12.5 of the Zoning By-law as adopted pursuant 
to Article 5 of the Warrant for the November 1, 1986 Special Town 
Meeting, by undertaking the following action: 

With respect to the creation of a proposed "North Lincoln 
Planned Development District No. 3" for commercial office 
development, by amending the Zoning Map to include the 
North Lincoln Planned Development District No. 3, having 
boundaries encompassing 18.24 acres, more or less, and 
being more particularly shown and described on a plan 
entitled "Proposed North Lincoln Planned Development 
District No. 3 - Office", dated January 12, 1995, or as 
further described as follows: 

Lot #4-1 consisting of 10 acres (of 160.94), more or 

less 

Lot #4-4 consisting of 0.50 acres (of 1.47) more or 

less 

Lot #4-6 consisting of 0.07 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-7 consisting of 0.15 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-8 consisting of 1.70 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-9.03 consisting of 4.71 acres, more or less 

Lot #4-11.02 consisting of 1.11 acres, more or less 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

By Petition 



49 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings, 
thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting 
aforesaid. Given under our hands this twenty-first day of February in 
the year of our Lord one-thousand nine-hundred ninety-five. 



Peter 



rar 




John S. Kerr, II 




w /?>* ' , it 

Harriet B. 'Todd 




SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 






50